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  • 1.
    Jansson, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Nilsson, Patric
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jirstrand, Mats
    Fraunhofer-Chalmers Research Centre for Industrial Mathematics, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hornquist, Elisabeth Hultgren
    Univ Örebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Dept Biomed, Örebro, Sweden.
    Toward Quantifying the Thymic Dysfunctional State in Mouse Models of Inflammatory Bowel Disease2013In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 881-888Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by a number of immunological alterations, not the least in the T-cell compartment. Numerous animal models of colitis have revealed aberrant thymocyte dynamics associated with skewed thymocyte development. The recent advancements in quantitative methods have proposed critical kinetic alterations in the thymocyte development during the progression of colitis. This review focuses on the aberrant thymocyte dynamics in G alpha i2-deficient mice as this mouse model provides most quantitative data of the thymocyte development associated with colitis. Herein, we discuss several dynamic changes during the progression of colitis and propose a hypothesis for the underlying causes for the skewed proportions of the thymocyte populations seen in the G alpha i2-deficient mice and in other mouse models of colitis. (Inflamm Bowel Dis 2013; 19: 881-888)

  • 2.
    Jonefjäll, Börje
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine, Kungälv Hospital, Kungälv, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina, USA.
    Strid, Hans
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine, Södra Älvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
    IBS-like Symptoms in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis in Deep Remission Are Associated with Increased Levels of Serum Cytokines and Poor Psychological Well-being2016In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 2630-2640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms (GI) compatible with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) in remission. The causes of these symptoms remain to be clarified. Our aim was to investigate prevalence and factors associated with IBS-like symptoms in patients with UC in deep remission.

    METHODS: We included 298 patients with UC and used Mayo score, sigmoidoscopy, and fecal calprotectin to define deep remission versus active disease. Presence of IBS-like symptoms according to the Rome III criteria, severity of GI, extraintestinal and psychological symptoms, stress levels, and quality of life were measured with validated questionnaires. Serum cytokines and high-sensitive C-reactive peptide were determined.

    RESULTS: The criteria for deep remission was fulfilled by 132 patients (44%) and 24 of these fulfilled the Rome III criteria for IBS (18%). Patients with UC in deep remission with IBS-like symptoms had comparable levels of GI symptoms, non-GI somatic symptoms, and quality of life as patients with active UC. The patients with UC in deep remission with IBS-like symptoms had similar levels of fecal calprotectin as patients in deep remission without IBS-like symptoms (18 versus 31 μg/g, P = 0.11), but higher levels of serum cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-13, IL-10 and IL-8, P < 0.05) and higher levels of anxiety (P < 0.001), depression (P = 0.02) and perceived stress (P = 0.03).

    CONCLUSIONS: IBS-like symptoms in patients with UC in deep remission are common, but not as prevalent as previously reported. Poor psychological well-being and increased serum cytokine levels, but not colonic low-grade inflammation, were associated with IBS-like symptoms.

  • 3.
    Magnusson, Maria K.
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strid, Hans
    Department of Internal Medicine, Södra Älvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Stefan
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Swede.
    The Mucosal Antibacterial Response Profile and Fecal Microbiota Composition Are Linked to the Disease Course in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis2017In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 956-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The clinical disease course of ulcerative colitis (UC) varies substantially between individuals and can currently not be reliably predicted. The gut microbiota and the host's immune defense are key players for gut homeostasis and may be linked to disease outcome. The aim of this study was to determine fecal microbiota composition and mucosal antibacterial response profile in untreated patients with newly diagnosed UC and the impact of these factors on disease course. Methods: Stool samples and intestinal biopsies were obtained from therapy-naive newly diagnosed patients with UC. Patients were defined to have mild or moderate/severe disease course assessed by disease activity during the 3 years follow-up. Fecal microbiota was analyzed by the GA-map Dysbiosis test (n = 18), and gene expression in intestinal biopsies was analyzed by RT2 Profiler polymerase chain reaction array (n = 13) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (n = 44). Results: At the time of diagnosis of UC, the fecal microbiota composition discriminated between patients with mild versus moderate/severe disease course. Also, the mucosal antibacterial gene expression response profile differed between patients with mild versus moderate/severe disease course with bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) being most important for the discrimination. Mucosal bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein gene expression at diagnosis was higher in patients with mild versus moderate/severe disease course when confirmed in a larger patient cohort (P = 0.0004, n = 44) and was a good predictor for the number of flares during the 3 years follow-up (R-2 = 0.395, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with newly diagnosed UC, fecal microbiota composition and mucosal antibacterial response profile, especially bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, are linked to disease course.

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