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  • 1.
    Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekman, Inger
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sweden.
    Friberg, Febe
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health, University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Daka, Bledar
    Insitute of Medicine, Department of Primary Health Care, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Ulf
    Insitute of Medicine, Department of Primary Health Care, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Charlotte A.
    Insitute of Medicine, Department of Primary Health Care, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden / University of Lund, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Social Medicine and Global Health, Malmö, Sweden.
    The association between self-rated health and impaired glucose tolerance in Swedish adults: A cross-sectional study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate gender differences in the association between self-rated health (SRH) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in subjects unaware of their glucose tolerance. Design. A cross-sectional population-based study. Setting. The two municipalities of Vara and Skovde in south-western Sweden. Subjects. A total of 2502 participants (1301 women and 1201 men), aged 30-75, were randomly selected from the population. Main outcome measures. IGT was regarded as the outcome measure and SRH as the main risk factor. Results. The prevalence of IGT was significantly higher in women (11.9%) than in men (10.1%), (p = 0.029), as was the prevalence of low SRH (women: 35.4%; men: 22.1%, p = 0.006). Both men and women with low SRH had a poorer risk factor profile than those with high SRH, and a statistically significant crude association between SRH and IGT was found in both men (OR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.8-4.4) and women (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.2, p = 0.033). However, after controlling for several lifestyle factors and biomedical variables, the association was attenuated and remained statistically significant solely in men (OR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.2-4.3). Conclusion. The gender-specific associations found between SRH and IGT suggest that SRH may be a better indicator of IGT in men than in women. Future studies should evaluate the utility of SRH in comparison with objective health measures as a potential aid to health practitioners when deciding whether to screen for IGT and T2DM.

  • 2.
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson-Hange, Dominique
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Kate
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Calle
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blomstrand, Ann
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bondyr-Carlsson, Dorota
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rödström, Kerstin
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Agneta
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sundh, Valter
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Weman, Lilian
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zylberstein, Dimitri
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Secular trends in cardiovascular risk factors with a 36-year perspective: Observations from 38- and 50-year-olds in the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To study secular trends in cardiovascular risk factors in four different cohorts of women examined in 1968-1969, 1980-1981, 1992-1993 and 2004-2005. Design. Comparison of four representative cohorts of 38- and 50-year-old women over a period of 36 years. Setting. Gothenburg, Sweden with similar to 450 000 inhabitants. Subjects. Four representative samples of 38- and 50-year-old women were invited to free health examinations (participation rate 59-90%, n =1901). Main outcome measures. Body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), leisure time exercise, use of antihypertensive medication, smoking, levels of haemoglobin, b-glucose, s-cholesterol, s-triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. Results. There was no significant difference in mean BMI from 1968-1969 versus 2004-2005. Mean leisure time exercise was significantly higher in later born cohorts; in 1968, around 15% were physically active compared with 40% in 2004. SBP and DBP, mean s-cholesterol and s-triglyceride levels were significantly lower in both 38- and 50-year-old cohorts in 2004-2005 versus 1968-1969. HDL-cholesterol (not measured until 1992-1993), showed a significantly higher mean level in 2004-2005. Reduction of risk factors was apparent in women with a high as well as low level of physical activity. Smoking declined most in women with high levels of physical activity. Conclusions. Several cardiovascular risk factors related to lifestyle have improved in middle-aged women from the 1960s until today. Most of the positive trends are observed in women with both low and high physical activity.

  • 3.
    Vuorio, Tina
    et al.
    Department of Family Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kautiainen, Hannu
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland / Unit of Primary Health Care, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
    Korhonen, Päivi
    Department of Family Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Health Center of Harjavalta, Central Satakunta Health Federation of Municipalities, Harjavalta, Finland.
    Determinants of sickness absence rate among Finnish municipal employees2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In addition to acute health problems, various aspects of health behavior, work-related and sociodemographic factors have been shown to influence the rate of sickness absence. The aim of this study was to concomitantly examine factors known to have an association with absenteeism. We hypothesized the prevalence of chronic diseases being the most important factor associated with sickness absence. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Occupational health care in the region of Pori, Finland. Subjects: 671 municipal employees (89% females) with a mean age of 49 (SD 10) years. Information about the study subjects was gathered from medical records, by physical examination and questionnaires containing information about physical and mental health, health behavior, work-related and sociodemographic factors. The number of sickness absence days was obtained from the records of the city of Pori. Main outcome measures: The relationship of absenteeism rate with sociodemographic, health- and work-related risk factors. Results: In the multivariate analysis, the mean number of chronic diseases (IRR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.36), work ability (IRR 0.83, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.91), and length of years in education (IRR 0.90, 95% CI 0.85 to 0.95) remained as independent factors associated with absenteeism. Conclusion: According to our results, chronic diseases, self-perceived work ability and length of years in education are the most important determinants of the rate of sickness absence. This implies that among working-aged people the treatment of chronic medical conditions is also worth prioritizing, not only to prevent complications, but also to avoid sickness absences. KEY POINTS Various sociodemographic, health- and work- related risk factors have been shown to influence sickness absence. The study aimed to find the most important determinants of absenteeism among several known risk factors in Finnish municipal employees. Chronic diseases, self-perceived work ability and education years remained as the most important determinants of sickness absence rates. Treatment of chronic medical conditions should be prioritized in order to reduce sickness absence rate. © 2019, © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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