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  • 1.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The Kleptomaniac Leadership and his Destructive Role on the Economic Dimension of Nation Building2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Mukhtar, Syeda-Masooda
    Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    Acquiring Cross-Cultural Competence: Insights from International Firms in Four Countries2016In: Entrepreneurship Development in a Globalized Era / [ed] Dana-Nicoleta Lascu, 2016, Vol. 13, 1-13 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms increasingly have to compete globally in order to survive. An understanding of the host country’s local culture arguably being one of the most important aspects of this survival. The greater the cultural difference, the higher the risk of miscommunication and of mismanagement. Given that cross-cultural management is acknowledged as an intrinsic part of firm establishment in foreign markets today, we set out to explore the linkages between the competence of international firms in managing cultural differences and the effectiveness of their business operations. How this ‘cross-cultural competence’ is acquired is of particular interest to this study. Swedish firms operating in Kenya, Lithuania, Poland and Russia are examined. The findings show that international firms tend not to formulate any preparatory measures to become ‘culturally competent’ prior to entering foreign markets. Learning takes place by doing. A Process Model of Acquiring Cross-Cultural Competence in Foreign Markets is constructed.

  • 3.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Mukhtar, Syeda-Masooda
    King Abdul Aziz University, Saudi Arabia.
    Learning from Failed Strategic Alliances: A European Case Study2015In: Regional and International Competiveness: Defining National and Governmental Drivers of Productivity, Efficiency, Growth and Profitability / [ed] E. Kaynak & T. D. Harcar, 2015, Vol. 24, 186-194 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Mukhtar, Syeda-Masooda
    King Abdul Aziz University, Saudi Arabia.
    Strategic Alliance Breakups: The Volvo-Renault Story2015In: Exploring the Possibilities for Sustainable Future Grows in Business and Technology Management / [ed] N. J. Delener, Leonora Fuxman, F. Victor Lu & Susana Rodrigues, Global Business and Technology Association , 2015, 1-11 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Mukhtar, Syeda-Masooda
    Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    The Process of Firm Establishment In International Markets: A European Telecommunications Operator in Latin America2016In: 17th International Academy of African Business and Development Conference Proceedings: Governance and business policies: Towards sustainable African business development / [ed] Anita Spring & Pantaleo Rwelamila, 2016, 376-390 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our understanding of the process of firm establishment of foregin firms within the developing and emerging countries remains limited, while the market-specific context-driven nature of the firm establishment process has been largely overlooked in the literature. We aim to address these omissions and explore the establishment process of a Spanish multinational telecommunication firm, Telefónica, in Brazil and Chile applying the "Four Stages Firm Establishment Process Model" by Abraha (1994). We identify strategic responses crafted by Telefónica to overcome competitive challenges during its establishment process. We revise Abraha's model in view of the findings and conclude with implications for managerial practices and future research.

  • 6.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Radón, Anita
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Sundström, Malin
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Reardon, James
    Monfort College of Business, Greeley Colorado, USA.
    The effect of cosmopolitanism, national identity and ethnocentrism on Swedish purchase behavior2015In: Journal of Management and Marketing Research, ISSN 1941-3408, Vol. 18, 152146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian market has changed significantly over the past half-decade with several online distributors, particularly of digital files such as music, originating locally. This ineffect has significantly further increased globalization of commerce in the Nordic countries. The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of more traditional models of consumer choice regarding local vs global products in this context. While the major metro areas of Scandinavia have always been largely global, this research reaches further into the central part where attitudes and globalization tends to be adopted at a slower pace

  • 7.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Radón, Anita
    Swedish Institute for Innovative Retailing, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Sundström, Malin
    Swedish Institute for Innovative Retailing, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Reardon, James
    Monfort College of Business, University of Northern Colorado, USA.
    The effect of cosmopolitanism, national identity and ethnocentrism on Swedish purchase behavior2015In: Proceedings of the AABRI conference, Orlando Florida, January 1-3, Academic and Business Research Institute , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Abraha Gebrekidan, Desalegn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The Destructive Impact of the Psychopathic and Narcissistic Leadership on the Diplomatic Dimension of Nation Building2016In: 17th International Academy of African Business and Development Conference Proceedings: May 2016, IAABD Annual Conference Proceedings, 2016, 51- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: This article examines the Diplomatic Dimension of Nation building in Eritrea in light of the diplomatic vision adopted in 1994 by the so called the Peoples Front for Democracy and Justice (PFDJ). Both secondary and primary data are used to write this article. The primary data is collected through telephone interviews, personal interviews, skype-interviews and focus-group discussions with some veteran liberation fighters, former government officials, diplomats and some Eritreans who were holding key positions in the government and who have experience and knowledge as to how the narcissists and psychopaths deal with the neighboring countries and regional as well as international cooperation and relationships. The main findings show that the leadership has committed a diplomatic, moral and ethical blunder scoring one of its main failures in the diplomatic dimension of nation building. This is due to the fact that it has applied a militarist and one man owned, designed, decided and mismanaged diplomatic relationships which is not at all co-operative, although it claims that it applies a healthy neighborly, regional and international cooperation and relationships as stipulated in the diplomatic vision. Moreover, the dysfunctional militarist and one man owned, designed, decided and miss managed relationships and diplomatic approach is not properly planned and it is poorly coordinated and terribly mismanaged. This reality has a serious negative consequence on the diplomatic, economic, social, cultural, organizational and political conditions of the country. The other finding of this study is that the reason why the failed, i.e. narcissistic and psychopathic leadership applies a militarist and one man owned diplomatic relationships model is because it clearly understands that to maintain and strengthen its political, economic, cultural, organizational and social power i.e. power of all aspects it has to have a full control of all the diplomatic, economic, financial and human resources in the country. The reason why the psychopaths spear headed by the self-appointed destructive dictator do not implement the diplomatic vision is because like all the other visions envisaged in the 1994 charter, the diplomatic vision was not designed to be implemented but to help the dictator to get enough time to create the conditions necessary to implement the hidden vision which the Eritrean people couldn’t yet design appropriate strategies to fight it adequately and to dismantle its power apparatus. The last reason for the failure of the diplomatic dimension of nation building is the lack of a competent and authentic leadership that possesses the qualities of an effective, legacy building and developmental leadership.

  • 9.
    Abraha Gebrekidan, Desalegn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The leadership hypocrisy of four million parties and its insurmountable consequences on the political dimension of nation building: An Illustration of the so called “Peoples Front for Democracy and Justice (PFDJ) Central Office in Eritrea”2014In: 15th annual IAABD international conference, International Academy of African Business and Development , 2014, 1-34 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The main results of this article are (i) the PFDJ and in particular Isayas has committed a political blunder  in the political dimension of nation building by refusing to implement the constitution, (ii) the PFDJ militarized political ideology is a poisonous tool applied to secure the political power of the dictator, (iii) the political vision was not developed to be implemented but to consolidate the raw political power’ of the ‘raw dictator’ in the raw and secretive underground party by liquidating all democratic elements, (iii) the dictator is incompetent to lead the task successfully, and (iv) the other cause for the failure is the lack of an authentic leader who possesses the qualities of a developmental and legacy-building leaders.

  • 10.
    Abraha Gebrekidan, Desalegn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Hyder, Akmal S.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    A Longitudinal Study of Strategic Alliances in Eastern and Central Europe: The Case of ACCEL Share Company (ASC) and two Local Firms in Lithuania2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Abraha Gebrekidan, Desalegn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Mukhtar, Syeda-Masooda
    King AbdulAziz University, Saudi Arabia.
    Managing Cultural Differences in International Business Operations: A Perspective from Europe2014In: Proceedings of 6th Annual American Business Research Conference 9 -10 June 2014, Sheraton LaGuardia East Hotel, New York, USA, World Business Institute Australia , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the advantages of globalization are numerous, (including economies of scale in research and development, production, marketing, access to large and many markets, access to new ideas, technologies, competencies, resources), globalization also brings with it new challenges. Cultural differences arguably being one of the most important of these challenges. Literature suggests that cultural differences and the firms’ ability to deal with them have a significant impact on firms’ operations as well as performance. Against this background, this study explores the relationship between cultural differences and the effectiveness of international business operations. The data is drawn from a sample of North European firms operating in diverse foreign markets. The findings show that for the European firms in our sample the learning, in the main, tended to take place 'by doing' over time. The paper concludes with managerial implications.

  • 12.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Karlsson, Jan Ch.
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Tankar om arbetslivet2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Aggestam, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Knowledge Leakage when SMEs Participate in Supply Chains: What Is It About and How Can It Occur?2016In: International Journal of Knowledge and Systems Science (IJKSS), ISSN 1947-8208, Vol. 7, no 3, 30-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advantages of sharing knowledge when participating in a Supply Chain (SC) are well established in the literature, but the challenge of knowledge leakage, and how to manage it, is still in its infancy. In order to increase the understanding of knowledge leakage, when SMEs participate in SCs, this study describes types of knowledge that may leak away, how they are valued, and how knowledge leakage can occur. The result includes two frameworks that also have shown to be potentially useful for examining the maturity of a specific SME with regard to knowledge leakages when participating in the SC.

  • 14.
    Aggestam, Lena
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Critical Success Factors in Capturing Knowledge for Retention in IT-Supported Repositories2014In: Information, ISSN 2078-2489, Vol. 5, no 4, 558-569 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate the suitability of IT-supported knowledge repositories for knowledge retention. Successful knowledge retention is dependent on whatis stored in a repository and, hence, possible to share. Accordingly, the ability to capture theright (relevant) knowledge is a key aspect. Therefore, to increase the quality in an IT-supported knowledge repository, the identification activity, which starts the capture process, must besuccessfully performed. While critical success factors (CSFs) for knowledge retention andknowledge management are frequently discussed in the literature, there is a knowledge gapconcerning CSFs for this specific knowledge capture activity. From a knowledge retention perspective, this paper proposes a model that characterizes CSFs for the identification activity and highlights the CSFs’ contribution to knowledge retention.

  • 15.
    Aisenberg Ferenhof, Helio
    et al.
    Department of Production Engineering and System, Complexo de Ensino Superior de Santa Catarina (CESUSC) and Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Hesamamiri, Roozbeh
    Iran University of Science & Technology (IUST), Tehran, Iran.
    The impact of social media on knowledge management2016In: IFKAD 2016 - 11th International Forum on Knowledge Asset Dynamics: Towards a New Architecture of Knowledge: Big Data, Culture and Creativity Proceedings / [ed] J. C. Spender, Giovanni Schiuma, Joerg Rainer Noennig, Institute of Knowledge Asset Management (IKAM) , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to review extant research on the impact of social media on knowledge management (KM) to establish the current body of knowledge and, on this basis, to suggest some promising avenues for future research.

    The study consists of a systematic literature review of eighteen refereed empirical articles on social media and knowledge management. In order to get access to the articles, we used different scientific databases such as Scopus and ProQuest. As keywords, we decided to use multiple keyword combinations. After having read the abstracts of the articles identified, we ended up with a final set of eighteen articles, which represented the basis for analysis. The systematic approach helped us to make sure that the majority of relevant papers would be covered. 

    To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no systematic literature review on social media and knowledge management has previously been published or presented.

    The topic seems to be a promising field for systematic and intensive research and offers a variety of future research avenues.

  • 16.
    Aisenberg Ferenhof, Helio
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Selig, Paulo Mauricio
    Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil.
    Knowledge waste in organizations: A review of previous studies2015In: Brazilian Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 1679-8171, Vol. 12, no 1, 160-178 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we are interested in the knowledge that is “wasted” in organizations, that is existing relevant knowledge that is overlooked in the process of knowledge conversion. Given the competitive pressure firms are facing in today´s business environment, a waste of knowledge is not only costly but also dangerous. This means that we consider knowledge from a knowledge at risk perspective. Having this in mind, the purpose of this paper is to review research on knowledge waste in organizations to establish our current body of knowledge regarding this topic. The study consists of a systematic review of 51 peer-reviewed articles addressing knowledge waste in organizations. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no systematic literature review on this topic has previously been published or presented. The topic seems to be a promising field for intensive research and offers a variety of future research avenues. In view of practitioners, the study´s finding may enable an increased awareness towards the areas where existing knowledge is at the mercy of “waste”. This can assist practitioners to better cope with risks related to this waste and, therefore, better exploit the (limited) knowledge base available.

  • 17.
    Aisenberg Ferenhof, Helio
    et al.
    Production Engineering Department, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Zaniboni Bialecki, Mariana
    Production Engineering Department, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.
    Selig, Paulo Mauricio
    Engineering & Knowledge Management Department, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.
    Intellectual capital dimensions: state of the art in 20142015In: Journal of Intellectual Capital, ISSN 1469-1930, E-ISSN 1758-7468, Vol. 16, no 1, 58-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to review extant literature to identify models intended to measure/classify intellectual capital (IC) to establish the current body of knowledge that has been built since the review by Marr et al. (2004).

    Design/methodology/approach – The study consists of a systematic review of peer-reviewed articles on IC classification. The review was conducted for the period 2004-2014 in order to reach the aim. To ensure that all major models are included, important works developed prior to 2004 were captured as well.

    Findings – The review resulted in 83 additional models indicating continued research activities with regard to the topic. These models were merged with prior IC models and mapped on a timeline. The timeline clarifies that 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 represent the years of greatest research activity (outcomes). Additionally, the analysis of the list of IC frameworks resulted in the development of an IC Meta model. It synthesizes research activities in the field and highlights the main IC dimensions and sub-dimensions.

    Research limitations/implications – This study may not have enabled a complete coverage of all existing peer-reviewed articles in the field of IC classification. Yet, it seems reasonable to assume that the review process covered a large proportion of studies available.

    Originality/value – By aggregating and consolidating the IC frameworks covered, the study does not only provide an IC Meta model, but also promising directions for future research.

  • 18.
    Alvehus, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    STYRNING OCH PROFESSIONELLT INFLYTANDE I OFFENTLIGA ORGANISATIONER2016Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Att leda genom medarbetarskap2016In: Organisation & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-9114, no 2, 44-47 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Genom att ge medarbetarna förtroende och uppmuntra ansvars- och initiativtagande är det möjligt att bryta den passivitet som detaljerade regler och standardisering ofta medför.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Sociala resurser avgörande för organisatorisk resiliens - även i teknikorienterade organisationer!2014In: Organisatorisk resiliens: Vad är det som gör företag och organisationer livskraftiga? / [ed] Stefan Tengblad & Margareta Oudhuis, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 1, 93-112 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The medical leadership challenge in healthcare is an identity challenge2015In: Leadership in Health Services, ISSN 1751-1879, E-ISSN 1751-1887, Vol. 28, no 2, 83-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this article is to describe and analyse the identity challenges that physicians with medical leadership positions face.

    Design/methodology/approach– Four qualitative case studies were performed to address the fact that identity is processual, relational and situational. Physicians with managerial roles were interviewed, as well as their peers, supervisors and subordinates. Furthermore, observations were made to understand how different identities are displayed in action.

    Findings– This study illustrates that medical leadership implies identity struggles when physicians have manager positions, because of the different characteristics of the social identities of managers and physicians. Major differences are related between physicians as autonomous individuals in a system and managers as subordinates to the organizational system. There are psychological mechanisms that evoke the physician identity more often than the managerial identity among physicians who are managers, which explains why physicians who are managers tend to remain foremost physicians.

    Research limitations/implications– The implications of the findings, that there are major identity challenges by being both a physician and manager, suggest that managerial physicians might not be the best prerequisite for medical leadership, but instead, cooperative relationships between physicians and non-physician managers might be a less difficult way to support medical leadership.

    Practical implications– Acknowledging and addressing identity challenges can be important both in creating structures in organizations and designing the training for managers in healthcare (both physicians and non-physicians) to support medical leadership.

    Originality/value– Medical leadership is most often related to organizational structure and/or leadership skills, but this paper discusses identity requirements and challenges related to medical leadership.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Distributed Leadership in Healthcare: Post-NPM in Action2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Followership and Distributed Leadership in Healthcare2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Institutional Work Through Interaction in Healthcare2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Relational Leadership: An Enabler of Institutional Work in Healthcare2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Relational Leadership and Institutional Work in Healthcare2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Wickelgren, Mikael
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Career in Swedish Retail2016Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A career in retailing is to a large extent a boundaryless career. A career in retail does not limit the individual to a single organisation, to a single role/position, or to a hierarchical rung on the organisational ladder. Both co-workers and managers move quite easily among organisations within the same retail area, between different retail areas, and in and out of the retail sector.

    • In the past, the description of retailing as a transitory employment sector has had a negative connotation. Yet this description can also have quite a positive connotation. For example, experience acquired in the retail sector can be very useful in other work sectors. Moreover, people working in retail are generally motivated by job security, a job that is possible to combine to leisure/family, and a job close to home. They are typically much less motivated by traditional career advancement opportunities, the exercise of power over others, and by the desire to make decisions.

    • People working in retail have a rather limited interest in becoming managers in part because their major work motivators are not the motivators one usually associates with management career paths.

    • Gender is a relatively weak distinguishing variable in terms of retail careers, but there are some statistically significant – yet small – differences in the work characteristics of men and women in retail. For example, women in retail prioritize work-life balance, the proximity of workplace to home, and outside interests more than men in retail. These priorities have a limiting effect on their opportunities to accept managerial positions and to follow traditional, upward career paths.

    • There are more women than men working in the retail sector today, but a larger percentage of men in management positions. However, this cannot be explained by differences between the motivations of men and women to become managers or in their attitudes towards their own managerial capabilities. The explanation lies in other, more indirect factors such as the expectations of today’s managers.

    • Women generally earn less than men in the retail sector. This inequality is especially evident when differences in work responsibilities exist (e.g., specialized areas, subbranches, management tasks).

    • There is some general scepticism among employees in the retail sector as far as the extent to which their employers are willing to commit to their well-being and development. This finding has important practical implications when employees sense a lack of employer commitment to them.

    • People outside retail sector generally have a more negative picture of the retail sector than the people within the sector. People in the retail sector are relatively satisfied and think their work is varied and interesting.

    • The number of women at the lower management levels (at the store-level) is increasing. Because of this trend, which is expected to continue, in the relatively near future there may be as many female managers as male managers at this level. However, at the upper management levels in retail, there are more than ten men for every woman and no indications of change.

    • Job security is the most important career anchor for retail employees in Sweden. This finding has very important practical implications because job security is typically not associated with employment in the retail sector. It is a factor that can be an important consideration for retailers.

  • 28.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Wickelgren, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Karriärvägar i detaljhandeln2016Report (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Liff, Roy
    Borås University and Gothenburg Research Institute.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The cooptation of managerialism: Professionals' responses on accountability pressures2014In: International Labour Process Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    An experience based view on leader development: leadership as an emergent and complex accomplishment2016In: Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, ISSN 1477-7282, E-ISSN 1758-6097, Vol. 30, no 6, 30-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The paper aims to identify and address matching problems in leader development and to propose how these problems can be dealt with.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Based on previous research, traditional leadership development (LD) is criticized and alternative approaches are suggested.

    Findings

    This research identifies two major matching problems in traditional LD – between participant and development effort and between development effort and realities of managerial work. A context-sensitive and emergent view of LD is suggested to address these matching problems.

    Practical implications

    The paper illustrates the need of leader development that is addressing the complex nature of managerial work in a more holistic way and to help participants to understand how such complexities can be dealt with.

    Originality/value

    An alternative view of leader development is identified. It matches managers’ diversities and the realities of managerial work better than traditional leader development does.

  • 31.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Medledarskap: Ledarskap som kollektiv initiativförmåga2015In: Ledarskapsboken / [ed] Sten Jönsson, Lars Strannegård, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, 248-272 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The absorptive capacity of family firms - how familiness affects potential and realized absorptive capacity2015In: Journal of Family Business Management, ISSN 2043-6238, E-ISSN 2043-6246, Vol. 5, no 1, 73-89 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Absorptive capacity is a key competitive advantage and is defined as the capacity to absorb knowledge from the environment. Although some studies have examined how various antecedents to absorptive capacity differ between family firms and non-family firms, no studies have set out to specifically analyze absorptive capacity in the context of family firms. This paper discusses the ability of family firms to absorb external knowledge by analyzing the relationship between “familiness” and “absorptive capacity”.

    Design/methodology/approach

    By reviewing and combining studies on absorptive capacity and knowledge-management practices of family firms, new insights into the absorptive capacity of family firms are developed.

    Findings

    It is argued that due to higher levels of social capital, familiness is positively related to the ability to transform and use external knowledge (i.e. realized absorptive capacity). However, firms with high levels of familiness are likely to be inferior in acquiring and assimilating external knowledge (i.e. potential absorptive capacity).

    Originality/value

    Although previous studies have analyzed various knowledge-management practices of family firms, no studies have set out to specifically explore how familiness affects various dimensions of absorptive capacity.

  • 33.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    What about the employees in entrepreneurial firms?: A multi-level analysis of the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation, role ambiguity, and social support2017In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has mainly addressed outcomes of EO at the level of the firm. However, few studies have examined how EO affects employees. Using a multi-level analysis of 343 employees nested in 25 SMEs, revealed that EO will increase the degree of role ambiguity among employees. Social support from management was not found to have any effect on the relationship between EO and role ambiguity. However, social support from co-workers weakens the EO-ambiguity relationship and can counteract the negative effects of EO to some degree. The study contributes to the EO literature by being one of very few that have considered possible negative consequences of EO, and it also highlights how to reduce role ambiguity in entrepreneurial SMEs.

  • 34.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Andersén, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Deconstructing resistance to organizational change – A social representation theory approach2014In: International Journal of Organizational Analysis, ISSN 1934-8835, E-ISSN 1758-8561, Vol. 22, no 3, 342-355 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Social representation theory (SRT) is a growing theory in social psychology research. SRT is about how individuals co-construct representations of various objects in different social settings. These social representations govern the attitudes and actions of individuals and groups. In spite of the growing interest in SRT in various fields, no studies have used SRT to understand resistance to organizational change. Thus, the purpose of this work is to illustrate how SRT can be used to understand the concept of resistance to change.

    Design/methodology/approach - Review of the relevant literature on resistance to change and SRT in order to develop a conceptual framework for understanding resistance from the standpoint of SRT.

    Findings - We develop a model that illustrates how three interrelated objects, i.e. the organizational process and the pre- and post-change situation, are co-constructed in social contexts. Also, we discuss how representations of these objects can co-exist (cognitive polyphasia). Our study illustrates the complexity of resistance to change by deconstructing the concept.

    Originality/value - Application of SRT in order to analyze resistance to organizational change is a novel approach that provides several new insights. For example, whereas most publications regard advocates of change as sense-givers in the change recipient’s sense-making process, we argue for a more constructionist approach. Thus, all actors involved in the change process will affect each other and together co-construct the social representations. These social representations govern attitudes to change.

  • 35.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A Dynamic Approach to Causal Ambiguity - How Organizational Learning Affects Causal Ambiguity2015In: Proceedings of ICICKM 2015 The 12th International Conference on Intellectual Capital Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning / [ed] Vincent Ribière & Lugkana Worasinchai, Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Rent appropriation management of strategic human capital in practice2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resource immobility and sustained performance: A systematic assessment of how immobility has been considered in empirical resource-based studies2016In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 18, no 4, 371-396 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core notion of the resource-based view (RBV) is that the possession of certain resources can result in superior performance and, in order for this performance to be sustained, these resources cannot be perfectly mobile. Whereas previous reviews have mainly focused on the relationship between resources and temporary performance, no studies have systematically analyzed the extent to which empirical RBV studies have specifically considered immobility of resources. By analyzing a sample of 218 empirical RBV studies, the authors found that 17% of the studies directly measured some dimension of immobility (by, for example, actually measuring the level of social complexity, unique history, tacitness or tradability). Fewer than 2% of the studies measured the outcome of resource immobility, i.e. sustained performance differences. Based on these results, this paper discusses the consequences of overlooking this key dimension of the RBV (i.e. immobility) and suggests that, and discusses how, future research should consider resource immobility to a greater extent.

  • 38.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Entrepreneurial orientation and employee well-being2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    An integrated approach to rent appropriation and rent generation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Svensson, Lotten
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Entrepreneurially oriented in what? A business model approach to entrepreneurship2015In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 22, no 3, 433-449 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and argue for the necessity of deconstructing the entrepreneurship concept by analyzing entrepreneurial orientation (EO) at various levels of the business model.

    Design/methodology/approach – Literature review supplemented with five illustrative cases.

    Findings – A business model approach to entrepreneurship enables identification of the component of the business model in which entrepreneurship was started. This has several implications for analysis of the EO-performance relationship and for the identification of antecedents to EO.

    Originality/value – The EO of firms has generally been analyzed at a generic level, i.e. the concept has been used to measure and analyze the overall entrepreneurship of firms. In this paper, the authors argue that EO can be present in various dimensions of a business and that firms can be entrepreneurial in certain areas and conservative in other areas.

  • 41.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Samuelsson, Joachim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resource organization and firm performance: How entrepreneurial orientation and management accounting influence the profitability of growing and non-growing SMEs2016In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 22, no 4, 466-484 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of this study is to examine how entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and the use of management accounting practices (MAPs) in decision making affects the profitability of SMEs, and also to analyze the extent to which EO and the use of MAPs affects profitability differently in growing and non-growing SMEs.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper employs an empirical investigation which is based on a sample of 153 Swedish manufacturing SMEs. The data is analyzed by two- and three way interaction regressions.

    Findings

    EO and MAPs have a positive effect on profitability in non-growing SMEs, but the combined effect of EO and MAPs has no additional effect. However, for growing SMEs, high usage of MAPs in decision making is a prerequisite for EO to influence profitability.

    Originality/value

    This study is the first to use the resource-based view to examine the relationship between two dimensions of resource organization and SME profitability. Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) is used as a proxy for how resources are organized in order to identify opportunities, and management accounting practices (MAPs) are used as a proxy for how efficiently resources are organized.

  • 42.
    Auruskeviciene, Vilte
    et al.
    Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania.
    Radon, Anita
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Reardon, James
    University of Northern Colorado, USA.
    Vida, Irena
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Consumer Decision Model of Intellectual Property Theft in Eurasia Markets2015In: 15th EBES conference, Jan 8-10, Lisbon, Portugal, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Go East! How family businesses choose markets and entry modes when internationalising2016In: International Journal of Globalisation and Small Business, ISSN 1479-3059, E-ISSN 1479-3067, Vol. 8, no 4, 333-354 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the choices of foreign markets, international market selection (IMS), and the respective entry modes, entry mode selection (EMS), for family firms internationalisation by using in-depth case studies of two family-owned newspaper companies. These decisions are studied from the Uppsala-stage model perspective. The purpose is to understand how and why family firms choose IMS and EMS when internationalising from a risk perspective. This study shows that IMS and EMS can at times be the consequence of one decision which may be the result of opportunistic behaviour. The decision reflects the risk preferences of owning families when selecting markets and entry modes. The explored family firms use contrasting approaches as they choose IMS and EMS according to different logics. Psychic distance leads to certain international market selection, but there is not a given preference for low distance. Instead, the entry mode selection reflects the dominant risk perception of the owning families. A preference for direct entry modes corresponds to the owning families risk perception and need for control. Accordingly, IMS and EMS are two steps, but the order of these is not given, i.e. after an entry mode is chosen this may be applied irrespective of the market to be entered. Business model and acquisition are highlighted as alternative entry modes, giving control to family firms. Thereby, this study expands those prior and increases the understanding of the peculiarities of family firm internationalisation.

  • 44.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Heteronormativity and the family firm: Will we ever see a queer family business?2017In: Gender and Family Entrepreneurship / [ed] Vanessa Ratten, Veland Ramadani, Leo-Paul Dana, Robert D. Hisrich, Joao Ferreira, London and New York: Routledge, 2017, 171-182 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Internationalization of regional newspaper companies: two examples2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Newspaper companies and other media companies are under pressure as their traditional business model is challenged. Some companies try to compensate by entering new markets, i.e. to internationalize. This strategy increases their presence in old and new media markets and segments. This paper problematizes how two family owned newspaper companies internationalize from two perspectives, i.e. an ownership perspective and an industry perspective. Empirically, the paper draws on two examples of family owned newspaper companies. Semi-structured interviews with owners, managers and editors have been conducted domestically and in the respective foreign market. Archival data has been used to complement the interviews. Both companies started as regional newspaper companies and have reached leading positions in their distribution area. Whereas one company entered the Eastern European market in the 1990s the other company focused on domestic expansion and small scale, international joint ventures in the later 2000s. From an ownership perspective it becomes visible that the family owners are initiating and supporting the internationalization process. In one company, an owner manager was in charge for the internationalization process which can be seen as a success factor. In the other company, the owners were not actively involved which is reflected in the relatively poorer results. From a newspaper industry perspective the study shows that synergies are possible by syndication of content across languages within the same industry as well as business models (printing).These perspectives contribute to the developing body of literature in the field of media management on internationalization and ownership.

  • 46.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Learning to professionalize: handling tensions in a family owned newspaper business2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at understanding the professionalization process of a Swedish family owned newspaper from a generational perspective. Professionalization is a much debated topic within the family business field. Family ownership is still common in the Nordic countries.  But the consequences and implications are not well understood and despite its presence the issue of family ownership is rarely discussed in the academic field. Media studies discuss professionalization but mostly focusing on the journalistic profession. Ownership and ownership transition have only recently been discussed.

     Empirically, the paper draws on an in depth case study of a family owned newspaper company. Semi-structured interviews with owners, managers, board members, and editors have been conducted. The interviews were complemented with secondary material, e.g. annual reports and biographies. Four generations are discussed with regards to professionalization processes.  The study shows that competence and learning are factors influencing the professionalization process across generations.  Competence is divided into cultural and formal competence. Learning is categorized as experiential learning which increases over generations. Formal competence and structures become important, increasing the risk for alienation between the owners and the business.  Professionalization of ownership structures and roles has consequences for family, ownership and business. The paper contributes to the limited research on family ownership in media management research.

  • 47.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A founder’s heritage: the development of psychological ownership2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesIs a founder “leaving” an organization by selling it, or are there aspects of the founder left even though, the founder does not have a formal occupation or ownership in the organization?Will there be a legacy of the founder and how will this affect the psychological ownership? What is the founder’s heritage from a psychological ownership perspective?The purpose is to understand the consequences of a business sale of the founder and from a psychological ownership perspective.

    Prior WorkDrawing on the work of psychological ownership and founder heritage, the work combines important literatures to shed light on an important empirical phenomenon, i.e. the exit of a founder/entrepreneur and its consequences for the organization.

    ApproachThis study follows a single case study approach and draws on rich empirical material from semi-structured interviews and extensive archival data.

    ResultsWe show how central activities are affected by a founder’s heritage over long time after the formal exit has taken place. We illustrate the development of a founder’s psychological ownership before and after he has formally sold the legal ownership.

    Implications and ValueThe paper aims at contributing to the entrepreneurial and founder exit-literature by adding a process perspective. Unlike it is sometimes assumed in the entrepreneurship literature is an exit not necessarily a clear-cut and once and for all decision. The paper contributes also psychological ownership literature by highlighting its continuity after the formal sale of the legal ownership and its consequences for the organization.

  • 48.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. CeFEO@JIBS.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Family business, resilience and regional culture: Examples from Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines two regions in the south west of Sweden. A number of factors which are of significant importance in creating resilient family businesses as well as regions are identified. The study is based on a literature investigation and on 60 interviews of leaders in business and communities. Thereby, the study contributes to the scarce literature on resilience in family businesses and the interdependence with regional culture. Resilience in this paper refers to a particular type of economic and structural crisis which has not been considered before. We highlight similarities and differences of two regions in Sweden which have distinct regional cultures. These cultures support the development of resiliency. However, owning families as facilitators for organizational resilience play the central role. Their closeness and involvement in the business allows them to act fast and take decisions quickly which makes them more resilient.

  • 49.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Remembering the Founder in Times of Ownership and Leadership Changes2016In: RENT Proceedings 2016, Antwerp, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Is a founder “leaving” an organization by selling it, or are there aspects of the founder left even though, the founder does not have a formal occupation or ownership in the organization?

    What are the motives of a founder to sell his organization? Will there be a legacy of the founder and how will this affect the organization’s identity? By questioning ‘who were we?’ or ‘who have we been?’ the relevance of organizational history becomes apparent. But how does this work in practice when a founder is not any longer part of the dominant coalition of the organization?

    The purpose is to understand the heritage of a founder, and the consequences for the organizational identity when the founder exits.

    Prior Work

    Drawing on the work of entrepreneurial exit and organizational identity, including imprinting, the work combines important literatures to shed light on an important empirical phenomenon, i.e. the exit of a founder/entrepreneur.

     

    Approach

    This study follows a single case study approach and draws on rich empirical material from semi-structured interviews and extensive archival data.

     

    Results

    We show how central activities are affected by a founder’s heritage over long time after the formal exit has taken place. We illustrate this by analyzing the consequences of changes in ownership and leadership after the founder’s exit. The founder becomes an artefact which allows to signal continuity and discontinuity depending on the different owners’ perspectives.

     

    Implications and Value

    The paper aims at contributing to the entrepreneurial and founder exit-literature by adding a process perspective. Unlike it is sometimes assumed in the entrepreneurship literature is an exit not necessarily a clear-cut and once and for all decision. The paper contributes also to the organizational identity literature by highlighting the central role a founder can have for an organization.

  • 50.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Going private: A socioemotional wealth perspective on why family controlled companies decide to leave the stock-exchange2017In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 8, no 2, 74-86 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our purpose is to understand the process of ‘going private’ decisions in family firms by applying a socioemotional wealth (SEW) perspective, specified in the following research questions: how do socioemotional wealth considerations influence owning families’ decisions to delist their publicly-listed companies? How do socioemotional wealth considerations change after the delisting of a firm? Based on case studies of two family firms, we elaborate upon the balancing of socioemotional and financial wealth considerations by the family owners, the assessment of which changes over time. Ultimately, we propose that the experiences from being listed can lead to the reevaluation of financial, as well as socioemotional, wealth considerations. By delisting, the companies reclaim independence and control, and the identity as a private family-owned firm becomes once again pronounced. We develop the SEW-perspective by viewing the decision to delist as a mixed gamble, in that owning families have to weigh personal and financial losses against SEW gains, thereby indicating how SEW-considerations change over time. We find that owning families are willing to sacrifice current SEW, accepting current financial losses for prospective increased SEW. Additionally, in this study we extend the argument that decisions to leave the stock market are tradeoffs between competing factors.

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