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  • 1.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Steen, Gunilla
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Waern, Magda
    Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Johansson, Boo
    Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Odén, Anders
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Sjöström, Björn
    University of Skövde, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Health Care Pedagogics, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Steen, Bertil
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Pain and its relation to cognitive function and depressive symptoms: A Swedish population study of 70-year-old men and women2003In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 903-912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of pain and its characteristics, and to examine the association of pain with cognitive function and depressive symptoms, in a representative sample of 70-year-old men and women. Data were collected within the gerontological and geriatric population studies in Göteborg, Sweden (H-70). A sample of 124 men and 117 women living in the community took part in the study. A questionnaire was applied which included four different aspects of pain experience: prevalence, frequency of episodes of pain, duration and number of locations. In close connection to this, depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. The prevalence of pain during the last 14 days was higher in women (79%; n = 91) than in men (53%; n = 65) (P<0.001). Women (68%; n = 78) also reported pain that had lasted for >6 months to a greater extent than men (38%; n = 46) (P<0.001). The frequency of episodes of pain was also higher among women, 64% (n = 74) reporting daily pain or pain several days during the last 14 days while 37% of the men (n = 45) did so (P<0.001). Women (33%, n = 38) also reported pain experience from ≥3 locations more often than men (11%; n = 13) (P<0.001). On the other hand, the association between depressive symptoms and pain experience was more evident in men than in women. Women were taking significantly more antidepressants compared to men (P<0.03). The results show that pain is common in 70-year-old people and especially in women. However, associations between depressive symptoms and the four aspects of pain experience were more pronounced among men. 

  • 2.
    Browall, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden / Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
    Nasic, Salmir
    Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gaston-Johansson, Fannie
    Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
    Validity and Reliability of the Swedish Version of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS): An Instrument for the Evaluation of Symptom Prevalence, Characteristics, and Distress2013In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 131-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Training Intervention for Health Care Staff in the Provision of Existential Support to Patients With Cancer: A Randomized, Controlled Study2013In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 785-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, existential issues become more compelling. Throughout the illness trajectory, patients with cancer are cared for in oncology wards, by home care teams or in hospices. Nurses working with these patients are sometimes aware of the patients' existential needs but do not feel confident when discussing these issues. Objectives: To determine the effects of a training intervention, where the focus is on existential issues and nurses' perceived confidence in communication and their attitude toward caring for dying patients. Methods: This was a randomized, controlled trial with a training intervention comprising theoretical training in existential issues combined with individual and group reflection. In total, 102 nurses in oncology and hospice wards and in palliative home care teams were randomized to a training or non-training group. Primary outcomes, confidence in communication, and attitude toward the care of dying patients were measured at baseline, immediately after the training, and five to six months later. Results: Confidence in communication improved significantly in the training group from baseline (before the training) to both the first and second follow-up, that is, immediately after the training and five months later. The attitude toward caring for the dying did not improve in the training group. Conclusion: This study shows that short-term training with reflection improves the confidence of health care staff when communicating, which is important for health care managers with limited resources. Further studies are needed to explore how patients experience the communication skills of health care staff after such training. © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee.

  • 4.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden / Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA / Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA / Institute of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden / Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA / Institute of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gaston-Johansson, Fannie
    Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
    Symptom Burden Clusters: A Challenge for Targeted Symptom Management. A Longitudinal Study Examining Symptom Burden Clusters in Breast Cancer2014In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 731-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Although there has been a growing interest in cancer symptom clusters, less is known about symptom burden clusters. Objectives: To explore clusters of burdensome symptoms over time, the impact on health status and quality of life, and coping capacity in patients with breast cancer. Methods: In this longitudinal study, a sample of 206 patients completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire, and the Sense of Coherence scale, at diagnosis of primary or recurrent breast cancer, and at one-, three-, and six-month follow-ups. Results: Three clusters of burdensome symptoms were identified: emotional symptom burden, gastrointestinal symptom burden, and unwellness symptom burden. Most burdensome were emotional symptoms, with worrying, feeling sad, and feeling nervous as the core or defining symptoms. Over time, additional symptoms escalated the emotional symptom burden. The gastrointestinal symptom burden, with "change in the way food tastes" as a core symptom, was more often associated with chemotherapy. Less stable over time, the unwellness symptom burden could be interpreted as short- and long-term side effects of hormonal therapy. Of these clusters, only the emotional symptom burden cluster significantly diminished health status and quality of life. Patients reporting lower coping capacity experienced higher levels of symptom burden. Conclusion: This study provides insights into symptom burden clusters over time. A challenging approach toward symptom management in clinical oncology is to target the burden of a symptom cluster and to recognize the need for individually designed interventions to ameliorate symptom burden in cancer patients. © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee.

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