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  • 1.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Ctr Corp Social Responsibil, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Sousa-Poza, Alfonso
    Institute for Health Care & Public Management, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    Reisch, Lucia A.
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Ctr Corp Social Responsibil, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Univ Bremen, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fernandez-Alvira, Juan M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    De Henauwg, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Univ Hosp, Dept Publ Hlth, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Ghent, Belgium.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Fac Med, Dept Paediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Lauria, Fabio
    Institute of Food Science & Technology, National Research Council, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Williams, Garrath
    Univ Lancaster, Dept Polit Philosophy & Relig, Lancaster, England.
    Bammann, Karin
    Univ Bremen, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Publ Hlth & Nursing Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Maternal employment and childhood obesity: A European perspective2013Ingår i: Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 0167-6296, E-ISSN 1879-1646, Vol. 32, nr 4, s. 728-742Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The substantial increase in female employment rates in Europe over the past two decades has often been linked in political and public rhetoric to negative effects on child development, including obesity. We analyse this association between maternal employment and childhood obesity using rich objective reports of various anthropometric and other measures of fatness from the IDEFICS study of children aged 2-9 in 16 regions of eight European countries. Based on such data as accelerometer measures and information from nutritional diaries, we also investigate the effects of maternal employment on obesity's main drivers: calorie intake and physical activity. Our analysis provides little evidence for any association between maternal employment and childhood obesity, diet or physical activity. (c) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Hense, Sabrina
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiological Methods and Etiologic Research, Bremen Institute for Prevention Research and Social Medicine (BIPS), Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med BIPS, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med BIPS, Dept Biometry & Data Management, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Health, Dept Movement & Sport Sci, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Goteborg, Sahlgranska Sch Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, EU Ciencas Salud, GENUD Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Pavia, Italy.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med BIPS, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Sleep Duration and Overweight in European Children: Is the Association Modified by Geographic Region?2011Ingår i: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 34, nr 7, s. 885-890Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Objectives: To investigate differences and a possible effect modification by geographical region in the association between sleep duration and overweight. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Primary schools and preschools in 8 European countries. Participants: 7867 children aged 2 to 9 years. Interventions: Not applicable. Measurements: Nocturnal sleep duration was assessed as part of a parental 24-h recall. Height and weight were measured by standardized procedures across centers. Data on personal, social, environmental and behavioral factors were collected using a standardized parental questionnaire. Results: Sleep duration differed (P < 0.001) between European regions and normal vs. overweight children. A dose-dependent inverse association between sleep duration and overweight could be seen, with crude odds ratios ranging from 1.73 (99% CI 1.33; 2.25) for sleeping between 10 and 11 h to 3.81 (99% CI 2.85; 5.09) for sleeping less than 9 h (reference category > 11 h). This persisted after adjustment, but remained significant only for sleeping less than 9 h per night (north: OR = 1.70; 99% CI 1.13; 2.58 vs. south: OR = 2.84; 99% CI 1.57; 5.12) if stratified by region. No effect modification by region could be found, but adjustment for region accounted for changes in the effect estimate for sleeping less than 9 h (OR = 2.22; 99% CI 1.64; 3.02). The association was stronger in school children than in preschool children. Conclusion: Geographic region and related aspects-even if they do not seem to modify the association between sleep and overweight-should in any case be taken in consideration as a confounding factor on this association.

  • 3.
    Huang, Christina Y.
    et al.
    Pardee Rand Grad Sch, Santa Monica, CA 90407 USA / RAND Corp, Santa Monica, CA 90407 USA.
    Reisch, Lucia A.
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Fac Med, Dept Paediat, Budapest, Hungary.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Tornaritis, Michalis
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, POB 453, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Siani, Alfonso
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    Fernandez-Alvira, Juan M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS GmbH, Bremen, Germany / Univ Bremen, Fac Math & Comp Sci, Bremen, Germany.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS GmbH, Bremen, Germany / Univ Bremen, Fac Math & Comp Sci, Bremen, Germany.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, POB 453, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pester power and its consequences: do European children's food purchasing requests relate to diet and weight outcomes?2016Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, nr 13, s. 2393-2403Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Children may influence household spending through pester power'. The present study examined pestering through parent-child food shopping behaviours in relation to children's diet and weight status. Design Cross-sectional and prospective analyses drawn from the IDEFICS study, a cohort study of parents and their children. Children's height and weight were measured and their recent diets were reported by parental proxy based on the Children's Eating Habits Questionnaire-FFQ at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Parents also completed questionnaires at both time points about pestering, including whether the child goes grocery shopping with them, asks for items seen on television and is bought requested food items. Setting Participants were recruited from eight European countries for the IDEFICS study (non-nationally representative sample). Subjects Study participants were children aged 2-9 years at enrolment and their parents. A total of 13 217 parent-child dyads were included at baseline. Two years later, 7820 of the children were re-examined. Results Most parents (63 %) at baseline reported sometimes' acquiescing to their children's requests to purchase specific foods. Pestering was modestly associated with weight and diet. At baseline, children whose parents often' complied consumed more high-sugar and high-fat foods. Children who often' asked for items seen on television were likely to become overweight after 2 years (OR=1<bold></bold>31), whereas never' asking protected against overweight (OR=0<bold></bold>72). Conclusions Pestering was modestly related to diet and weight in cross-sectional, but not longitudinal analyses. Asking for items seen on television had the most robust relationships across child outcomes and over time.

  • 4.
    Lissner, Lauren
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Dept Community Med & Publ Hlth, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lanfer, Anne
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Olafsdottir, Steingerdur
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Dept Community Med & Publ Hlth, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Sch Hlth Sci, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Santaliestra-Pasias, Alba M.
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Sch Hlth Sci, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Pecs, Hungary.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    Loit, Helle-Mai
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kourides, Yiannis
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Milan, Italy.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, Bremen, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Buchecker, Kirsten
    TTZ, Dept Food Sci, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Television habits in relation to overweight, diet and taste preferences in European children: the IDEFICS study2012Ingår i: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 27, nr 9, s. 705-715Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Early television exposure has been associated with various health outcomes including childhood obesity. This paper describes associations between patterns of television viewing, on one hand, and diet, taste preference and weight status, on the other, in European preschoolers and schoolchildren. The IDEFICS baseline survey was conducted at examination centers in Italy, Estonia, Cyprus, Belgium, Sweden, Germany, Hungary, and Spain. 15,144 children aged 2-9 completed the basic protocol, including anthropometry and parental questionnaires on their diets and television habits. A subsample of 1,696 schoolchildren underwent further sensory testing for fat and sweet taste preferences. Three dichotomous indicators described: children's habitual television exposure time; television viewing during meals; and having televisions in their bedrooms. Based on these variables we investigated television habits in relation to overweight (IOTF) and usual consumption of foods high in fat and sugar. A possible role of taste preference in the latter association was tested in the sensory subgroup. All television indicators were significantly associated with increased risk of overweight, with odds ratios ranging from 1.21 to 1.30, in fully adjusted models. Children's propensities to consume high-fat and high-sugar foods were positively and, in most analyses, monotonically associated with high-risk television behaviors. The associations between television and diet propensities were not explained by preference for added fat or sugar in test foods. To summarize, in addition to being more overweight, children with high-risk television behaviors may, independent of objectively measured taste preferences for fat and sugar, passively overconsume higher-fat and particularly higher-sugar diets.

  • 5.
    Reeske, Anna
    et al.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Spallek, Jacob
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bielefeld, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Int Publ Hlth, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany.
    Bammann, Karin
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Publ Hlth & Nursing Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Kourides, Yiannis
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Nagy, Peter
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Stat, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Migrant Background and Weight Gain in Early Infancy: Results from the German Study Sample of the IDEFICS Study2013Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, nr 4, artikel-id e60648Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine variations in infant weight gain between children of parents with and without migrant background and to investigate how these differences are explained by pre- and perinatal factors. Methods: We used data on birth weight and weight at six months from well-child check-up books that were collected from a population-based German sample of children in the IDEFICS study (n = 1,287). We calculated unadjusted and adjusted means for weight z-scores at birth and six months later. We applied linear regression for change in weight z-score and we calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for rapid weight gain by logistic regression, adjusted for biological, social and behavioural factors. Results: Weight z-scores for migrants and Germans differed slightly at birth, but were markedly increased for Turkish and Eastern European infants at age six months. Turkish infants showed the highest change in weight z-score during the first 6 months (beta = 0.35; 95% CI 0.14-0.56) and an increased probability of rapid weight gain compared with German infants. Examination of the joint effect of migrant and socioeconomic status (SES) showed the greatest change in weight z-scores in Turkish infants from middle SES families (beta = 0.77; 95% CI 0.40-1.14) and infants of parents from Eastern European countries with high SES (beta = 0.72; 95% CI 0.13-1.32). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that migrant background is an independent risk factor for infant weight gain and suggest that the onset of health inequalities in overweight starts in early infancy.

  • 6.
    Regber, Susann
    et al.
    Nord Sch Publ Hlth NHV, SE-40242 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Novak, Masuma
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hense, Sabrina
    Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res BIPS, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Sandstrom, Tatiana Zverkova
    Nord Sch Publ Hlth NHV, SE-40242 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res BIPS, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Marild, Staffan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Assessment of selection bias in a health survey of children and families - the IDEFICS Sweden-study2013Ingår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, artikel-id 418Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A health survey was performed in 2007-2008 in the IDEFICS/Sweden study (Identification and prevention of dietary-and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) in children aged 2-9 years. We hypothesized that families with disadvantageous socioeconomic and -demographic backgrounds and children with overweight and obesity were underrepresented. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we compared Swedish IDEFICS participants (N=1,825) with referent children (N=1,825) using data from Statistics Sweden population registers. IDEFICS participants were matched for age and gender with a referent child living in the same municipality. Longitudinal weight and height data from birth to 8 years was collected for both populations (n=3,650) from the children's local health services. Outcome measures included the family's socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, maternal body mass index (BMI) and smoking habits before pregnancy, the children's BMI standard deviation score (SDS) at the age of inclusion in the IDEFICS study (BMISDS-index), and the children's BMI-categories during the age-span. Comparisons between groups were done and a multiple logistic regression analysis for the study of determinants of participation in the IDEFICS study was performed. Results: Compared with IDEFICS participants, referent families were more likely to have lower education and income, foreign backgrounds, be single parents, and have mothers who smoked before pregnancy. Maternal BMI before pregnancy and child's BMISDS-index did not differ between groups. Comparing the longitudinal data-set, the prevalence of obesity was significantly different at age 8 years n=45 (4.5%) versus n=31 (2.9%) in the referent and IDEFICS populations, respectively. In the multivariable adjusted model, the strongest significant association with IDEFICS study participation was parental Swedish background (odds ratio (OR) = 1.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.48-2.47) followed by parents having high education OR 1.80, 95% CI (1.02-3.16) and being married or co-habiting OR 1.75 95% CI (1.38-2.23). Conclusion: Families with single parenthood, foreign background, low education and income were underrepresented in the IDEFICS Sweden study. BMI at inclusion had no selection effect, but developing obesity was significantly greater among referents.

  • 7.
    Wolters, Maike
    et al.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Boernhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Schwarz, Heike
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Rise, Patrizia
    Univ Milan, Dept Pharmacol & Biomol Sci, DiSFeB, Milan, Italy.
    Galli, Claudio
    Univ Milan, Dept Pharmacol & Biomol Sci, DiSFeB, Milan, Italy.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Milan, Italy.
    Russo, Paola
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Fraterman, Arno
    Med Versorgungszentrum Dr Eberhard & Partner Dort, Lab Med, Dortmund, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Natl Inst Hlth Promot, Pecs, Hungary.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Stat, Fac Math & Comp Sci, Bremen, Germany.
    Association of desaturase activity and C-reactive protein in European children2017Ingår i: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 81, nr 1, s. 27-32Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Desaturase enzymes influence the fatty acid (FA) composition of body tissues and their activity affects the conversion rate of saturated to monounsaturated FA and of polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) to long-chain PUFA. Desaturase activity has further been shown to be associated with inflammation. We investigate the association between delta-9 (D9D), delta-6 (D6D) and delta-5 desaturase (D5D) activity and high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) in young children. METHODS: In the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) cohort study children were examined at baseline (TO) and after 2 y (T1). D9D, D6D, and D5D activities were estimated from TO product-precursor FA ratios. CRP was measured at TO and T1. In a subsample of 1,943 children with available information on FA, CRP, and covariates, the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of desaturase activity and CRP were analyzed. RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, a D9D increase of 0.01 units was associated with a 11% higher risk of having a serum CRP Percentile 75 (P75) (OR, 99% CI: 1.11 (1.01; 1.22)) whereas D6D and D5D were not associated with CRP. No significant associations were observed between baseline desaturase activity and CRP 2 y later. CONCLUSION: Cross-sectionally, our results indicate a positive association of D9D and CRP independent of weight status. High D9D activity may increase the risk of subclinical inflammation which is associated with metabolic disorders. As D9D expression increases with higher intake of saturated FA and carbohydrates, dietary changes may influence D9D activity and thus CRP. However, it remains to be investigated whether there is a causal relationship between D9D activity and CRP.

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