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  • 1.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden / Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Holmberg, Stig B.
    Department of Surgery, SU/Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Bengt A.
    Microbiology and Immunology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Odén, Anders
    Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Mindfulness based stress reduction study design of a longitudinal randomized controlled complementary intervention in women with breast cancer2013In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 13, 248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The stress of a breast cancer diagnosis and its treatment can produce a variety of psychosocial sequelae including impaired immune responses. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a structured complementary program that incorporates meditation, yoga and mind-body exercises. Despite promising empirical evidence for the efficacy of MBSR, there is a need for randomized controlled trials (RCT). There is also a need for RCTs investigating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions on mood disorder and immune response in women with breast cancer. Therefore, the overall aim is to determine the efficacy of a Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) intervention on well-being and immune response in women with breast cancer.Methods and design: In this RCT, patients diagnosed with breast cancer, will consecutively be recruited to participate. Participants will be randomized into one of three groups: MBSR Intervention I (weekly group sessions + self-instructing program), MBSR Intervention II (self-instructing program), and Controls (non-MBSR). Data will be collected before start of intervention, and 3, 6, and 12 months and thereafter yearly up to 5 years. This study may contribute to evidence-based knowledge concerning the efficacy of MBSR to support patient empowerment to regain health in breast cancer disease.Discussion: The present study may contribute to evidence-based knowledge concerning the efficacy of mindfulness training to support patient empowerment to regain health in a breast cancer disease. If MBSR is effective for symptom relief and quality of life, the method will have significant clinical relevance that may generate standard of care for patients with breast cancer.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01591915. © 2013 Kenne Sarenmalm et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 2.
    Muller, Jasmin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Harlén, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees´ anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment – a randomised explorative pilot study2015In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 15, no 1, 302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Working people's reduced ability to recover has been proposed as a key factor behind the increase in stress-related health problems. One not yet evidence-based preventive method designed to help employees keep healthy and be less stressed is an armchair with built-in mechanical massage and mental training programmes, This study aimed to evaluate possible effects on employees' experience of levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability" when using mechanical massage and mental training programmes, both separately and in combination, during working hours.

    METHODS:

    Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to the mental training programmes only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). In order to discover how the employees felt about their own health they were asked to respond to statements from the "Swedish Scale of Personality" (SSP), immediately before the randomisation, after four weeks and after eight weeks (end-of-study).

    RESULTS:

    There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied ("Somatic Trait Anxiety", "Psychic Trait Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability") at any of the occasions. However, the massage group showed a significant decrease in the subscale "Somatic Trait Anxiety" (p=0.032), during the entire study period. Significant decreases in the same subscale were also observed in the pause group between start and week eight (p=0.040) as well as between week four and week eight (p=0.049) and also in the control group between the second and third data collection (p=0.014). The massage and mental training group showed a significant decrease in "Stress Susceptibility" between week four and week eight (p=0.022). The pause group showed a significant increase in the subscale "Detachment" (p=0.044).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied. However, when looking at each individual group separately, positive effects in their levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility" and "Detachment" could be seen. Although the results from this pilot study indicate some positive effects, mechanical chair massage and mental training programmes used in order to increase employee's ability to recover, needs to be evaluated further as tools to increase the employees ability to recover.

  • 3.
    Vixner, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Schytt, Erica
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden / Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a two month follow up of recollection of pain and birth experience2015In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 15, no 1, 180Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Vixner, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Schytt, Erica
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Waldenström, Ulla
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Hans
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial2014In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 14, 187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Acupuncture is commonly used to reduce pain during labour despite contradictory results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture with manual stimulation and acupuncture with combined manual and electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) compared with standard care in reducing labour pain. Our hypothesis was that both acupuncture stimulation techniques were more effective than standard care, and that electro-acupuncture was most effective.

    Methods: A longitudinal randomised controlled trial. The recruitment of participants took place at the admission to the labour ward between November 2008 and October 2011 at two Swedish hospitals . 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 minutes of manual acupuncture (MA), electro-acupuncture (EA), or standard care without acupuncture (SC). Primary outcome: labour pain, assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes: relaxation, use of obstetric pain relief during labour and post-partum assessments of labour pain. The sample size calculation was based on the primary outcome and a difference of 15 mm on VAS was regarded as clinically relevant, this gave 101 in each group, including a total of 303 women.

    Results: Mean estimated pain scores on VAS (SC: 69.0, MA: 66.4 and EA: 68.5), adjusted for: treatment, age, education, and time from baseline, with no interactions did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: mean difference 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.7-6.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 0.6 [95% CI] -3.6-4.8). Fewer number of women in the EA group used epidural analgesia (46%) than women in the MA group (61%) and SC group (70%) (EA vs SC: odds ratio [OR] 0.35; [95% CI] 0.19-0.67).

    Conclusions: Acupuncture does not reduce women’s experience of labour pain, neither with manual stimulation nor with combined manual and electrical stimulation. However, fewer women in the EA group used epidural analgesia thus indicating that the effect of acupuncture with electrical stimulation may be underestimated.

    These findings were obtained in a context with free access to other forms of pain relief.

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