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  • 1.
    de Groot, Gudrun Cathrine Lindgren
    et al.
    Telemark Hospital, Norway / Buskerud University College, Norway.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Buskerud University College, Norway / Lovisenberg Deaconale University College, Norway.
    Older adults' motivating factors and barriers to exercise to prevent falls2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe motivating factors and barriers for older adults to adhere to group exercise in the local community aiming to prevent falls, and thereby gain knowledge about how health professionals can stimulate adherence. The motivation equation was used as a theoretical framework. Data were collected from individual semi-structured interviews (n = 10). The interviews were taped, transcribed, and thereafter analysed by using a descriptive content analysis consisting of four steps. The results showed that motivating factors to adhere to recommended exercise were perceived prospects of staying independent, maintaining current health status, and improving physical balance and the ability to walk. Barriers were reduced health status, lack of motivation, unpleasant experience during previous exercise group sessions, and environmental factors. All participants wanted information from health professionals on the benefit of exercise. Many considered individual variations in functional skills within each group as a disadvantage. The knowledge gained from this study suggests a greater involvement from all health professionals in motivating older adults to attend exercise groups. The results also suggest that physical therapists should be more aware of the importance of comparative levels of physical function when including participants in exercise groups.

  • 2.
    Furåker, Carina
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The consultative work of occupational therapists working in municipal healthcare2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work of occupational therapists (OTs) in municipal healthcare has become more consultative in recent years. The aim of this study is to explore the content of the OTs’ consultative role in everyday activities in municipal healthcare. The study is based on data consisting of diary notes with additional reflections made by 23 OTs during three days. The data were subjected to content analysis. OTs are contacted via referrals (telephone calls or personal communication) to arrange consultations with patients, relatives, assistant staff, and colleagues. The OTs' consultative work consists of discussion, negotiation, information, or instruction, in relation to the advice and recommendations given. They also provide supervision and support to patients, relatives, and assistant staff. The advice and recommendations are evaluated. Thus, OTs' counselling consists of more than assessments and advice, as it also includes information, instruction, supervision, support, and evaluation. Further investigations are necessary in order to understand the competence that is needed and used in the consultative role of OTs in municipal healthcare. An implication for practice is that the healthcare managers need to support the OTs' possibility to provide supervision and support, especially in relation to assistant staff as they are responsible for everyday rehabilitation.

  • 3.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Department of Caring Sciences, Örebro University, SE-701 82 Örebro, Sweden.
    Berndtsson, Inger
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Appelros, Peter
    Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden / Neurotec Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Department of Caring Sciences, Örebro University, SE-701 82 Örebro, Sweden.
    Lifeworld perspectives on assistive devices: Lived experiences of spouses of persons with stroke2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore how spouses of persons with a disability following stroke describe their lived experiences regarding assistive devices in everyday life. A phenomenological lifeworld approach was used and conversational interviews were conducted with 12 spouses. Their lived experiences of assistive devices were explored in relation to four lifeworld existentials intertwined in everyday life. The results showed that lived body concerns aspects of feelings, habits, and incorporation of the devices with one's own body. The devices are, from the spouses' perspective, a prerequisite for their partner with stroke living at home. Successively the devices are incorporated into the couples' homes, and they provide a new view of the environment, aspects related to lived space. The devices bring about a changed relation to lived time, related to past, present, and future. Further, lived human relation concerns changed relationships to husbands/wives with stroke, including a great responsibility due to the devices and their usage. The results also included stigmatizing aspects and a twofold relationship to health professionals regarding participation in decisions about prescribing assistive devices. Understanding the unique meaning of assistive devices from the spouses' perspective is vital for occupational therapists prescribing such devices

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