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  • 1.
    Backhaus, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Berg, Stefan
    Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Trollfors, Birger
    Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Rune
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Persson, Elisabet
    Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Claesson, Bernt E. B.
    Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Larsson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ek, Elisabeth
    Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Lars
    Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Borås Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
    Rådberg, Gunilla
    Uddevalla Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Johansson, Siv
    Halmstad Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Ripa, Torvald
    Halmstad Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Andersson, Kerstin
    Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Antimicrobial susceptibility of invasive pneumococcal isolates from a region in south-west Sweden 1998-20012007In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 19-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Invasive disease caused by antibiotic resistant pneumococci is a worldwide problem. All invasive pneumococcal strains in an area of south-west Sweden with 1.7 million inhabitants were collected prospectively during 1998-2001. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by E-test and correlated to serotypes and clinical characteristics. Of 827 strains, 744 (90%) were susceptible (S) to all agents tested and 83 (10%) were indeterminate (I) or resistant (R) to at least 1 agent. 22 isolates (2.7%) were I to penicillin (MIC gt0.06 to ≤1.0 mg/l), but none were R (MIC gt1.0 mg/l). Numbers and proportions of decreased susceptibility against other agents tested were as follows: erythromycin R: 30 (3.6%), clindamycin R: 6 (0.7%), tetracycline R: 16 (1.9%), moxifloxacin R: 1 (0.1%), cotrimoxazole I: 17 (2%) and R: 31(4%). Non-susceptibility to at least 1 agent was not correlated with age, clinical manifestation, underlying diseases and outcome. The serotype distribution differed between non-susceptible and susceptible strains. The serotypes in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine covered 42% of all infections and 73% of those caused by non-susceptible strains. In conclusion, the impact of antibiotic resistance in invasive pneumococcal disease remains limited in south-west Sweden.

  • 2.
    Gustafsson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Gunnar
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde.
    Nilsson, Patric
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Enroth, Helena
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Skaraborg Hospital, Capio Diagnostic AB, Skövde.
    Beronius, Marie Kia
    Centre for General Medicine, Kungsbacka.
    Andersson, Rune
    6Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Arvidson, Staffan
    Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell Biology (MTC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Invasive Staphylococcus aureus strains are highly variable in PFGE patterns, agr group and exoprotein production2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 577-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we have investigated 37 invasive Staphylococcus aureus strains (collected between 1997 and 2005) from 33 human episodes of septicaemia causing either endocarditis or vertebral osteomyelitis. All S. aureus strains were typed using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and most strains belonged to any of 4 different PFGE clusters. There was no correlation between any of the PFGE clusters with site of infection. All strains showed highly different expression patterns of extracellular proteins, i.e. we found a vast variation in the number of proteins and amount of individual proteins expressed by the different strains. There was no correlation between any cluster of exoprotein patterns with endocarditis or with vertebral osteomyelitis. We did not find any correlation between agr group and endocarditis, as previously reported. On the other hand, a correlation between some of the PFGE clusters with a certain agr group was found. Known risk factors for S. aureus infections were observed in a majority of the patients.

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