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  • 1.
    Adamovic, Tatjana
    et al.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Human & Mol Genet Ctr, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Hamta, Achmad
    Univ Gothenburg, CMB Genet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Roshani, Leyla
    Univ Gothenburg, CMB Genet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lü, Xuschun
    Univ Gothenburg, CMB Genet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Röhme, Dan
    Univ Gothenburg, CMB Genet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Helou, Khalil
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Levan, Göran
    Univ Gothenburg, CMB Genet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rearrangement and allelic imbalance on chromosome 5 leads to homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A/2B tumor suppressor gene region in rat endometrial cancer2008Ingår i: Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, ISSN 2210-7762, E-ISSN 2210-7770, Vol. 184, nr 1, s. 9-21Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The inbred BDII rat is a valuable experimental model for the genetic analysis of hormone-dependent endometrial adenocarcinoma (EAC). One common aberration detected previously by comparative genomic hybridization in rat EAC is loss affecting mostly the middle part of rat chromosome 5 (RNO5). First, we applied an RNO5-specific painting probe and four region-specific gene probes onto tumor cell metaphases from 21 EACs, and found that rearrangements involving RNO5 were common. The copy numbers of loci situated on RNO5 were found to be reduced, particularly for the CDKN2A/2B locus. Second, polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed with 22 genes and markers and homozygous deletions of the CDKN2A exon 1β and CDKN2B genes were detected in 13 EACs (62%) and of CDKN2A exon 1α in 12 EACs (57%) Third, the occurrence of allelic imbalance in RNO5 was analyzed using 39 microsatellite markers covering the entire chromosome and frequent loss of heterozygosity was detected. Even more intriguing was the repeated finding of allele switching in a narrow region of 7 Mb across the CDKN2A/2B locus. We conclude that genetic events affecting the middle part of RNO5 (including bands 5q31q33 and the CDKN2A locus) contribute to the development of EAC in rat, with the CDKN2A locus having a primary role.

  • 2.
    Ahmed, Bulbul
    et al.
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Monzur
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Islam, Rafiul
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Kumar Saha, Ananda
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    A review on natural sweetener plant - Stevia having medical and commercial importance2011Ingår i: Agronomy Journal, ISSN 0002-1954, Vol. 73, nr 1-2, s. 75-91Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Stevia is a perennial herb that belongs to the Asteraceae family. It is a natural sweetener plant and estimated to be 300 times sweeter than cane sugar. The leaves of stevia are the source of diterpene glycosides, viz. stevioside and rebaudioside. Stevioside is regenerated as a valuable natural sweetening agent because of its relatively good taste and chemical stability. Now it is being cultivated in Japan, Taiwan, Philippines, Hawaii, Malaysia and overall South America for food and pharmaceutical products. Products can be added to tea and coffee, cooked or baked goods, processed foods and beverages, fruit juices,

  • 3.
    Ahmed, Bulbul
    et al.
    Rajshahi University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Khatun, Mansura
    Rajshahi University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Monzur
    Rajshahi University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Islam, Rafiul
    Rajshahi University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Biswas, Manosh
    Rajshahi University, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Establishment of an Indirect Genetic Transformation Method for Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Bangladesh2011Ingår i: Journal of Central European Agriculture, ISSN 1332-9049, E-ISSN 1332-9049, Vol. 12, nr 3, s. 519-528Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a small flowering plant belonging to the Brassicaceae family, which is adopted as a model plant for genetic research. Agrobacterium tumifaciensmediated transformation method for A. thaliana ecotype Bangladesh was established. Leaf discs of A. thaliana were incubated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 containing chimeric nos. nptII. nos and intron-GUS genes. Following inoculation and co-cultivation, leaf discs were cultured on selection medium containing 50 mg/l kanamycin + 50 mg/l cefotaxime + 1.5 mg/l NAA and kanamycin resistant shoots were induced from the leaf discs after two weeks. Shoot regeneration was achieved after transferring the tissues onto fresh medium of the same combination. Finally, the shoots were rooted on MS medium containing 50 mg/l kanamycin. Incorporation and expression of the transgenes were confirmed by PCR analysis. Using this protocol, transgenic A. thaliana plants can be obtained and indicates that genomic transformation in higher plants is possible through insertion of desired gene. Although Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation is established for A. thaliana, this study was the conducted to transform A. thaliana ecotype Bangladesh.

  • 4.
    Alade, Larry
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts.
    Barbosa, Alexandra
    ANICP.
    Bartolino, Valerio
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Beggs, Steven
    Agri-food and Biosciences Institute.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Clarke, Maurice
    Marine Institute Rinville.
    Coers, Aukje
    Pelagic RAC Secretariat.
    Deroba, Jonathan
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
    Dickey-Collas, Mark
    Wageningen IMARES.
    Enberg, Katja
    Institute of Marine Research.
    Gårdmark, Anna
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Gudmundsdóttir, Asta
    Marine Research Institute.
    Hansson, Sture
    University of Stockholm.
    Hatfield, Emma
    Marine Scotland Science Marine Laboratory.
    Hintzen, Niels
    Wageningen IMARES.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Hoines, Åge
    Institute of Marine Research.
    Arge Jacobsen, Jan
    Faroe Marine Research Institute.
    Keating, James
    Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology.
    Krysov, Alexander
    Knipovich Polar Research Institute of Marine Fisheries and Oceanography (PINRO).
    Maersk Lusseau, Susan
    Marine Scotland Science Marine Laboratory.
    Mäntyniemi, Samu
    University of Helsinki.
    McCulla, Alan
    Anglo North Irish Fish Producers' Organization.
    Miller, David
    Wageningen IMARES.
    Mosegård, Henrik
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources.
    O'Donoghue, Sean
    Killybegs Fishermen's Organization Ltd..
    Olesen, Christian
    Danish Pelagic Producers' Organization.
    Payne, Mark
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute.
    Power, Michael
    St Andrew's Biological Station.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute.
    Riveiro, Isabel
    Instituto Español de Oceanografia Centro .
    Roel, Beatriz
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science.
    Rohlf, Norbert
    Johann Heinrich von Thünen-Institute Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries Institute for Sea Fisheries.
    Schoute, Barbara
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.
    Schön, Pieter-Jan
    Agri-food and Biosciences Institute.
    Silva, Alexandra
    INRB-IPIMAR.
    Timoshenko, Nikolay
    AtlantNIRO.
    Trenkel, Verena
    Ifremer Nantes Centre.
    Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Pelagic Stocks (WKPELA 2012), 13–17 February 2012 Copenhagen, Denmark2012Rapport (Refereegranskat)
  • 5.
    Ali, Nurshad
    et al.
    Rajshahi University.
    Hoque, Ashraful
    Rajshahi University.
    Haque, Abedul
    Rajshahi University.
    Abdus Salam, Kazi
    Rajshahi University.
    Karim, Rezaul
    Rajshahi University.
    Rahman, Aminur
    Rajshahi University.
    Islam, Khairul
    Rajshahi University.
    Alam Saud, Zahangir
    Rajshahi University.
    Khalek, Abdul
    Rajshahi University.
    Azim Akhand, Anwarul
    Dhaka University.
    Hossain, Mostaque
    Rajshahi Medical College Hospital.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Karim, Rezaul
    Islamic University, Kushtia.
    Miyataka, Hideki
    Tokushima Bunri University.
    Himeno, Seiichiro
    Tokushima Bunri University.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Rajshahi University.
    Association between arsenic exposure and plasma cholinesterase activity: a population based study in Bangladesh2010Ingår i: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 9, s. 36-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Arsenic is a potent pollutant that has caused an environmental catastrophe in certain parts of the world including Bangladesh where millions of people are presently at risk due to drinking water contaminated by arsenic. Chronic arsenic exposure has been scientifically shown as a cause for liver damage, cancers, neurological disorders and several other ailments. The relationship between plasma cholinesterase (PChE) activity and arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. However, decreased PChE activity has been found in patients suffering liver dysfunction, heart attack, cancer metastasis and neurotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the PChE activity in individuals exposed to arsenic via drinking water in Bangladesh.

    Methods: A total of 141 Bangladeshi residents living in arsenic endemic areas with the mean arsenic exposure of 14.10 ± 3.27 years were selected as study subjects and split into tertile groups based on three water arsenic concentrations: low (< 129 μg/L), medium (130-264 μg/L) and high (> 265 μg/L). Study subjects were further sub-divided into two groups (≤50 μg/L and > 50 μg/L) based on the recommended upper limit of water arsenic concentration (50 μg/L) in Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected from the study subjects by venipuncture and arsenic concentrations in drinking water, hair and nail samples were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PChE activity was assayed by spectrophotometer.

    Results: Arsenic concentrations in hair and nails were positively correlated with the arsenic levels in drinking water. Significant decreases in PChE activity were observed with increasing concentrations of arsenic in water, hair and nails. The average levels of PChE activity in low, medium and high arsenic exposure groups were also significantly different between each group. Lower levels of PChE activity were also observed in the > 50 μg/L group compared to the ≤50 μg/L group. Moreover, PChE activity was significantly decreased in the skin (+) symptoms group compared to those without (-).

    Conclusions: We found a significant inverse relationship between arsenic exposure and PChE activity in a human population in Bangladesh. This research demonstrates a novel exposure-response relationship between arsenic and PChE activity which may explain one of the biological mechanisms through which arsenic exerts its neuro-and hepatotoxicity in humans.

  • 6.
    Almqvist, Gustaf
    et al.
    University of Stockholm, Stockholm Sweden.
    Andersen, Michael
    Danish Fishermen’s Association, Fredericia, Denmark.
    Willestofte Berg, Casper
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Broadgate, Wendy
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bryan, Meaghan
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, United States.
    Campana, Steven
    Fisheries and Oceans Canada Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Canada.
    Cardinale, Max
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Dierking, Jan
    Leibniz-Institut für Meereswissenschaften, Kiel, Germany.
    von Dorrien, Christian
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Efimov, Yuri
    Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries & Oceanography (VNIRO), Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Department of Inland Fisheries, Silkeborg, Denmark.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Hüssy, Karin
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Johansson, Reine
    Baltic Sea Advisory Council, Dyrön, Sweden.
    Jonusas, Stanislovas
    DGMare, Brussels, Belgium.
    Kornelius, George
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR) 8 Daugavgrivas Str. Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Köster, Fritz
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Kraak, Sarah
    Thünen Institute, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Large, Scott
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Larsson, Staffan
    Swedish Cod Fishermen’s Producer Organisation, Lycke, Sweden.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Maguire, Jean-Jacques
    Godefroy, Quebec, Canada.
    Mosegaard, Henrik
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Anders
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Stepputtis, Daniel
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Stern, Edward
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Strehlow, Harry Vincent
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Svedäng, Henrik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Trenkel, Verena
    Ifremer Nantes Centre, Nantes, France.
    Wæver Pedersen, Martin
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Zimmermann, Christopher
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Cod Stocks (WKBALTCOD)2015Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Cod Stocks (WKBALTCOD), chaired by External Chair Jean-Jacques Maguire, Canada and ICES Chair Marie Storr-Paulsen, Denmark, and attended by two invited external experts Verena Trenkel, France and Meaghan Bryan, USA met in Rostock, Germany, 2–6 March 2015 with 39 participants and six countries represented. The objective of WKBALTCOD was to evaluate the appropriateness of data and methods to determine stock status and investigate meth-ods appropriate to use in the single-stock assessment for the cod stock in SD 22–24 and cod in SD 25–32 in the Baltic. Participants in the workshop were a large group with diverse backgrounds representing the industry, fisheries, NGOs, managers and scientists.The single-stock analytic assessment of the eastern Baltic stock was not accepted by the assessment working group (WGBFAS) in 2014 due to severe problems with the input data. The advice for the eastern Baltic cod was, therefore, based on the ICES approach for data-limited stocks. As an outcome ICES decided to establish a bench-mark for both cod stocks and to scope an integrated assessment for the Baltic cod stocks. The first meeting (WKSIBCA) was therefore meant to introduce the interces-sional work conducted since the assessment working group in April 2014, and to reach some conclusions on how to proceed both in the short term (Benchmark in March 2015) and longer term (2–3 years) and was seen as a data compilation work-shop, there is produced a separate report from this workshop. The WKBALTCOD was the 2nd meeting in the benchmark process and was intended to come up with a final stock assessment method, stock annex and input data for both stocks. As it was not possible to reach conclusive decision on the final model to be used for the east Baltic cod stock during the benchmark meeting and as more work on the preferable models was needed, it was decided by the ACOM leadership to prolong the bench-mark process until the assessment working group meeting in April 2015. This deci-sion has led to a relatively long process partly mixed with the assessment working group WGBFAS.It became clear during the benchmark process that although large effort has been put into explaining the underlying processes leading to the changes in the Baltic ecosys-tem, there is still some lack of understanding of the present situation in the eastern Baltic cod stock. Therefore, it was not possible to reach firm conclusions on the final model to be used and therefore not possible to set reference points. It was decided to continue to explore the most promising models and to continue to improve the input data until the assessment working group started in April.The main challenges still to be solved for the Eastern Baltic cod stock is the quantifi-cation of increased natural mortality and decrease in growth. Through several presentations during the workshop (both WKSIBCA and WKBALTCOD) it became clear that natural mortality very likely has increased in later years, due to decreased condition and increased parasite infection. A decrease in growth also seems plausible duo to a decrease in condition and/or selectivity-induced mortality of the largest in-dividuals. However, as none of these parameters are easily estimated, especially with the severe ageing problems, different model assumptions made the output very shaky.For the western Baltic cod, stock identification issues were examined in area SD 24, the intermediate area: based on otolith characteristics and genetics. Due to the results showing a large proportion of east cod in this area, it was decided to split the catch2 | ICES WKBALTCOD REPORT 2015and survey from SD 24 into either the western or eastern Baltic cod stock. It was pos-sible to derive proportions of eastern and western cod in SD 24 back to the mid-1990s.For the western Baltic cod stock a modelled survey indices was included in the as-sessment covering the western part of SD 24 and Area 22+23 and based on a smoothed ALK.Both cod stocks have in the past used commercial tuning fleet to have a better cov-ered of older age groups. It was decided to abound this time-series duo quality issues such as a limited coverage and problems with technical creeping.WKBALTCOD was not able to explore and define reference points for the Western Baltic cod stock during the meeting due to time constraints, but these were calculated and decided by correspondence after the meeting. The recent protocols on estimation procedures developed by WKMSYREF3 for stocks with a full analytical assessment and for data-limited stocks served as objective guidelines to obtain reference point estimates.

  • 7.
    Andersen, Michael
    et al.
    Danish Fishermen’s Association Fredericia, Denmark.
    Arula, Timo
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Clink, Sally
    Baltic Sea Regional Advisory Council, Denmark.
    Collie, Jeremy
    University of Rhode Island, USA.
    Eckeskog, Magnus
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Sweden.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Pehr E.
    Swedish Fisherman’s Federation Fiskets Hus, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Russian Federation.
    Gröhsler, Thomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Poland.
    Howell, Daniel
    Institute of Marine Research, Norway.
    Jepsena, Ilona
    European Commission, Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Belgium.
    Johansson, Reine J.
    Swedish Fishermen´s Federation, Sweden.
    Janusas, Stanislovas
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Belgium.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Russian Federation.
    Klaas, Kunnar
    Ministry of the Environment of Estonia, Estonia.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thûnen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Linke, Sebastian
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish Unniversity of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Poland.
    Maguire, Jean-Jacques
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Canada.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Plaganyi, Eva
    CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR), Australia.
    Plikshs, Maris
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Reeves, Stuart
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries , Belgium.
    Rindorf, Anna
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Storr- Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Strehlow, Harry V.
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Vinther, Morten
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Multispecies Assessments (WKBALT): 4–8 February 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark2013Rapport (Refereegranskat)
  • 8.
    Annett, Judith
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Berglund, Stefan
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Increasing Societal Well-Being Through Enhanced Empathy Using Computer Games2015Ingår i: Well-Being in Contemporary Society / [ed] Johnny H. Søraker, Jan-Willem Van der Rijt, Jelle de Boer, Pak-Hang Wong & Philip Brey, Springer, 2015, s. 135-155Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research suggests that the well-being of both individuals and society in general may have a neurobiological basis linked to empathy. This raises the issue of available routes for enhancing empathy (through interventions such as education, training, pharmacology, etc.). One of the most important features of the human brain, especially of the brains of children and teenagers, is its plasticity. Millions of children and teenagers spend many hours every day playing computer games. Many computer games include different forms of violence and aggression and there has been extensive research that indicates that there is a correlation between playing these games, aggression, and reduced disposition to pro-social behaviors. However, much less research has been conducted on the potential effects of pro-social and non-violent computer games. Since there is not yet a comprehensive model of the possible causal relationships between playing such games and neuropsychological function, neuroendocrine function (e.g. oxytocin release), empathy, pro-social behaviors, and individual and societal well-being, we provide a basic theoretical framework for empirical research on these issues. The aim of this framework is ultimately to establish not only correlational evidence, but to allow the development of experimental protocols to meaningfully examine the causal relationships and mechanisms.

  • 9.
    Aps, R.
    et al.
    University of Tartu.
    Fetissov, M.
    University of Tartu.
    Holmgren, Noel
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Kuikka, S.
    University of Helsinki.
    Central Baltic Sea herring: effect of environmental trends and fishery management2011Ingår i: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development VIII / [ed] Y. Villacampa & C. A. Brebbia, Southampton: WIT Press, 2011, s. 69-80Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertainty is an endemic condition of the Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus membras, L) fishery management. It is a condition exacerbated by the fishing fleet overcapacity and consequent exploitation of the herring stock at a level believed to be unsustainable. Some sources of uncertainty are mainly related to biology and fishing technique: the unsolved problem of herring assessment and management units, the recruitment–environment relationship and the reduction in mean weights-at-age, uncertain ageing of fish, the problem of unaccounted fishing mortality caused by the fish selection through the trawl net. Fishing fleet overcapacity is believed to be behind of the regulatory overfishing when setting the Total Allowable Catches (TACs) higher than the scientific advice (decision overfishing) and tolerating the extensive underreporting of catches (implementation overfishing). Two scenarios for the Central Baltic Sea herring fishery management options are constructed and the Bayesian networks are used to represent and update uncertainties encountered in the process of the management related situation assessment. First scenario represents the current status of the fishery management resulting in fishing mortality (F) higher than FMSY – the fishing mortality that corresponds to the Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). The second scenario demonstrates the assumed potential impact of economic incentives (e.g.zoning, individual transferable quotas (ITQs), territorial use rights etc.) on the reduction of excessive fishing capacity and bringing actual fishing mortality closer to FMSY.

  • 10.
    Aps, R.
    et al.
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Fetissov, M.
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Holmgren, Noel
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Kuikka, S.
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Fisheries management: from linear to collaborative science-policy interface2011Ingår i: Management of Natural Resources, Sustainable Development and Ecological Hazards III / [ed] C. A. Brebbia, S. S. Zubir, WIT Press, 2011, s. 3-14Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The context of fisheries management, according to recent studies, tends to be complex, uncertain and controversial and it cannot be adequately addressed based on work done within the “linear” science-policy interface (SPI). It is believed that moving towards a more participatory and “collaborative” SPI model would favour implementation of more efficient economic incentives to reduce the fishing fleet capacity and bring the actual fishing mortality closer to the levels considered to be sustainable. Focusing the participatory research basically on fish biology and fish stock assessment seems to be too narrow while, on the other hand, it does not embrace many other important issues of contemporary fisheries management. It is suggested that further involvement of stakeholders into the full-scale bio-economic modelling based participatory research would contribute to better understanding of the dynamics of human natural interface concerned and, consequently, would improve the consensus between different interests.

  • 11.
    Asp, Julia
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Clin Chem & Transfus Med, Inst Biomed, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Synnergren, Jane
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Jonsson, Marianne
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Clin Chem & Transfus Med, Inst Biomed, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Dellgren, Goran
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden / Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jeppsson, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden / Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Comparison of human cardiac gene expression profiles in paired samples of right atrium and left ventricle collected in vivo2012Ingår i: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 44, nr 1, s. 89-98Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Asp J, Synnergren J, Jonsson M, Dellgren G, Jeppsson A. Comparison of human cardiac gene expression profiles in paired samples of right atrium and left ventricle collected in vivo. Physiol Genomics 44: 89-98, 2012. First published November 15, 2011; doi: 10.1152/physiolgenomics.00137.2011.-Studies of expressed genes in human heart provide insight into both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. This is of importance for extended understanding of cardiac function as well as development of new therapeutic drugs. Heart tissue for gene expression studies is generally hard to obtain, particularly from the ventricles. Since different parts of the heart have different functions, expression profiles should likely differ between these parts. The aim of the study was therefore to compare the global gene expression in cardiac tissue from the more accessible auricula of the right atrium to expression in tissue from the left ventricle. Tissue samples were collected from five men undergoing aortic valve replacement or coronary artery bypass grafting. Global gene expression analysis identified 542 genes as differentially expressed between the samples extracted from these two locations, corresponding to similar to 2% of the genes covered by the microarray; 416 genes were identified as abundantly expressed in right atrium, and 126 genes were abundantly expressed in left ventricle. Further analysis of the differentially expressed genes according to available annotations, information from curated pathways and known protein interactions, showed that genes with higher expression in the ventricle were mainly associated with contractile work of the heart. Transcription in biopsies from the auricula of the right atrium on the other hand indicated a wider area of functions, including immunity and defense. In conclusion, our results suggest that biopsies from the auricula of the right atrium may be suitable for various genetic studies, but not studies directly related to muscle work.

  • 12.
    Asplund, Annika
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pradip, Arvind
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden / Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark.
    van Giezen, Mariska
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Aspegren, Anders
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Choukair, Helena
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rehnström, Marie
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Susanna
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ghosheh, Nidal
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    El Hajjam, Dorra
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Sandra
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden / Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Susanna
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Benecke, Jörg
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Butron, Mariela
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wigander, Annelie
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Noaksson, Karin
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. AstraZeneca R&D, GMD CVMD GMed, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Björquist, Petter
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden / NovaHep AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Edsbagge, Josefina
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Küppers-Munther, Barbara
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Arvid Wallgrens Backe 20, 413 46, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    One Standardized Differentiation Procedure Robustly Generates Homogenous Hepatocyte Cultures Displaying Metabolic Diversity from a Large Panel of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells2016Ingår i: Stem Cell Reviews, ISSN 1550-8943, E-ISSN 1558-6804, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. 90-104Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Human hepatocytes display substantial functional inter-individual variation regarding drug metabolizing functions. In order to investigate if this diversity is mirrored in hepatocytes derived from different human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) lines, we evaluated 25 hPSC lines originating from 24 different donors for hepatic differentiation and functionality. Homogenous hepatocyte cultures could be derived from all hPSC lines using onestandardized differentiation procedure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a standardized hepatic differentiation procedure that is generally applicable across a large panel of hPSC lines without any adaptations to individual lines. Importantly, with regard to functional aspects, such as Cytochrome P450 activities, we observed that hepatocytes derived from different hPSC lines displayed inter-individual variation characteristic for primary hepatocytes obtained from different donors, while these activities were highly reproducible between repeated experiments using the same line. Taken together, these data demonstrate the emerging possibility to compile panels of hPSC-derived hepatocytes of particular phenotypes/genotypes relevant for drug metabolism and toxicity studies. Moreover, these findings are of significance for applications within the regenerative medicine field, since our stringent differentiation procedure allows the derivation of homogenous hepatocyte cultures from multiple donors which is a prerequisite for the realization of future personalized stem cell based therapies.

  • 13.
    Asplund, Annika
    et al.
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Andersson, Christian X.
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Küppers-Munther, Barbara
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A novel maintenance medium extends the life-span and enables long term applications for both human primary hepatocytes and human pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocytes in conventional 2D cultures2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 14.
    Awe, Julius Adebayo
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Canada / Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Xu, Mark Chu
    University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Canada .
    Wechsler, Janine
    ScreenCell, Paris, France / Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France .
    Benali-Furet, Naoual
    ScreenCell, Paris, France.
    Cayre, Yvon E
    ScreenCell, Paris, France / Hôpital Robert Debré and Pierre, Marie Curie University, Paris, France .
    Saranchuk, Jeff
    University of Manitoba, Canada .
    Drachenberg, Darrel
    University of Manitoba, Canada .
    Mai, Sabine
    University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Canada .
    Three-Dimensional Telomeric Analysis of Isolated Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) Defines CTC Subpopulations2013Ingår i: Translational Oncology, ISSN 1944-7124, E-ISSN 1936-5233, Vol. 6, nr 1, s. 51-65Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been identified with the potential to serve as suitable biomarkers for tumor stage and progression, but the availability of effective isolation technique(s) coupled with detailed molecular characterization have been the challenges encountered in making CTCs clinically relevant. For the first time, we combined isolation of CTCs using the ScreenCell filtration technique with quantitative analysis of CTC telomeres by TeloView. This resulted in the identification and molecular characterization of different subpopulations of CTCs in the same patient. Three-dimensional (3D) telomeric analysis was carried out on isolated CTCs of 19 patients that consisted of four different tumor types, namely, prostate, colon, breast, melanoma, and one lung cancer cell line. With telomeric analysis of the filter-isolated CTCs, the level of chromosomal instability (CIN) of the CTCs can be determined. Our study shows that subpopulations of CTCs can be identified on the basis of their 3D telomeric properties.

  • 15.
    Ayukekbong, James A.
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, M. E.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vansarla, Goutham
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Tah, F.
    Camyaids Institute of Laboratory Diagnosis and Clinical Research, Douala, Cameroon.
    Nkuo-Akenji, T.
    Faculty of Science Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon.
    Lindh, M.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergström, T.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Monitoring of seasonality of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon by real-time PCR: an exploratory study2014Ingår i: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 142, nr 7, s. 1393-1402Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the seasonal fluctuation of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon. Two hundred participants aged between 1 and 69 years were prospectively followed up. Each participant provided monthly faecal samples over a 12-month period. A total of 2484 samples were tested using multiplex real-time PCR assay for the detection of norovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus. The effect of weather variables and risk factors were analysed by Pearson correlation and bivariate analysis. Overall, enterovirus was the most commonly detected virus (216% of specimens), followed by norovirus (39%) and rotavirus (04%). Norovirus and enterovirus were detected throughout the year with a peak of norovirus detection at the beginning of the rainy season and a significant alternation of circulation of norovirus genogroups from one month to the next. Age <5 years and consumption of tap water were risk factors for norovirus infection. Better understanding of factors influencing transmission and seasonality may provide insights into the relationship between physical environment and risk of infection for these viruses.

  • 16.
    Banks, H. T.
    et al.
    Center for Research in Scientific Computation North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Banks, J. E.
    Undergraduate Research Opportunities Center (UROC) California State University, Monterey Bay Seaside, CA, USA.
    Bommarco, Riccardo
    Department of Ecology Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Uppsala, Sweden.
    Curtsdotter, Alva
    Department of Ecology Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Ecology Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Uppsala, Sweden.
    Laubmeier, A. N.
    Center for Research in Scientific Computation North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Parameter estimation for an allometric food web model2017Ingår i: International journal of pure and applied mathematics, ISSN 1311-8080, E-ISSN 1314-3395, Vol. 114, nr 1, s. 143-160Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of mechanistic models to natural systems is of interest to ecological researchers. We use the mechanistic Allometric Trophic Network (ATN) model, whichis well-studied for controlled and theoretical systems, to describe the dynamics of the aphidRhopalosiphum padi in an agricultural field. We diagnose problems that arise in a first attemptat a least squares parameter estimation on this system, including formulation of the modelfor the inverse problem and information content present in the data. We seek to establishwhether the field data, as it is currently collected, can support parameter estimation for theATN model.

  • 17.
    Bari, M. A.
    et al.
    University of Rajshahi.
    Islam, W.
    University of Rajshahi.
    Khan, A. R.
    University of Rajshahi.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Solanum torvum (Solanaceae)2010Ingår i: International Journal of Agriculture & Biology, ISSN 1560-8530, Vol. 12, nr 3, s. 386-390Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaves, stem, roots and inflorescence of Solanum torvum Sw. were extracted in two different organic solvents (chloroform & methanol). Antibacterial and antifungal effects of the extracts were tested on fifteen (six Gram positive & nine Gram negative) human  pathogenic  bacteria  and  on  eight  pathogenic  fungi.  Methanolic  extracts  of  roots  of  S.  torvum  exhibited  promising antibacterial  and  antifungal  effects  on  all  organisms  tested  in  comparison  with  that  observed  in  the  leaves,  stems  and inflorescence extracts. The toxicity of the extracts was in the following order; root>stem>inflorescence>leaf. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of methanolic extract of roots of S. torvum were in the range between 64-128 µg mL -1 . Chloroform  extracts  of  roots  were  more  toxic  (LC 50  35.4629  ppm)  than  other  extracts  analyzed  in  Brine  shrimp  test.  In conclusion, S. torvum appears to be an attractive material for the development of antimicrobial drugs and environment friendly biopesticides.

  • 18.
    Bays, Harold E.
    et al.
    Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center Inc., Louisville, KY, USA.
    Sartipy, Peter
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Global Medicines Development, CVMD, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Xu, John
    Biometrics and Information Sciences, AstraZeneca, Gaithersburg, MD, USA.
    Sjöström, Carl David
    Global Medicines Development, CVMD, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Underberg, James A.
    Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine & NYU Center for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, New York, NY, USA.
    Dapagliflozin in patients with type II diabetes mellitus, with and without elevated triglyceride and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels2017Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Lipidology, ISSN 1933-2874, E-ISSN 1876-4789, Vol. 11, nr 2, s. 450-458Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dapagliflozin is a selective sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that improves glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by reducing renal glucose reabsorption.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the lipid effects of dapagliflozin 10 mg or placebo in patients with T2DM with/without baseline elevated triglyceride and reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels.

    METHODS: This was a post hoc analysis of 10 phase 3, placebo-controlled studies of dapagliflozin 10 mg (N = 2237) or placebo (N = 2164) administered for 24 weeks in patients with T2DM. Patients with elevated triglyceride (>= 150 mg/dL [1.69 mmol/L]) and reduced HDL cholesterol levels (<40 mg/dL [1.04 mmol/L] in men; <50 mg/dL [1.29 mmol/L] in women) were included (group A). The reference group (group B) included patients who did not meet the defined lipid criteria.

    RESULTS: The effects of dapagliflozin on fasting lipid profiles were generally similar in the 2 lipid groups (ie, groups A and B) and, compared with placebo, were associated with minor increases in non-HDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and HDL cholesterol levels. The effects on triglyceride levels were inconsistent. The incidence of adverse events (AEs)/serious AEs, and AEs of genital infection, urinary tract infection, volume reduction, renal function, and hypoglycemia were similar in the 2 lipid groups.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with T2DM treated with dapagliflozin experienced minor changes in lipid levels; the changes were generally similar in the 2 lipid groups. The clinical significance of these changes in lipids is unclear, especially in view of the positive effects of dapagliflozin on other cardiovascular disease risk factors. 

  • 19.
    Berg, Sofia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. IFM Theory and Modelling, Div. of Theoretical Biology, Linköping Univ., Linköping, Sweden.
    Christianou, Maria
    IFM Theory and Modelling, Div. of Theoretical Biology, Linköping Univ., Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Ebenman, Bo
    IFM Theory and Modelling, Div. of Theoretical Biology, Linköping Univ., Linköping, Sweden.
    Using sensitivity analysis to identify keystone species and keystone links in size-based food webs2011Ingår i: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 120, nr 4, s. 510-519Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Human-induced alterations in the birth and mortality rates of species and in the strength of interactions within and between species can lead to changes in the structure and resilience of ecological communities. Recent research points to the importance of considering the distribution of body sizes of species when exploring the response of communities to such perturbations. Here, we present a new size-based approach for assessing the sensitivity and elasticity of community structure (species equilibrium abundances) and resilience (rate of return to equilibrium) to changes in the intrinsic growth rate of species and in the strengths of species interactions. We apply this approach on two natural systems, the pelagic communities of the Baltic Sea and Lake Vättern, to illustrate how it can be used to identify potential keystone species and keystone links. We find that the keystone status of a species is closely linked to its body size. The analysis also suggests that communities are structurally and dynamically more sensitive to changes in the effects of prey on their consumers than in the effects of consumers on their prey. Moreover, we discuss how community sensitivity analysis can be used to study and compare the fragility of communities with different body size distributions by measuring the mean sensitivity or elasticity over all species or all interaction links in a community. We believe that the community sensitivity analysis developed here holds some promise for identifying species and links that are critical for the structural and dynamic robustness of ecological communities.

  • 20.
    Berg, Sofia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Dept of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Div. of Theoretical Biology, Linköping Univ., Linköping, Sweden.
    Pimenov, Aexander
    Weierstrass Inst., Berlin, Germany / Environmental Research Inst., Univ. College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
    Palmer, Catherine
    Weierstrass Inst., Berlin, Germany.
    Emmerson, Mark
    School of Biological Sciences, Queen's Univ. Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Dept of Ecology, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ecological communities are vulnerable to realistic extinction sequences2015Ingår i: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 124, nr 4, s. 486-496Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 21.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Boje, Jesper
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Degel, Henrik
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Eero, Margit
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Management Systems, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Grygiel, Wlodzimierz
    Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Sweden.
    Horbowy, Jan
    Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Karpushevskaia, Anastasiia
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Latvian Fish Resources Agency, Riga, Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research, Institute Kotka Unit, Kotka, Finland.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute Turku Game and Fisheries Research, Turku, Finland.
    Statkus, Romas
    Division of fishery research and science, Fishery service under Ministry of Agriculture, Klaipeda, Lithuania.
    Stoetera, Sven
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Report of the Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS): 14-21 April 2015, ICES HQ, Copenhagen, Denmark2015Rapport (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS) met 14-21 April 2015 (Chair: Mare Storr-Paulsen, Denmark), with 28 participants and 9 countries represented. The objective of WGBFAS was to assess the status of the following stocks:

    1 ) Sole in Division IIIa, SDs 20-22

    2 ) Cod in Kattegat, Cod in SD 22-24, Cod in SD 25-32

    3 ) Herring in SD 25-27, 28.2, 29 and 32, Herring in SD 28.1 (Gulf of Riga), Herring in SD 30, Herring SD 31.

    4 ) Sprat in SD 22-32

    5 ) Plaice 21-23, Plaice 2425

    6 ) Flounder 22-23; 24-25; 26+28 and 27+29-32, Brill 2232, Dab 2232, and Turbot 2232 (survey trends)

    WGBFAS also identified the data needed, for next year’s data call with some suggestions for improvements in the data call as well as in InterCatch. The report contains an introduction with the summary of other WGs relevant for the WGBFAS, country specific fishery description, the methods used, and ecosystem considerations. The results of the analytical stock assessment or survey trends for the species listed above are then presented with all the stocks with the same species in the same sections. The report ends with references, list of Working Documents, recommendations and Stock Annexes. In first quarter 2015 the Baltic cod stocks and the plaice stocks were benchmarked. As a result the Baltic cod stocks now have to apply a splitting key in SD 24 were both stocks are present. This has changed the assessment from being an area based assessment to now being a stock based assessments and has implications for the advice. The principle analytical models used for the stock assessments were XSA and SAM. For most flatfishes, CPUE trends from bottom trawl surveys were presented (except plaice 2425 and her31 using relative SSB from SAM and XSA, respectively). Ecosystem changes have been analytically considered in the following stock assessments: Herring in SD 25-27, 28.2, 29 and 32, and Sprat in SD 22-32, in form of cod predation mortality. Last year a very large retrospective pattern in the Eastern Baltic cod stock caused that the WG rejected the analytic assessment. Several uncertainties in the data lead to this conclusion i.a age reading problems with large inconsistency between and within nations as well as a change in growth and natural mortality. However, even though a data compilation workshop and a benchmark have been conducted in the intermediate time it was not possible to solve the main issue on growth. The lack of knowledge on growth caused to that even the length based data required in the data call was very uncertain for the models and in the end the WG was not able to produce a better model than was presented last year which is based on survey trends. The Her-30 (Herring in the Botnian Sea) was by the working group down scaled from a category 1 stock to a category 3 stock due to the commercial tuning fleet used in the assessment having very uncertain estimates in the last couples of years. However, during the Baltic ADG an alternative assessment was suggested were the stock is still considered a category 1 stock but the last 8 years of the commercial tuning fleet was terminated. This assessment was conducted after the working group but has been included in the report.

  • 22.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Cadigan, Noel
    Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Johann-Heinrich von Thünen-Institute, Germany .
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Morgado, Cristina
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Denmark.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Trenkel, Verena
    Ifremer Nantes Centre, France.
    Report of the Inter-Benchmark Protocol for Herring in Subdivision 30 (IBP Her30): 11–15 March 2013, By correspondence2013Rapport (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Inter-Benchmark Protocol for Herring in Subdivision 30 (IBP-Her30) worked by correspondence  between  February  28  and  March  28  2013. Verena Trenkel  (France) served as Chair with invited expert Noel Cadigan (Canada). There were six participants. The objectives of the groups were to review the work carried out in response to the benchmark working group WKPELA in 2012.

  • 23.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Comparison of methods and results for the estimation of a sustainable harvest rate for the Bothnian Sea herring2012Ingår i: Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Pelagic Stocks (WKPELA 2012): 13–17 February 2012, Copenhagen, Denmark, International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) , 2012Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 24.
    Berggren, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University.
    Larsson, Dennis
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Subarachnoid haemorrhage has long-term effects on social life2011Ingår i: British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, ISSN 1747-0307, E-ISSN 2052-2800, Vol. 7, nr 1, s. 429-435Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe memory after a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) from the perspective of relatives and patients in two cohorts and also to evaluate the application of relatives' statements as a tool in nursing care and rehabilitation, in order to support the patient. Background: Cognitive sequelae due to SAH are a large disability and may influence the adjustment to daily life. Supporting patients and relatives requires knowledge concerning the patients' memory both from the perspective of patients and relatives. Method: Eleven relatives and 11 patients (Cohort 1), 11 years after the onset of an SAH and 15 relatives and 15 patients (Cohort 2) 6 years after the onset of an SAH, participated in the study. Interview questions and memory tests were used to collect data. Findings: Problems with memory, including meta-memory problems regarding relatives' statements, were common. Relatives and patients stated patients' menory in a similar manner. However, patients' statements concerning their memory corresponded in higher degree with memory test results, in comparison with relatives' statements. Conclusions: Relatives' and patients' statements are useful as tools in nursing care and rehabilitation. However, from results showing meta-memory problems and that patients' statements concerning their memory corresponded better with memory test results (in comparison with relatives' statements), it is vital to offer patients memory tests in order to prevent complications in mutual family relationships.

  • 25.
    Bergman, A.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Capio Diagnostik AB, Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde.
    Fernandez, V.
    Department of Parasitology, Mycology and Environmental Microbiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna.
    Holmström, Kjell-Ove
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Claesson, B. E. B.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Capio Diagnostik AB, Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde.
    Enroth, H.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Capio Diagnostik AB, Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde.
    Rapid identification of pathogenic yeast isolates bt real-time PCR and two-dimensional melting-point analysis2007Ingår i: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 26, nr 11, s. 813-818Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need in the clinical microbiological laboratory for rapid and reliable methods for the universal identification of fungal pathogens. Two different regions of the rDNA gene complex, the highly polymorphic ITS1 and ITS2, were amplified using primers targeting conserved regions of the 18S, 5.8S and 28S genes. After melting-point analysis of the amplified products, the Tm of the two PCR-products were plotted into a spot diagram where all the 14 tested, clinically relevant yeasts separated with good resolution. Real-time amplification of two separate genes, melting-point analysis and two-dimensional plotting of Tm data can be used as a broad-range method for the identification of clinical isolates of pathogenic yeast such as Candida and Cryptococcus spp.

  • 26.
    Bergström, Lena
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholm Recilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frelat, Romain
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Haapasaari, Päivi
    University of Helsinki, Department of Environmental Sciences, Helsinki, Finland.
    Haas, Bianca
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg Germany.
    Heikinheimo, Outi
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jernberg, Susanna
    Finnish Environment Institute, Marine Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Large, Scott
    ICES, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindegren, Martin
    Centre for Ocean Life, DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Levin, Phil
    Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, USA.
    Lehikoinen, Annukka
    Helsinki University, Kotka Maritime Research Centre, Kotka, Finland.
    Möllmann, Christian
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Nordström, Marie
    Åbo Akademi University, Environmental and Marine Biology, Åbo, Finland.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Otto, Saskia
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Peltonen, Heikki
    Marine Research Centre, Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Précuchét, Laurence
    Centre for Ocean Life, DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Putnis, Ivars
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment BIOR, Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Romakkaniemi, Atso
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Oulun yliopisto, Finland.
    Suikkanen, Sanna
    Finnish Environment Institute, Marine Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Torres, Marian
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Uusitalo, Laura
    Finnish Environment Institute, Marine Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Weigel, Benjamin
    Åbo Akademi University, Environmental and Marine Biology, Åbo, Finland.
    Wesslander, Karin
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Marine Environment, Västra Frölunda, Sweden.
    Zagrodzka, Zuzanna
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Interim Report of the ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea (WGIAB): 18-22 April 2016 Helsinki, Finland2016Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea (WGIAB) meeting was held in Helsinki (Finland), 18-22 April 2016. The meeting was attended by 26 participants from five countries and chaired by Laura Uusitalo, Fin-land, Saskia Otto, Germany, Martin Lindegren, Denmark, and Lena Bergström, Swe-den. This was the first year of the new three-year Terms of Reference (ToR) for WGIAB. The main working activities in 2016 were to A) develop the trait-based ap-proach of understanding the ecosystem function, and B) explore the social-ecological system, including indicator development, revising the conceptual model, and devel-oping case studies. As a primary outcome of the ToR A, we built on our previous work on integrated ecosystem assessments (IEAs) in the Baltic Sea, but extended it beyond considering changes in abundances of a few dominant species, to accounting for community-wide changes in a number of key traits across multiple trophic levels. These traits represent various ecosystem functions upon which we derive important ecosystem services. By investigating temporal changes in the community weighted mean traits of phyto-plankton, zooplankton, zoobenthos, and fish, we demonstrated whether trait reor-ganizations at the level of entire communities occurred in the Central Baltic Sea as a result of the 1980s regime shift. Using in total 29 traits combined for all groups we found indications of two breakpoints across all four taxonomic groups over the last decades, i.e. one around 1990 and one around 2000. Further work will focus on ex-ploring the nature of the changes in trait composition and on standardizing the num-ber of traits and data types (i.e. binary, continuous or categorical) across taxonomic group.In addition, we collected data on key functional groups and abiotic variables in all main sub-basins of the Baltic Sea, setting the stage for a cross-regional comparison of temporal patterns and trends in lower trophic level in the face of recent develop-ments in climate-related drivers.With reference to Tor B, to explore how social indicators could be used in parallel with biological indicators in an integrated assessment framework, we developed a conceptual model of interrelationships between ecosystem and society. We used the model as a basis for mapping factors to be accounted for in the ecosystem-based management using the Baltic salmon and clupeid species as case studies. The models depict 1) the structure of the foodweb relevant to the target species, 2) the key com-munity level and population traits that contribute to the state of the species, 3) main pressures affecting the foodweb and their effects on the species, 4) key management measures, and 5) benefits that the species can produce for society.To support the development of Ecosystem Overview the group members evaluated the probability of occurrence and the magnitude of the effect of 15 pressures occur-ring in the Baltic Sea. The top five pressures identified were input of nutrients, in-creased temperature, decreased salinity, input of hazardous substances, and input or spread of non-indigenous species.The work will continue intersessionally and the next meeting of WGIAB is planned to be held in Lisbon, Portugal, back-to-back with WGCOMEDA and WGEAWESS.

  • 27.
    Bergström, Lena
    et al.
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Anna
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Hamrén, Henrik
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Jacob, Ute
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Kininmonth, Stuart
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Large, Scott
    ICES, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Levin, Phil
    Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, USA.
    Lehikoinen, Annukka
    Helsinki University, Kotka Maritime Research Centre, Kotka, Finland.
    Llope, Marcos
    Instituto Español de Oceanografía, Centro Oceanográfico de Cádiz, Spain.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Müller-Karulis, Bärbel
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möllmann, Christian
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Olsson, Jens
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Otto, Saskia
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Rau, Andrea
    Thuenen-Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Reid, David
    Marine Institute, Rinville, Galway, Ireland.
    Tomczak, Maciej, T.
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Torres, Marian
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food safety, Animal Health and Environment, Riga, Latvia.
    Uusitalo, Laura
    Finnish Environment Institute, Marine Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wesslander, Karin
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Marine Environment, Västra Frölunda, Sweden.
    Report of the ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea (WGIAB)2015Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea(WGIAB) was established in 2007 as a forum for developing and combining ecosystembasedmanagement efforts for the Baltic Sea. The group intends to serve as a scientificcounterpart and support for the ICES Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group(WGBFAS) as well as for efforts and projects related to Integrated Ecosystem Assessments(IEA) within ICES and HELCOM. The group works in cooperation with similargroups within the ACOM/SCICOM Steering Group on Integrated Ecosystem Assessments(SSGIEA).The 2015 WGIAB meeting was held in Cádiz, Spain, from 9–13 March, back-to-backwith the meeting of its counterpart in the Working Group on Ecosystem Assessmentof Western European Shelf Seas (WGEAWESS). The meetings had joint sessions as wellas WG specific work, and some participants effectively participated in both meetings.The WGIAB meeting was attended by 27 participants from nine countries. The meetingwas chaired by Christian Möllmann, Germany, Laura Uusitalo, Finland and Lena Bergström,Sweden.This was the last year of the ongoing three-year Terms of Reference (ToR) for WGIAB.The main working activities in 2015 were to i) conduct studies on Baltic Sea ecosystemfunctioning with the goal to publish case studies from different parts of the Baltic Seain peer-reviewed journals, ii) work on the demonstration exercise to develop ecosystem-based assessment and advice for Baltic fish stocks focusing on cod (DEMO) withmultiple approaches, iii) plan further how to integrate the social and economic aspectsmore tightly in the WGIAB work, and iv) discuss the future focus and format of theWGIAB work.The Baltic ecosystem functioning activity focused on identifying and exploring keytrends and linkages in the Baltic Sea foodweb. This was pursued by presentation andfurther discussion of ongoing intersessional work on foodweb modelling and integratedanalyses, and by exercises to develop conceptual models Baltic Sea foodwebsand the links to ecosystem function. Long-term monitoring datasets on the abiotic andbiotic parts of the Baltic Sea Proper ecosystem were updated for use in the continuedwork to develop environmental indicators for fisheries and marine management.The focus of the DEMO 3 (DEMOnstration exercise for Integrated Ecosystem Assessmentand Advice of Baltic Sea cod) was on finding a way to use the results from theDEMO1 and DEMO2 workshops in short and midterm projections/scenarios of Balticcod dynamics based on different types of modelling, as well as designing methodologyand modelling data for practical implementation of Integrated Advice for Baltic cod.The WGIAB was positively inclined towards including social and economic aspectsinto the integrated assessment. Openings to this path were provided by presentationon ongoing project work, and discussing their linkages to ecological aspects. It wasseen as crucial that experts on social and economic analysis should be included andtake an active part in the future work of the group.The group concluded that its upcoming work should focus more closely on functionaldiversity, which was identified as a recurring issue in the Baltic Sea. This approach wasalso identified as a useful connection point between scientific and management aspectsin order for the group to continue serving as a forum for developing ecosystem-basedmanagement efforts in the Baltic Sea. A focus on functional diversity was also seen as2 | ICES WGIAB REPORT 2015a potentially feasible way of bringing together management aspects for different sectors,by linking to ecosystem services concepts.The group proposed Saskia Otto, Germany and Martin Lindegren, Denmark as newincoming Chairs, together with Lena Bergström, Sweden and Laura Uusitalo, Finland.Having four Chairs is justified due to the wide scope of the group's work, as well asthe increased work load due to the planned new foci.

  • 28.
    Berthenet, Elvire
    et al.
    Swansea University, United Kingdom.
    Yahara, Koji
    National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Toyama, Japan.
    Thorell, Kaisa
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pascoe, Ben
    University of Bath, United Kingdom.
    Meric, Guillaume
    University of Bath, United Kingdom.
    Mikhail, Jane M.
    Swansea University, United Kingdom / Cardiff University, United Kingdom.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enroth, Helena
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Burette, Alain
    Centre Hospitalier Interrégional Edith Cavell/Site de la Basilique, Brussels, Belgium.
    Megraud, Francis
    Centre National de Référence des Campylobacters et des Hélicobacters, Bordeaux, France / University Bordeaux, France.
    Varon, Christine
    University Bordeaux, France.
    Atherton, John C.
    Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre and National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Smith, Sinead
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
    Wilkinson, Thomas S.
    Swansea University Medical School, Swansea University, Microbiology and Infectious Disease Group, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    Hitchings, Matthew D.
    Swansea University, United Kingdom.
    Falush, Daniel
    University of Bath, United Kingdom.
    Sheppard, Samuel K.
    University of Bath, United Kingdom.
    A GWAS on Helicobacter pylori strains points to genetic variants associated with gastric cancer risk2018Ingår i: BMC Biology, ISSN 1741-7007, E-ISSN 1741-7007, Vol. 16, nr 1, artikel-id 84Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Helicobacter pylori are stomach-dwelling bacteria that are present in about 50% of the global population. Infection is asymptomatic in most cases, but it has been associated with gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Epidemiological evidence shows that progression to cancer depends upon the host and pathogen factors, but questions remain about why cancer phenotypes develop in a minority of infected people. Here, we use comparative genomics approaches to understand how genetic variation amongst bacterial strains influences disease progression.

    RESULTS:

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on 173 H. pylori isolates from the European population (hpEurope) with known disease aetiology, including 49 from individuals with gastric cancer. We identified SNPs and genes that differed in frequency between isolates from patients with gastric cancer and those with gastritis. The gastric cancer phenotype was associated with the presence of babA and genes in the cag pathogenicity island, one of the major virulence determinants of H. pylori, as well as non-synonymous variations in several less well-studied genes. We devised a simple risk score based on the risk level of associated elements present, which has the potential to identify strains that are likely to cause cancer but will require refinement and validation.

    CONCLUSION:

    There are a number of challenges to applying GWAS to bacterial infections, including the difficulty of obtaining matched controls, multiple strain colonization and the possibility that causative strains may not be present when disease is detected. Our results demonstrate that bacterial factors have a sufficiently strong influence on disease progression that even a small-scale GWAS can identify them. Therefore, H. pylori GWAS can elucidate mechanistic pathways to disease and guide clinical treatment options, including for asymptomatic carriers.

  • 29.
    Bertilsson, Ann
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Jonsson, Annie
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Inventeringsmetodik med undervattensvideokamera för studier av stormusslors förekomst och tätheter vid vägbroar2012Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 30.
    Biswas, M. K.
    et al.
    Huazhong Agricultural University, China.
    Ahmed, M. B.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Mondal, M. A. A.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Razvy, M. A.
    Huazhong Agricultural University, China.
    Hoque, A.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Islam, R.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hossaina, M.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    In exploitation of genetic diversity in potato breeding2010Ingår i: Agronomski Glasnik (Agronomy Journal), ISSN 1848-8900, Vol. 72, nr 4-5, s. 261-276Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With a view to select divergent parents genetic diversity was estimated among twenty genotypes. Thirty F1 progenies developed by line-tester mating were studied from seedling generation to first clonal generation for five important agronomic traits. Cluster analysis reveals that the parents could be grouped into seven different clusters. Cluster means showed wide range of variation for several traits among singles as well as multi genotypic clusters. Considering diversity pattern, parents should select from cluster I, III, IV, and V for the improvement of potato. Analysis of variance revealed that all most all the sources of variation were highly significant for all the studied traits in both generations. Parents Challisha, Lalpakri, Patnai, Chamak, Sadagoti, TPS-67 and TPS-364 were found to be good general combiners for tuber yield and yield contribution traits due to their gca effects. The sca effects showed that out of 30 hybrids 12 were found to have specific combining ability for tuber yield and those hybrids also exhibited considerable heterosis for tuber yield and yield contributing traits.

  • 31.
    Blagrove, Mark
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    Hale, Sioned
    Department of Psychology, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    Lockheart, Julia
    Swansea College of Art, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Swansea, United Kingdom / Goldsmiths, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Carr, Michelle
    Department of Psychology, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    Jones, Alex
    Department of Psychology, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Testing the Empathy Theory of Dreaming: The Relationships Between Dream Sharing and Trait and State Empathy2019Ingår i: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, artikel-id 1351Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, dreams are a novel but realistic simulation of waking social life, with a mixture of characters, motivations, scenarios, and positive and negative emotions. We propose that the sharing of dreams has an empathic effect on the dreamer and on significant others who hear and engage with the telling of the dream. Study 1 tests three correlations that are predicted by the theory of dream sharing and empathy: that trait empathy will be correlated with frequency of telling dreams to others, with frequency of listening to others’ dreams, and with trait attitude toward dreams (ATD) (for which higher scores indicate positive attitude). 160 participants completed online the Toronto Empathy Questionnaire and the Mannheim Dream Questionnaire. Pearson partial correlations were conducted, with age and sex partialled out. Trait empathy was found to be significantly associated with the frequency of listening to the dreams of others, frequency of telling one’s own dreams to others, and attitude toward dreams. Study 2 tests the effects of discussing dreams on state empathy, using an adapted version of the Shen (2010) state empathy scale, for 27 pairs of dream sharers and discussers. Dream discussion followed the stages of the Ullman (1996) dream appreciation technique. State empathy of the dream discusser toward the dream sharer was found to increase significantly as a result of the dream discussion, with a medium effect size, whereas the dream sharer had a small decrease in empathy toward the discusser. A proposed mechanism for these associations and effects is taken from the robust findings in the literature that engagement with literary fiction can induce empathy toward others. We suggest that the dream acts as a piece of fiction that can be explored by the dreamer together with other people, and can thus induce empathy about the life circumstances of the dreamer. We discuss the speculation that the story-like characteristics of adult human dreams may have been selected for in human evolution, including in sexual selection, as part of the selection for emotional intelligence, empathy, and social bonding.

  • 32.
    Borg, Julia
    et al.
    Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, .
    Melander, Olle
    Malmö University Hospital, Lund University.
    Johansson, Linda
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences.
    Rehfeld, Jens F.
    Rigshospitalet, University og Copenhagen.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Malmö University Hospital, Lund University.
    Gastroparesis is associated with oxytocin deficiency, oesophageal dysmotility with hyperCCKemia, and autonomic neuropathy with hypergastrinemia2009Ingår i: BMC Gastroenterology, ISSN 1471-230X, E-ISSN 1471-230X, Vol. 9, s. Article number 17-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility and autonomic neuropathy are common problems among diabetics with largely unknown aetiology. Many peptides are involved in the autonomic nervous system regulating the GI tract. The aim of this study was to examine if concentrations of oxytocin, cholecystokinin (CCK), gastrin and vasopressin in plasma differ between diabetics with normal function and dysfunction in GI motility.

    Methods: Nineteen patients with symptoms from the GI tract who had been examined with gastric emptying scintigraphy, oesophageal manometry, and deep-breathing test were included. They further received a fat-rich meal, after which blood samples were collected and plasma frozen until analysed for hormonal concentrations.

    Results: There was an increase in postprandial oxytocin plasma concentration in the group with normal gastric emptying (p = 0.015) whereas subjects with delayed gastric emptying had no increased oxytocin secretion (p = 0.114). Both CCK and gastrin levels increased after the meal, with no differences between subjects with normal respective delayed gastric emptying. The concentration of vasopressin did not increase after the meal. In patients with oesophageal dysmotility the basal level of CCK tended to be higher (p = 0.051) and those with autonomic neuropathy had a higher area under the curve (AUC) of gastrin compared to normal subjects (p = 0.007).

    Conclusion: Reduced postprandial secretion of oxytocin was found in patients with delayed gastric emptying, CCK secretion was increased in patients with oesophageal dysmotility, and gastrin secretion was increased in patients with autonomic neuropathy. The findings suggest that disturbed peptide secretion may be part of the pathophysiology of digestive complications in diabetics.

  • 33.
    Borgmästars, Emmy
    et al.
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    de Weerd, Hendrik Arnold
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lubovac-Pilav, Zelmina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Sund, Malin
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    miRFA: an automated pipeline for microRNA functional analysis with correlation support from TCGA and TCPA expression data in pancreatic cancer2019Ingår i: BMC Bioinformatics, ISSN 1471-2105, E-ISSN 1471-2105, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 1-17, artikel-id 393Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level and are emerging as potentially important biomarkers for various disease states, including pancreatic cancer. In silico-based functional analysis of miRNAs usually consists of miRNA target prediction and functional enrichment analysis of miRNA targets. Since miRNA target prediction methods generate a large number of false positive target genes, further validation to narrow down interesting candidate miRNA targets is needed. One commonly used method correlates miRNA and mRNA expression to assess the regulatory effect of a particular miRNA. The aim of this study was to build a bioinformatics pipeline in R for miRNA functional analysis including correlation analyses between miRNA expression levels and its targets on mRNA and protein expression levels available from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) and the cancer proteome atlas (TCPA). TCGA-derived expression data of specific mature miRNA isoforms from pancreatic cancer tissue was used.

    RESULTS: Fifteen circulating miRNAs with significantly altered expression levels detected in pancreatic cancer patients were queried separately in the pipeline. The pipeline generated predicted miRNA target genes, enriched gene ontology (GO) terms and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathways. Predicted miRNA targets were evaluated by correlation analyses between each miRNA and its predicted targets. MiRNA functional analysis in combination with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis suggest that hsa-miR-885-5p could act as a tumor suppressor and should be validated as a potential prognostic biomarker in pancreatic cancer.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our miRNA functional analysis (miRFA) pipeline can serve as a valuable tool in biomarker discovery involving mature miRNAs associated with pancreatic cancer and could be developed to cover additional cancer types. Results for all mature miRNAs in TCGA pancreatic adenocarcinoma dataset can be studied and downloaded through a shiny web application at https://emmbor.shinyapps.io/mirfa/ .

  • 34.
    Browall, Sarah
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Backhaus, Erik
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Naucler, Pontus
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Galanis, Ilias
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Karin
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Diana
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Berg, Stefan
    Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Luthander, Joachim
    Department of Paediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Margareta
    Department of Paediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Spindler, Carl
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Ejdebäck, Mikael
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Trollfors, Birger
    Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Darenberg, Jessica
    Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Kalin, Mats
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Örtqvist, Åke
    Department of Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medicine, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Andersson, Rune
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henriques-Normark, Birgitta
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Dept of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clinical manifestations of invasive pneumococcal disease by vaccine and non-vaccine types2014Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 44, nr 6, s. 1646-1657Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 35.
    Bu, H.
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Rosdahl, I.
    Linköping University.
    Sun, X-F.
    Linköping University.
    Zhang, Hong
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Genotype <21CAs/≥21CAs and allele <21CAs of the MANBA gene in melanoma risk and progression in a Swedish population2009Ingår i: Molecular Medicine Reports, ISSN 1791-2997, E-ISSN 1791-3004, Vol. 2, nr 2, s. 259-263Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cutaneous melanoma is characterized by poor patient outcome in its later stages. The search for genetic markers is therefore crucial for the identification of populations at risk for melanoma. Highly polymorphic CA repeats in 3' proximity in the MANBA gene were examined by PCR-capillary electrophoresis in 185 Swedish melanoma patients and 441 tumor-free age- and gender-matched individuals. The associations of the polymorphisms with melanoma risk, the pigment phenotypes of the patients and tumor characteristics were analyzed. A significant difference in allelic distribution between melanoma patients and tumor-free individuals was observed. The frequency of the MANBA genotype <21CAs/≥21CAs was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in the controls. When comparing allele distribution in patients and their matched controls, the allele <21CAs was found to be associated with the female gender (39.8 vs. 31.2%, P=0.041, OR=1.46, 95% CI 1.02-2.10), but not with male gender (34.4 vs. 30.9%, P%0.39). Within the melanoma group, there were no differences in the distribution of the MANBA alleles associated with patient gender or age before or after 55 years at diagnosis, nor was there any association between the MANBA genotype and pigment phenotype or tumor sites. The MANBA allele <21CAs was, however, associated with thin melanomas at diagnosis (Breslow thickness ≤1.5 mm and Clark levels I and II). In conclusion, these data suggest that MANBA polymorphisms might be an indicator of tumor growth and progression and, together with other markers, could be used to identify individuals at increased risk of melanoma.

  • 36.
    Carlsson, Jessica
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Davidsson, Sabina
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden / Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Helenius, Gisela
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Orebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Orebro, Sweden.
    Lubovac, Zelmina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Andren, Ove
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden .
    Olsson, Björn
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    A miRNA expression signature that separates between normal and malignant prostate tissues2011Ingår i: Cancer Cell International, ISSN 1475-2867, E-ISSN 1475-2867, Vol. 11, s. 14-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate genes involved in several key biological processes and thus are involved in various diseases, including cancer. In this study we aimed to identify a miRNA expression signature that could be used to separate between normal and malignant prostate tissues. Results: Nine miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed (p < 0.00001). With the exception of two samples, this expression signature could be used to separate between the normal and malignant tissues. A cross-validation procedure confirmed the generality of this expression signature. We also identified 16 miRNAs that possibly could be used as a complement to current methods for grading of prostate tumor tissues. Conclusions: We found an expression signature based on nine differentially expressed miRNAs that with high accuracy (85%) could classify the normal and malignant prostate tissues in patients from the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort. The results show that there are significant differences in miRNA expression between normal and malignant prostate tissue, indicating that these small RNA molecules might be important in the biogenesis of prostate cancer and potentially useful for clinical diagnosis of the disease.

  • 37.
    Carlsson, Jessica
    et al.
    Örebro University / Örebro University Hospital.
    Helenius, Gisela
    Örebro University / Örebro University Hospital.
    Karlsson, Mats G.
    Örebro University / Örebro University Hospital.
    Andrén, Ove
    Örebro University / Örebro University Hospital.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Olsson, Björn
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Differences in microRNA expression during tumor development in the transition and peripheral zones of the prostate2013Ingår i: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 13, artikel-id 362Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prostate is divided into three glandular zones, the peripheral zone (PZ), the transition zone (TZ), and the central zone. Most prostate tumors arise in the peripheral zone (70-75%) and in the transition zone (20-25%) while only 10% arise in the central zone. The aim of this study was to investigate if differences in miRNA expression could be a possible explanation for the difference in propensity of tumors in the zones of the prostate. Methods: Patients with prostate cancer were included in the study if they had a tumor with Gleason grade 3 in the PZ, the TZ, or both (n=16). Normal prostate tissue was collected from men undergoing cystoprostatectomy (n=20). The expression of 667 unique miRNAs was investigated using TaqMan low density arrays for miRNAs. Student's t-test was used in order to identify differentially expressed miRNAs, followed by hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) to study the separation of the tissues. The ADtree algorithm was used to identify markers for classification of tissues and a cross-validation procedure was used to test the generality of the identified miRNA-based classifiers. Results: The t-tests revealed that the major differences in miRNA expression are found between normal and malignant tissues. Hierarchical clustering and PCA based on differentially expressed miRNAs between normal and malignant tissues showed perfect separation between samples, while the corresponding analyses based on differentially expressed miRNAs between the two zones showed several misplaced samples. A classification and cross-validation procedure confirmed these results and several potential miRNA markers were identified. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the major differences in the transcription program are those arising during tumor development, rather than during normal tissue development. In addition, tumors arising in the TZ have more unique differentially expressed miRNAs compared to the PZ. The results also indicate that separate miRNA expression signatures for diagnosis might be needed for tumors arising in the different zones. MicroRNA signatures that are specific for PZ and TZ tumors could also lead to more accurate prognoses, since tumors arising in the PZ tend to be more aggressive than tumors arising in the TZ.

  • 38.
    Carlsson, Jessica
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Helenius, Gisela
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Karlsson, Mats
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Lubovac, Zelmina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Andrén, Ove
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Olsson, Björn
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Validation of suitable endogenous control genes for expression studies of miRNA in prostate cancer tissues2010Ingår i: Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, ISSN 2210-7762, E-ISSN 2210-7770, Vol. 202, nr 2, s. 71-75Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    When performing quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, there is a need for correction of technical variation between experiments. This correction is most commonly performed by using endogenous control genes, which are stably expressed across samples, as reference genes for normal expression in a specific tissue. In microRNA (miRNA) studies, two types of control genes are commonly used: small nuclear RNAs and small nucleolar RNAs. In this study, six different endogenous control genes for miRNA studies were investigated in prostate tissue material from the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort. The stability of the controls was investigated using two different software applications, NormFinder and BestKeeper. RNU24 was the most suitable endogenous control gene for miRNA studies in prostate tissue materials.

  • 39.
    Carlström, Karl E.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ewing, Ewoud
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granqvist, Mathias
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gyllenberg, Alexandra
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aeinehband, Shahin
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enoksson, Sara Lind
    Department of Clinical Immunology Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Checa, Antonio
    Division of Physiological Chemistry II, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Badam, Tejaswi
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Physics, Chemistry & Biology (IFM), Bioinformatics, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Huang, Jesse
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gomez-Cabrero, David
    Translational Bioinformatics Unit, Navarrabiomed, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra (CHN), Universidad Publica de Nevarra (UPNA), IdiSNA, Pamplona, Spain.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Al Nimer, Faiez
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wheelock, Craig E.
    Division of Physiological Chemistry II, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jagodic, Maja
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Therapeutic efficacy of dimethyl fumarate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis associates with ROS pathway in monocytes2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 1-13, artikel-id 3081Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a first-line-treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The redox master regulator Nrf2, essential for redox balance, is a target of DMF, but its precise therapeutic mechanisms of action remain elusive. Here we show impact of DMF on circulating monocytes and T cells in a prospective longitudinal RRMS patient cohort. DMF increases the level of oxidized isoprostanes in peripheral blood. Other observed changes, including methylome and transcriptome profiles, occur in monocytes prior to T cells. Importantly, monocyte counts and monocytic ROS increase following DMF and distinguish patients with beneficial treatment-response from non-responders. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the ROS-generating NOX3 gene is associated with beneficial DMF treatment-response. Our data implicate monocyte-derived oxidative processes in autoimmune diseases and their treatment, and identify NOX3 genetic variant, monocyte counts and redox state as parameters potentially useful to inform clinical decisions on DMF therapy of RRMS.

  • 40.
    Chaudhari, Aditi
    et al.
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krumlinde, Daniel
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Scientific Solutions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Annika
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Akyurek, Levent M
    Department of Medical Chemistry and Cell Biology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bandaru, Sashidhar
    Department of Medical Chemistry and Cell Biology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skalen, Kristina
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stahlman, Marcus
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Boren, Jan
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Yvonne
    Department of Surgery, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande. Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sopasakis, Victoria Rotter
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    p110 alpha Hot Spot Mutations E545K and H1047R Exert Metabolic Reprogramming Independently of p110 alpha Kinase Activity2015Ingår i: Molecular and Cellular Biology, ISSN 0270-7306, Vol. 35, nr 19, s. 3258-3273Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit p110α is the most frequently mutated kinase in human cancer, and the hot spot mutations E542K, E545K, and H1047R are the most common mutations in p110α. Very little is known about the metabolic consequences of the hot spot mutations of p110α in vivo. In this study, we used adenoviral gene transfer in mice to investigate the effects of the E545K and H1047R mutations on hepatic and whole-body glucose metabolism. We show that hepatic expression of these hot spot mutations results in rapid hepatic steatosis, paradoxically accompanied by increased glucose tolerance, and marked glycogen accumulation. In contrast, wild-type p110α expression does not lead to hepatic accumulation of lipids or glycogen despite similar degrees of upregulated glycolysis and expression of lipogenic genes. The reprogrammed metabolism of the E545K and H1047R p110α mutants was surprisingly not dependent on altered p110α lipid kinase activity.

  • 41.
    Chaudhari, Aditi
    et al.
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krumlinde, Daniel
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Annika
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Akyürek, Levent M.
    Department of Medical Chemistry and Cell biology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bandaru, Sashidhar
    Department of Medical Chemistry and Cell biology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skålén, Kristina
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ståhlman, Marcus
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Borén, Jan
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Yvonne
    Department of Surgery, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rotter Sopasakis, Victoria
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    p110α hot spot mutations E545K and H1047R exert metabolic reprogramming independently of p110α kinase activity2015Ingår i: Molecular and Cellular Biology, ISSN 0270-7306, E-ISSN 1098-5549, Vol. 35, nr 19, s. 3258-3273Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit p110α is the most frequently mutated kinase in human cancer, and the hot spot mutations E542K, E545K, and H1047R are the most common mutations in p110α. Very little is known about the metabolic consequences of the hot spot mutations of p110α in vivo. In this study, we used adenoviral gene transfer in mice to investigate the effects of the E545K and H1047R mutations on hepatic and whole-body glucose metabolism. We show that hepatic expression of these hot spot mutations results in rapid hepatic steatosis, paradoxically accompanied by increased glucose tolerance, and marked glycogen accumulation. In contrast, wild-type p110α expression does not lead to hepatic accumulation of lipids or glycogen despite similar degrees of upregulated glycolysis and expression of lipogenic genes. The reprogrammed metabolism of the E545K and H1047R p110α mutants was surprisingly not dependent on altered p110α lipid kinase activity.

  • 42.
    Chawade, Aakash
    et al.
    CropTailor AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindlöf, Angelica
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. CropTailor AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Björn
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Olsson, Olof
    CropTailor AB, Lund, Sweden / Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Global expression profiling of low temperature induced genes in the chilling tolerant japonica rice jumli marshi2013Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, nr 12, s. e81729-, artikel-id e81729Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Low temperature is a key factor that limits growth and productivity of many important agronomical crops worldwide. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is negatively affected already at temperatures below +10°C and is therefore denoted as chilling sensitive. However, chilling tolerant rice cultivars exist and can be commercially cultivated at altitudes up to 3,050 meters with temperatures reaching as low as +4°C. In this work, the global transcriptional response to cold stress (+4°C) was studied in the Nepalese highland variety Jumli Marshi (spp. japonica) and 4,636 genes were identified as significantly differentially expressed within 24 hours of cold stress. Comparison with previously published microarray data from one chilling tolerant and two sensitive rice cultivars identified 182 genes differentially expressed (DE) upon cold stress in all four rice cultivars and 511 genes DE only in the chilling tolerant rice. Promoter analysis of the 182 genes suggests a complex cross-talk between ABRE and CBF regulons. Promoter analysis of the 511 genes identified over-represented ABRE motifs but not DRE motifs, suggesting a role for ABA signaling in cold tolerance. Moreover, 2,101 genes were DE in Jumli Marshi alone. By chromosomal localization analysis, 473 of these cold responsive genes were located within 13 different QTLs previously identified as cold associated.

  • 43.
    Cheng, Xiaoxiao
    et al.
    Radcliffe Department of Medicine and Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, United Kingdom.
    Veverka, Vaclav
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN, United Kingdom, the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Flemingovo Namesti 2, 166 10 Prague 6, Czech Republic.
    Radhakrishnan, Anand
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030.
    Waters, Lorna C.
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN, United Kingdom.
    Muskett, Frederick W.
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN, United Kingdom.
    Morgan, Sara H.
    Radcliffe Department of Medicine and Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, United Kingdom.
    Huo, Jiandong
    Radcliffe Department of Medicine and Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, United Kingdom.
    Yu, Chao
    Radcliffe Department of Medicine and Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, United Kingdom.
    Evans, Edward J.
    Radcliffe Department of Medicine and Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, United Kingdom.
    Leslie, Alasdair J.
    Radcliffe Department of Medicine [Oxford].
    Griffiths, Meryn
    UCB Pharma, Slough SL1 4EN, United Kingdom.
    Stubberfield, Colin
    UCB Pharma, Slough SL1 4EN, United Kingdom.
    Griffin, Robert
    UCB Pharma, Slough SL1 4EN, United Kingdom.
    Henry, Alistair J.
    UCB Pharma, Slough SL1 4EN, United Kingdom.
    Jansson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Ladbury, John E.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Ikemizu, Shinji
    Division of Structural Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 5-1 Oe-honmachi, Kumamoto 862 0973, Japan.
    Carr, Mark D.
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN, United Kingdom.
    Davis, Simon J.
    Radcliffe Department of Medicine and Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, United Kingdom.
    Structure and Interactions of the Human Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor2013Ingår i: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 288, nr 17, s. 11771-11785Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PD-1, a receptor expressed by T cells, B cells, and monocytes, is a potent regulator of immune responses and a promising therapeutic target. The structure and interactions of human PD-1 are, however, incompletely characterized. We present the solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structure of the human PD-1 extracellular region and detailed analyses of its interactions with its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. PD-1 has typical immunoglobulin superfamily topology but differs at the edge of the GFCC' sheet, which is flexible and completely lacks a C '' strand. Changes in PD-1 backbone NMR signals induced by ligand binding suggest that, whereas binding is centered on the GFCC' sheet, PD-1 is engaged by its two ligands differently and in ways incompletely explained by crystal structures of mouse PD-1.ligand complexes. The affinities of these interactions and that of PD-L1 with the costimulatory protein B7-1, measured using surface plasmon resonance, are significantly weaker than expected. The 3-4-fold greater affinity of PD-L2 versus PD-L1 for human PD-1 is principally due to the 3-fold smaller dissociation rate for PD-L2 binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction is entropically driven, whereas PD-1/PD-L2 binding has a large enthalpic component. Mathematical simulations based on the biophysical data and quantitative expression data suggest an unexpectedly limited contribution of PD-L2 to PD-1 ligation during interactions of activated T cells with antigen-presenting cells. These findings provide a rigorous structural and biophysical framework for interpreting the important functions of PD-1 and reveal that potent inhibitory signaling can be initiated by weakly interacting receptors.

  • 44.
    Chowdhury, Manjushree
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Science, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Mostafa, M. G.
    Institute of Environmental Science, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Biswas, Tapan Kumar
    Department of Chemistry, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Saha, Ananda Kumar
    Department of Zoology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Characterization of the effluents from leather processing industries2015Ingår i: Environmental Processes, ISSN 2198-7491, Vol. 2, nr 1, s. 173-187Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 45.
    Curtsdotter, Alva
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden / Department of Environmental Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, Georgia, United States.
    Banks, H. Thomas
    Center for Research in Scientific Computation, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, United States.
    Banks, John E.
    Undergraduate Research Opportunities Center (UROC), California State University, Monterey Bay, Seaside, CA, United States.
    Jonsson, Mattias
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Laubmeier, Amanda N.
    Center for Research in Scientific Computation, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, United States.
    Traugott, Michael
    Mountain Agriculture Research Unit, Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Bommarco, Riccardo
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ecosystem function in predator-prey food webs: confronting dynamic models with empirical data2019Ingår i: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 88, nr 2, s. 196-210Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Most ecosystem functions and related services involve species interactions across trophic levels, for example, pollination and biological pest control. Despite this, our understanding of ecosystem function in multitrophic communities is poor, and research has been limited to either manipulation in small communities or statistical descriptions in larger ones. Recent advances in food web ecology may allow us to overcome the trade-off between mechanistic insight and ecological realism. Molecular tools now simplify the detection of feeding interactions, and trait-based approaches allow the application of dynamic food web models to real ecosystems. We performed the first test of an allometric food web model's ability to replicate temporally nonaggregated abundance data from the field and to provide mechanistic insight into the function of predation. We aimed to reproduce and explore the drivers of the population dynamics of the aphid herbivore Rhopalosiphum padi observed in ten Swedish barley fields. We used a dynamic food web model, taking observed interactions and abundances of predators and alternative prey as input data, allowing us to examine the role of predation in aphid population control. The inverse problem methods were used for simultaneous model fit optimization and model parameterization. The model captured >70% of the variation in aphid abundance in five of ten fields, supporting the model-embodied hypothesis that body size can be an important determinant of predation in the arthropod community. We further demonstrate how in-depth model analysis can disentangle the likely drivers of function, such as the community's abundance and trait composition. Analysing the variability in model performance revealed knowledge gaps, such as the source of episodic aphid mortality, and general method development needs that, if addressed, would further increase model success and enable stronger inference about ecosystem function. The results demonstrate that confronting dynamic food web models with abundance data from the field is a viable approach to evaluate ecological theory and to aid our understanding of function in real ecosystems. However, to realize the full potential of food web models, in ecosystem function research and beyond, trait-based parameterization must be refined and extended to include more traits than body size. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2018 British Ecological Society

  • 46.
    Dave, Vivek Priy
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Ngo, Tien Anh
    Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Tilevik, Diana
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Kanit, Krishna
    Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Nguyen, Trieu
    Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Wolff, Anders
    Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Bang, Dang Duong
    Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    MicroRNA amplification and detection technologies: opportunities and challenges for point of care diagnostics2018Ingår i: Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0023-6837, E-ISSN 1530-0307, Vol. 99, nr 4, s. 452-469Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume of point of care (POC) testing continues to grow steadily due to the increased availability of easy-to-use devices, thus making it possible to deliver less costly care closer to the patient site in a shorter time relative to the central laboratory services. A novel class of molecules called microRNAs have recently gained attention in healthcare management for their potential as biomarkers for human diseases. The increasing interest of miRNAs in clinical practice has led to an unmet need for assays that can rapidly and accurately measure miRNAs at the POC. However, the most widely used methods for analyzing miRNAs, including Northern blot-based platforms, in situ hybridization, reverse transcription qPCR, microarray, and next-generation sequencing, are still far from being used as ideal POC diagnostic tools, due to considerable time, expertize required for sample preparation, and in terms of miniaturizations making them suitable platforms for centralized labs. In this review, we highlight various existing and upcoming technologies for miRNA amplification and detection with a particular emphasis on the POC testing industries. The review summarizes different miRNA targets and signals amplification-based assays, from conventional methods to alternative technologies, such as isothermal amplification, paper-based, oligonucleotide-templated reaction, nanobead-based, electrochemical signaling-based, and microfluidic chip-based strategies. Based on critical analysis of these technologies, the possibilities and feasibilities for further development of POC testing for miRNA diagnostics are addressed and discussed.

  • 47.
    de Peppo, G.M.
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Svensson, S.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Lennerås, M.
    BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg.
    Synnergren, Jane
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Stenberg, J.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg.
    Strehl, R.
    Cellartis AB, Göteborg.
    Hyllner, J.
    Cellartis AB, Göteborg.
    Thomsen, P.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Karlsson, C.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Human Embryonic Mesodermal Progenitors Highly Resemble Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Display High Potential for Tissue Engineering Applications2010Ingår i: Tissue Engineering. Part A, ISSN 1937-3341, E-ISSN 1937-335X, Vol. 16, nr 7, s. 2161-2182Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Adult stem cells, such as human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), show limited proliferative capacity and, after long-term culture, lose their differentiation capacity and are therefore not an optimal cell source for tissue engineering. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) constitute an important new resource in this field, but one major drawback is the risk of tumor formation in the recipients. One alternative is to use progenitor cells derived from hESCs which are more lineage restricted but do not form teratomas. We have recently derived a cell line from hESCs denoted human embryonic stem cell-derived mesodermal progenitors (hESMPs) and here, using genome wide microarray analysis, report that the process of hES-MPs derivation results in a significantly altered expression of hESCs characteristic genes to an expression level highly similar to that of hMSCs. However, hES-MPs displayed a significantly higher proliferative capacity and longer telomeres. Interestingly, the hES-MPs also demonstrated a lower expression of HLA class II proteins before and after interferon-γ treatment, indicating that these cells may somewhat be immunoprivileged and potentially used for HLA-incompatible transplantation. The hES-MPs are thus an appealing alternative to hMSCs in tissue engineering applications and stem cell-based therapies for mesodermal tissues.

  • 48.
    Delsing, Louise
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Neurochemistry, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Dönnes, Pierre
    SciCross AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Sánchez, José
    Biostatistics, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Clausen, Maryam
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Voulgaris, Dmitrios
    Department of Micro and Nanosystems, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falk, Anna
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Herland, Anna
    Department of Micro and Nanosystems, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brolén, Gabriella
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Department of Neurochemistry, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden / iClinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom / UK Dementia Research Institute at UCL, London, United Kingdom.
    Hicks, Ryan
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Barrier properties and transcriptome expression in human iPSC-derived models of the blood-brain barrier2018Ingår i: Stem Cells, ISSN 1066-5099, E-ISSN 1549-4918, Vol. 36, nr 12, s. 1816-1827Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell-based models of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are important for increasing the knowledge of BBB formation, degradation and brain exposure of drug substances. Human models are preferred over animal models because of inter-species differences in BBB structure and function. However, access to human primary BBB tissue is limited and has shown degeneration of BBB functions in vitro. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be used to generate relevant cell types to model the BBB with human tissue. We generated a human iPSC-derived model of the BBB that includes endothelial cells in co-culture with pericytes, astrocytes and neurons. Evaluation of barrier properties showed that the endothelial cells in our co-culture model have high transendothelial electrical resistance, functional efflux and ability to discriminate between CNS permeable and non-permeable substances. Whole genome expression profiling revealed transcriptional changes that occur in co-culture, including upregulation of tight junction proteins such as claudins and neurotransmitter transporters. Pathway analysis implicated changes in the WNT, TNF and PI3K-Akt pathways upon co-culture. Our data suggests that co-culture of iPSC-derived endothelial cells promotes barrier formation on a functional and transcriptional level. The information about gene expression changes in co-culture can be used to further improve iPSC-derived BBB models through selective pathway manipulation.

  • 49.
    Delsing, Louise
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Discovery Biology, Discovery Sciences, R&D, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Kallur, Therese
    BioLamina, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK / UK Dementia Research Institute at UCL, London, UK.
    Hicks, Ryan
    Discovery Biology, Discovery Sciences, R&D, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Enhanced xeno-free differentiation of hiPSC-derived astroglia applied in a blood-brain barrier model2019Ingår i: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, ISSN 2045-8118, E-ISSN 2045-8118, Vol. 16, nr 1, artikel-id 27Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) hold great promise for use in cell therapy applications and for improved in vitro models of human disease. So far, most hiPSC differentiation protocols to astroglia use undefined, animal-containing culture matrices. Laminins, which play an essential role in the regulation of cell behavior, offer a source of defined, animal-free culture matrix. Methods In order to understand how laminins affect astroglia differentiation, recombinant human laminin-521 (LN521), was compared to a murine Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma derived laminin (L2020). Astroglia expression of protein and mRNA together with glutamate uptake and protein secretion function, were evaluated. Finally, these astroglia were evaluated in a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Results Astroglia of good quality were generated from hiPSC on both LN521 and L2020. However, astroglia differentiated on human LN521 showed higher expression of several astroglia specific mRNAs and proteins such as GFAP, S100B, Angiopoietin-1, and EAAT1, compared to astroglia differentiated on murine L2020. In addition, glutamate uptake and ability to induce expression of junction proteins in endothelial cells were affected by the culture matrix for differentiation. Conclusion Our results suggest that astroglia differentiated on LN521 display an improved phenotype and are suitable for coculture in a hiPSC-derived BBB model. This provides a starting point for a more defined and robust derivation of astroglia for use in BBB coculture models.

  • 50.
    Delsing, Louise
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Synnergren, Jane
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Hicks, Ryan
    IMED Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Human iPSC-derived endothelial cells can develop in to brain-like endothelial cells after coculture with primary human brain cells2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
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