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  • 1.
    Alonso-Calvete, Alejandra
    et al.
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Lorenzo-Martínez, Miguel
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain ; Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Faculty of Sports Sciences and Physical Education, Campus Bastiagueiro, University of A Coruña, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment. REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian
    CLINURSID Research Group, Psychiatry, Radiology, Public Health, Nursing and Medicine Department, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain ; Faculty of Education Sciences, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain ; Simulation and Intensive Care Unit of Santiago (SICRUS) Reseach Group, Health Research Institute of Santiago, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela-CHUS, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Does Vibration Foam Roller Influence Performance and Recovery?: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis2022In: Sports Medicine - Open, ISSN 2199-1170, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 32Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Foam rolling has been extensively investigated, showing benefits in performance and recovery. Recently, vibration has been added to foam rollers, with hypothesized advantages over conventional foam rollers. However, there is no systematic evidence in this regard.

    Objective: To carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis about the effects of vibration foam roller (VFR) on performance and recovery.

    Methods: A systematic search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science and SportDiscus according to the PRISMA guidelines. The outcomes included performance (jump, agility and strength) and recovery variables (blood flow, pain and fatigue) measured after an intervention with VFR. The methodological quality was assessed with the PEDro scale. A random-effects model was used to perform the meta-analysis.

    Results: Initially, 556 studies were found and after the eligibility criteria 10 studies were included in the systematic review and 9 in the meta-analysis. There was no significant effects on jump performance (SMD = 0.14 [95% CI − 0.022 to 0.307]; p = 0.101; I2 = 1.08%) and no significant beneficial effects were reported on isokinetic strength (SMD = 0.16 [95% CI − 0.041 to 0.367]; p = 0.117; I2 = 9.7%). Recovery appears to be enhanced after VFR interventions, but agility does not seem to increase after VFR interventions.

    Conclusion: This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that VFR could have great potential for increasing jump performance, agility, strength and enhancing recovery. Further research is needed to confirm the effects of VFR on performance and recovery.

    Trial Registration This investigation was registered in PROSPERO with the code CRD42021238104.

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  • 2.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Lundkvist, Erik
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    Unit of Investigation in Human Nutrition, Growth and Development of Galicia (GALINUT), University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Talent Selection Strategies and Relationship With Success in European Basketball National Team Programs2021In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 666839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited knowledge of the talent selection strategies used by national sporting organizations to identify and develop talented players in basketball. Therefore, we aimed to explore differences in selection strategies between European youth basketball national team (NT) programs, and how they relate to the program’s success. Specifically, we examined differences in the number of youth NT players and within-country variance in the 1988–1999 generations between 38 countries (n men = 38, women = 32). Further, we tested if the number of youth NT players and within-country variance was related to the NTs senior ranking, youth ranking, and youth-to-senior player promotion, using generalized Bayesian multilevel models. We further checked the moderating effect of the amount of licensed basketball players in each country. On average, 15.6 ± 2.0 male and 12.4 ± 1.8 female players were selected per generation. Over a third of the NTs consistently selected a higher or lower number of players than the average, with a difference of 8.1 players (95% CI [5.8, 10.8]) for men and 7.6 players (95% CI [5.4, 10.0]) for women between the countries with the highest and lowest average. When licensed players were used as moderator, the differences decreased but did not disappear, in both genders. There was an above 99.3% probability that a higher number of players was positively related to higher men’s senior and youth rankings, and women’s youth ranking. Within countries, generations with a higher number of youth players generated more senior players, with a probability of 98.4% on the men’s, and 97.3% on the women’s side. When licensed players were used as moderator, the probabilities for these relationships remained largely unaffected, apart from women’s youth ranking, which sank to 80.5%. In conclusion, the selection strategy in basketball NT programs varies between European countries and selecting a higher number of players possibly relates to better long-term performance and more players promoted to the senior NTs. These findings show that talent development programs should make conscious decisions about their selection strategies as it can affect their success.

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  • 3.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Barcala-Furelos, Roberto
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain ; CLINURSID Research Group, Psychiatry, Radiology and Public Health Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain ; Institute of Research of Santiago (IDIS), Spain ; International Drowning Research Alliance–IDRA, Río de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Fernández-Méndez, María
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Prieto, Jose A.
    Faculty Padre Ossó, University of Oviedo, Spain.
    Ríos-Ave, Andrés
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain ; CLINURSID Research Group, Psychiatry, Radiology and Public Health Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain ; Institute of Research of Santiago (IDIS), Spain ; Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    How can lifeguards recover better? A cross-over study comparing resting, running, and foam rolling2017In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1887-1891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of active recovery in form of running or foam rolling on clearing blood lactate compared to remain sitting after a water rescue.

    Method: A quasi experimental cross-over design was used to test the effectiveness of two active recovery methods: foam rolling (FR) and running (RR), compared with passive recovery (PR) on the blood lactate clearance after performing a water rescue. Twelve lifeguards from Marín (Pontevedra) completed the study. The participants performed a 100-meter water rescue and a 25-minute recovery protocol.

    Results: The post recovery lactate levels were significantly lower for foam rolling (4.4 ± 1.5 mmol/l, P = 0.005, d = 0.94) and running (4.9 ± 2.3 mmol/l, P = 0.027, d = 1.21) compared with resting (7.2 ± 2.5 mmol/l); there was no significant difference between foam rolling and running (P = 1.000).

    Conclusions: We found that surf lifesavers clear out blood lactate more efficient when performing an active recovery protocol. Foam rolling is an effective method of increasing the rate of blood lactate clearance. These two recovery methods are also adequate for surf lifeguards as they do not interfere with the surveillance aspect of their job.

  • 4.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Senior and youth national team competitive experience: influence on player and team performance in European basketball championships2017In: International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, ISSN 2474-8668, E-ISSN 1474-8185, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 832-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to discover if the number of previous senior and youth national team championships played relates to the team and player performance at the European basketball championships. The sample consisted of all national teams and their players participating in the 2011, 2013 and 2015 European Championships for men (teams n = 72; players n = 697) and women (teams n = 52, players = 520). The teams were classified into four groups based on their highest stage reached in the tournament. A k-means cluster was used to group the players as high, medium or low performers according to their efficiency rating. The number of previous senior and youth championships was compared between groups. Better performing teams and players had a higher number of previous senior championships. The competitive experience differentiates low performing players for both genders, but only distinguishes high from medium performing players for women. No differences in the number of youth championships were found. It appears to be critical to have a sufficient amount of accumulated senior competitive experience within the team to reach the semi-final phase both for men’s and women’s national teams.

  • 5.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Costa, Pablo B.
    Human Performance Laboratory, Center for Sport Performance, Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Fullerton, CA, USA.
    Effects of Training with an Agility Ladder on Sprint, Agility, and Dribbling Performance in Youth Soccer Players2020In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of coordination training using an agility ladder compared with a control group on physical fitness and technical performance in youth soccer players. Eighteen male youth soccer players (age: 12.2 ± 0.4 years; body height: 158.3 ± 10.8 cm; body mass: 45.0 ± 8.0 kg) were randomly assigned to an agility ladder group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 8). The intervention program was carried out three times a week over six weeks. Before and after the training period, the 10 m sprint, 20 m sprint, dribbling speed test, agility test, and slalom dribbling test performances were assessed. Within-group analysis showed significant improvements (p < 0.005) in 10 m and 20 m sprint performance from the pre- to the post-test for the agility ladder group (-2.39% and -2.10%) and the control group (-2.54% and -1.44%). No significant differences (p > 0.005) were found from the pre- to the post-test in the dribbling speed test, agility test, slalom dribbling test, and skill index. In the between-group analysis, there were no differences between the agility ladder group and the control group in any variable. In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest coordination training with an agility ladder does not seem to be effective to improve physical fitness and dribbling. Therefore, this information could be beneficial to players and coaches for programming tasks during soccer training sessions.

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  • 6.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain.
    Test–Retest Reliability of Skill Tests in the F-MARC Battery for Youth Soccer Players2019In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, ISSN 0031-5125, E-ISSN 1558-688X, Vol. 126, no 5, p. 1006-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to evaluate the test–retest reliability of soccer skill tests belonging to the F-MARC test battery. To avoid bias during talent identification and development, coaches and scouts should be using reliable tests for assessing soccer-specific skills in young male players. Fifty-two U-14 outfield male soccer players performed F-MARC soccer skill tests on two occasions, separated by 7 days. After familiarization, we administered two trial sessions of five skill tests: speed dribbling, juggling, shooting, passing, and heading. We assessed absolute reliability by expressing the standard error of measurement as a coefficient of variation with 95% limits of agreement, and we assessed relative reliability with the intraclass correlation coefficient and with Pearson’s correlation (r). The results demonstrated satisfactory relative and absolute reliability for speed dribbling, right foot juggling, short passing, shooting a dead ball right, shooting from a pass, heading in front, and heading right. However, reliability values for left foot juggling, chest-head-foot juggling, head-left-foot-right foot-chest-head juggling, long pass, and shooting a dead ball left tests were not strong enough to suggest their usage by coaches in training or sport scientists in research.

  • 7.
    Penedo-Jamardo, Erik
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    The impact of different recovery times between matches on physical and technical performance according to playing positions2017In: International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, ISSN 2474-8668, E-ISSN 1474-8185, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 271-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores the influence of playing with different recovery times between matches on physical activity and technical performance. The sample was composed by 4496 professional players who participated in German professional league (Deutsche Fußball Liga – DFL) during the season 2011–2012. Data were collected using a semi-automatic optical tracking system (VISTRACK, by Impire Corp., Germany). Differences on work rate profiles of soccer players were analysed for the following variables: total distance covered, number of fast runs, number of sprints and percentage of successful passes. The main finding of this study suggests that the total distance covered, the number of fast runs and the number of sprints decreased in professional soccer players in microcycles with length of <4 days during the mid-season. Central defenders, external defenders and external midfielders covered less total distance in microcycles of <4 days, and this effect was more evident during the mid-season. During three-day microcycles in comparison to four-day cycles, central defenders and external defenders reduced the total distance covered. No differences were observed between teams according to the team quality and match location. Coaches should pay extra attention to adapt recovery strategy according to playing position and period of season.

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