Högskolan i Skövde

his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Fornes, Romina
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maliqueo, Manuel
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Endocrinology and Metabolism Laboratory, Department of Medicine, West Division, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Hu, Min
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hadi, Laila
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.
    Unidad Académica Multidisciplinaria Reynosa Aztlán, Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico.
    Ebefors, Kerstin
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyström, Jenny
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Labrie, Fernand
    Laval University Research Center in Molecular Endocrinology, Oncology and Human Genomics, CHUL Research Center, Quebec, Canada.
    Jansson, Thomas
    Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Sciences, University Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
    Benrick, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The effect of androgen excess on maternal metabolism, placental function and fetal growth in obese dams2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 8066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are often overweight or obese. To study the effects of maternal androgen excess in obese dams on metabolism, placental function and fetal growth, female C57Bl6J mice were fed a control (CD) or a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet for 4-10 weeks, and then mated. On gestational day (GD) 15.5-17.5, dams were injected with dihydrotestosterone (CD-DHT, HF/HS-DHT) or a vehicle (CD-Veh, HF/HS-Veh). HF/HS dams had higher fat content, both before mating and on GD18.5, with no difference in glucose homeostasis, whereas the insulin sensitivity was higher in DHT-exposed dams. Compared to the CD groups, the livers from HF/HS dams weighed more on GD18.5, the triglyceride content was higher, and there was a dysregulation of liver enzymes related to lipogenesis and higher mRNA expression of Fitm1. Fetuses from HF/HS-Veh dams had lower liver triglyceride content and mRNA expression of Srebf1c. Maternal DHT exposure, regardless of diet, decreased fetal liver Pparg mRNA expression and increased placental androgen receptor protein expression. Maternal diet-induced obesity, together with androgen excess, affects maternal and fetal liver function as demonstrated by increased triglyceride content and dysfunctional expression of enzymes and transcription factors involved in de novo lipogenesis and fat storage.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Nilsson, Emma
    et al.
    Epigenetics and Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Benrick, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kokosar, Milana
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krook, Anna
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Källman, Thomas
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, National Bioinformatics Infrastructure Sweden, SciLifeLab, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Martis, Mihaela M.
    National Bioinformatics Infrastructure Sweden, Division of Cell Biology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Højlund, Kurt
    Department of Endocrinology, Odense University, Odense C, Denmark.
    Ling, Charlotte
    Epigenetics and Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Transcriptional and Epigenetic Changes Influencing Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome2018In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 103, no 12, p. 4465-4477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Despite this, the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in PCOS are largely unknown. Objective: To investigate the genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in skeletal muscle from women with PCOS and controls and relate them to phenotypic variations. Design/Participants: In a case-control study, skeletal muscle biopsies from women with PCOS (n = 17) and age-, weight-, and body mass index. matched controls (n = 14) were analyzed by array-based DNA methylation and mRNA expression profiling. Results: Eighty-five unique transcripts were differentially expressed in muscle from women with PCOS vs controls, including DYRK1A, SYNPO2, SCP2, and NAMPT. Furthermore, women with PCOS had reduced expression of genes involved in immune system pathways. Two CpG sites showed differential DNA methylation after correction for multiple testing. However, an mRNA expression of similar to 30% of the differentially expressed genes correlated with DNA methylation levels of CpG sites in or near the gene. Functional follow-up studies demonstrated that KLF10 is under transcriptional control of insulin, where insulin promotes glycogen accumulation in myotubes of human muscle cells. Testosterone downregulates the expression levels of COL1A1 and MAP2K6. Conclusion: PCOS is associated with aberrant skeletal muscle gene expression with dysregulated pathways. Furthermore, we identified specific changes in muscle DNA methylation that may affect gene expression. This study showed that women with PCOS have epigenetic and transcriptional changes in skeletal muscle that, in part, can explain the metabolic abnormalities seen in these women.

  • 3.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Gustaw
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shrestha, Man Mohan
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rodriguez Paris, Valentina
    School of Biomedical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Lu, Haojiang
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Banks, Jasmine
    School of Biomedical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia ; Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Samad, Manisha
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perian, Charlène
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jude, Baptiste
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engman, Viktor
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boi, Roberto
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Epigenetics and Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ling, Charlotte
    Epigenetics and Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nyström, Jenny
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Turner, Nigel
    School of Biomedical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia ; Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Lanner, Johanna T.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Benrick, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Proteomic analysis shows decreased Type I fibers and ectopic fat accumulation in skeletal muscle from women with PCOS2024In: eLife, ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome’s (PCOS) main feature is hyperandrogenism, which is linked to a higher risk of metabolic disorders in women. Gene expression analyses in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle reveal dysregulated metabolic pathways in women with PCOS, but these differences do not necessarily lead tochanges in protein levels and biological function. Methods: To advance our understanding of the molecular alterations in PCOS, we performed global proteomic and phosphorylation site analysis using tandem mass spectrometry. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle were collected at baseline from 10 women with and without PCOS, and in women with PCOS after 5 weeks of treatment with electrical stimulation. Results: Perilipin-1, a protein that typically coats the surface of lipid droplets in adipocytes, was increased whereas proteins involved in muscle contraction and type I muscle fiber function were downregulated in PCOS muscle. Proteins in the thick and thin filaments had many altered phosphorylation sites, indicating differences in protein activity and function. The upregulated proteins in muscle post treatment were enriched in pathways involved in extracellular matrix organization and wound healing, which may reflect a protective adaptation to repeated contractions and tissue damage due to needling. A similar, albeit less pronounced, upregulation in extracellular matrix organization pathways was also seen in adipose tissue. Conclusions: Our results suggest that hyperandrogenic women with PCOS have higher levels of extramyocellular lipids and fewer oxidative insulin-sensitive type I muscle fibers. These could be key factors leading insulin resistance in PCOS muscle while electric stimulation-induced tissue remodeling may be protective.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf