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  • 1.
    Arvidsson, Louise
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hunsberger, Monica
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lanfer, Anne
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS GmbH, Bremen, Germany.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mehlig, Kirsten
    Marild, Staffan
    Univ Gothenburg, Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Dept Paediat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    BMI, eating habits and sleep in relation to salivary counts of mutans streptococci in children - the IDEFICS Sweden study2016In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 1088-1092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate the association between salivary counts of mutans streptococci (MS) and children's weight status, while considering associated covariates. MS ferments carbohydrates from the diet and contributes to caries by lowering the pH in dental plaque. In adults, high counts of MS in saliva have been associated with overweight, but this has not been shown in children. Design: Cross-sectional study investigating salivary counts of MS, BMI Z-score, waist circumference, meal frequency, sugar propensity and sleep duration, in children. Setting: West Sweden. Subjects: Children (n 271) aged 4-11 years. Results: Medium-high counts of MS were positively associated with higher BMI Z-score (OR=1.6; 95 % CI 1.1, 2.3). Positive associations were also found between medium-high counts of MS and more frequent meals per day (OR=1.5; 95 % CI 1.1, 2.2), greater percentage of sugar-rich foods consumed (OR=1.1; 95 % CI 1.0, 1.3) and female sex (OR=2.4; 95 % CI 1.1, 5.4). A negative association was found between medium-high counts of MS and longer sleep duration (OR=0.5; 95 % CI 0.3, 1.0). Conclusions: BMI Z-score was associated with counts of MS. Promoting adequate sleep duration and limiting the intake frequency of sugar-rich foods and beverages could provide multiple benefits in public health interventions aimed at reducing dental caries and childhood overweight.

  • 2.
    Bel-Serrat, Silvia
    et al.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Mouratidou, Theodora
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fondaz IRCSS Ist Nazl Tumori, Nutrit Epidemiol Unit, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Milan, Italy.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Boernhorst, Claudia
    Univ Bremen, Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Fernandez-Alvira, Juan Miguel
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Univ Bremen, Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Fac Med, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Ctr Hlth & Behav Sci, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Fondaz IRCSS Ist Nazl Tumori, Nutrit Epidemiol Unit, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Milan, Italy.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Relative validity of the Children's Eating Habits Questionnaire- food frequency section among young European children: the IDEFICS Study2014In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 266-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare, specifically by age group, proxy-reported food group estimates obtained from the food frequency section of the Children's Eating Habits questionnaire (CEHQ-FFQ) against the estimates of two non-consecutive 24h dietary recalls (24-HDR). Design: Estimates of food group intakes assessed via the forty-three-food-group CEHQ-FFQ were compared with those obtained by a computerized 24-HDR. Agreement on frequencies of intakes (equal to the number of portions per recall period) between the two instruments was examined using crude and de-attenuated Pearson's correlation coefficients, cross-classification analyses, weighted kappa statistics (kappa(w)) and Bland-Altman analysis. Setting: Kindergartens/schools from eight European countries participating in the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS) Study cross-sectional survey (2007-2008). Subjects: Children aged 2-9 years (n 2508, 50.4% boys). Results: The CEHQ-FFQ provided higher intake estimates for most of the food groups than the 24-HDR. De-attenuated Pearson correlation coefficients ranged from 0.01 (sweetened fruit) to 0.48 (sweetened milk) in children aged 2-<6 years (mean = 0.25) and from 0.01 (milled cereal) to 0.44 (water) in children aged 6-9 years (mean = 0.23). An average of 32 % and 31 % of food group intakes were assigned to the same quartile in younger and older children, respectively, and classification into extreme opposite quartiles was <= 12 % for all food groups in both age groups. Mean kappa(w) was 0.20 for 2-<6-year-olds and 0.17 for 6-9-year-olds. Conclusions: The strength of association estimates assessed by the CEHQ-FFQ and the 24-HDR varied by food group and by age group. Observed level of agreement and CEHQ-FFQ ability to rank children according to intakes of food groups were considered to be low.

  • 3.
    Börnhorst, Claudia
    et al.
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.;IARC, Dietary Exposure Assessment Grp DEX, Lyon, France.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Vanaelst, Barbara
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.;Res Fdn Flanders FWO, Brussels, Belgium.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Fac Med, Pecs, Hungary.
    Bel-Serrat, Silvia
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Mouratidou, Theodora
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCSS, Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Nutr Epidemiol Unit, Milan, Italy.
    Eha, Marge
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Surveillance & Evaluat, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kourides, Yiannis A.
    Res & Educ Fdn Child Hlth, Paphos, Cyprus.
    Siani, Alfonso
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pigeot, Iris
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Diet-obesity associations in children: approaches to counteract attenuation caused by misreporting2013In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 256-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Measurement errors in dietary data lead to attenuated estimates of associations between dietary exposures and health outcomes. The present study aimed to compare and evaluate different approaches of handling implausible reports by exemplary analysis of the association between dietary intakes (total energy, soft drinks, fruits/vegetables) and overweight/obesity in children. Design: Cross-sectional multicentre study. Setting: Kindergartens/schools from eight European countries participating in the IDEFICS Study. Subjects: Children (n 5357) aged 2-9 years who provided one 24 h dietary recall and complete covariate information. Results: The 24 h recalls were classified into three reporting groups according to adapted Goldberg cut-offs: under-report, plausible report or over-report. In the basic logistic multilevel model (adjusted for age and sex, including study centre as random effect), the dietary exposures showed no significant association with overweight/obesity (energy intake: OR=0.996 (95% CI 0.983, 1.010); soft drinks: OR=0.999 (95% CI 0.986, 1.013)) and revealed even a positive association for fruits/vegetables (OR=1.009 (95% CI 1.001, 1.018)). When adding the reporting group (dummy variables) and a propensity score for misreporting as adjustment terms, associations became significant for energy intake as well as soft drinks (energy: OR=1.074 (95% CI 1.053, 1.096); soft drinks: OR=1.015 (95% CI 1.000, 1.031)) and the association between fruits/vegetables and overweight/obesity pointed to the reverse direction compared with the basic model (OR=0.993 (95% CI 0.984, 1.002)). Conclusions: Associations between dietary exposures and health outcomes are strongly affected or even masked by measurement errors. In the present analysis consideration of the reporting group and inclusion of a propensity score for misreporting turned out to be useful tools to counteract attenuation of effect estimates.

  • 4.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    et al.
    Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Andersson, C. S.
    Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden / Department of Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Rothenberg, E.
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden / Department for Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sundh, V.
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Steen, B.
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lissner, L.
    Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden / Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Secular trends in diet among elderly Swedes – cohort comparisons over three decades2004In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 637-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare dietary practices among different birth cohorts of 70-year-old Swedes, who were examined between 1971 and 2000.

    SETTING: Göteborg, Sweden.

    DESIGN: Four population-based samples of 1360 70-year-olds, born in 1901, 1911, 1922 and 1930, have undergone health examinations and dietary assessments over a period of almost three decades. One-hour diet history (DH) interviews were conducted in 1971, 1981, 1992 and 2000 with a total of 758 women and 602 women. The formats and contents of the dietary examinations were similar over the years. Statistical analysis of linear trends was conducted, using year of examination as the independent variable, to detect secular trends in food and nutrient intakes across cohorts.

    RESULTS: At the 2000 examination, the majority of 70-year-olds consumed nutritionally adequate diets. Later-born cohorts consumed more yoghurt, breakfast cereals, fruit, vegetables, chicken, rice and pasta than earlier-born cohorts. Consumption of low-fat spread and milk also increased, along with that of wine, light beer and candy. In contrast, potatoes, cakes and sugar were consumed less in 2000 than in 1971. The ratio of reported energy intake to estimated basal metabolic rate did not show any systematic trend over time in women, but showed a significant upward trend in men.

    CONCLUSIONS: The diet history method has captured changes in food selections in the elderly without changing in general format over three decades. Dietary quality has improved in a number of ways, and these findings in the elderly are consistent with national food consumption trends in the general population.

  • 5.
    Fernández-Alvira, Juan Miguel
    et al.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI,C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, Zaragoza, Spain / Fundación Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
    Bammann, Karin
    Institute for Public Health and Nursing Sciences (IPP),University of Bremen,Bremen,Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Public Health Epidemiology Unit (EPI), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Kourides, Yannis A.
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Institute for Medical Information Processing, Biometrics and Epidemiology and German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Department of Public Health,Ghent University,Ghent,Belgium.
    Pala, Valeria
    Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Epidemiology Unit,Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Tomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI,C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Aragón, Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Spain.
    Börnhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Prospective associations between dietary patterns and body composition changes in European children: the IDEFICS study2017In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 20, no 18, p. 3257-3265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe dietary patterns by applying cluster analysis and to describe the cluster memberships of European children over time and their association with body composition changes.

    DESIGN: The analyses included k-means clustering based on the similarities between the relative frequencies of consumption of forty-three food items and regression models were fitted to assess the association between dietary patterns and body composition changes.

    SETTING: Primary schools and pre-schools of selected regions in Italy, Estonia, Cyprus, Belgium, Sweden, Hungary, Germany and Spain.

    SUBJECTS: Participants (n 8341) in the baseline (2-9 years old) and follow-up (4-11 years old) surveys of the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS) study.

    RESULTS: Three persistent clusters were obtained at baseline and follow-up. Children consistently allocated to the 'processed' cluster presented increased BMI (β=0·050; 95 % CI 0·006, 0·093), increased waist circumference (β=0·071; 95 % CI 0·001, 0·141) and increased fat mass gain (β=0·052; 95 % CI 0·014, 0·090) over time v. children allocated to the 'healthy' cluster. Being in the 'processed'-'sweet' cluster combination was also linked to increased BMI (β=0·079; 95 % CI 0·015, 0·143), increased waist circumference (β=0·172; 95 % CI 0·069, 0·275) and increased fat mass gain (β=0·076; 95 % CI 0·019, 0·133) over time v. the 'healthy' cluster.

    CONCLUSIONS: Children consistently showing a processed dietary pattern or changing from a processed pattern to a sweet pattern presented the most unfavourable changes in fat mass and abdominal fat. These findings support the need to promote overall healthy dietary habits in obesity prevention and health promotion programmes targeting children.

  • 6.
    Huang, Christina Y.
    et al.
    Pardee Rand Grad Sch, Santa Monica, CA 90407 USA / RAND Corp, Santa Monica, CA 90407 USA.
    Reisch, Lucia A.
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Fac Med, Dept Paediat, Budapest, Hungary.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Tornaritis, Michalis
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, POB 453, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Siani, Alfonso
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    Fernandez-Alvira, Juan M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS GmbH, Bremen, Germany / Univ Bremen, Fac Math & Comp Sci, Bremen, Germany.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS GmbH, Bremen, Germany / Univ Bremen, Fac Math & Comp Sci, Bremen, Germany.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, POB 453, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pester power and its consequences: do European children's food purchasing requests relate to diet and weight outcomes?2016In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, no 13, p. 2393-2403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Children may influence household spending through pester power'. The present study examined pestering through parent-child food shopping behaviours in relation to children's diet and weight status. Design Cross-sectional and prospective analyses drawn from the IDEFICS study, a cohort study of parents and their children. Children's height and weight were measured and their recent diets were reported by parental proxy based on the Children's Eating Habits Questionnaire-FFQ at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Parents also completed questionnaires at both time points about pestering, including whether the child goes grocery shopping with them, asks for items seen on television and is bought requested food items. Setting Participants were recruited from eight European countries for the IDEFICS study (non-nationally representative sample). Subjects Study participants were children aged 2-9 years at enrolment and their parents. A total of 13 217 parent-child dyads were included at baseline. Two years later, 7820 of the children were re-examined. Results Most parents (63 %) at baseline reported sometimes' acquiescing to their children's requests to purchase specific foods. Pestering was modestly associated with weight and diet. At baseline, children whose parents often' complied consumed more high-sugar and high-fat foods. Children who often' asked for items seen on television were likely to become overweight after 2 years (OR=1<bold></bold>31), whereas never' asking protected against overweight (OR=0<bold></bold>72). Conclusions Pestering was modestly related to diet and weight in cross-sectional, but not longitudinal analyses. Asking for items seen on television had the most robust relationships across child outcomes and over time.

  • 7.
    Hunsberger, Monica
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lanfer, Anne
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, Bremen, Germany.
    Reeske, Anna
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, Bremen, Germany.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Russo, Paola
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Fac Med, Dept Pediat, Budapest, Hungary.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium / Univ Coll Ghent, Fac Hlth Care Vesalius, Dept Nutr & Dietet, Ghent, Belgium.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Infant feeding practices and prevalence of obesity in eight European countries - the IDEFICS study2013In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 219-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the association between exclusive breast-feeding and childhood overweight. Design: Cross-sectional data are from the baseline survey of the longitudinal cohort study IDEFICS. Exclusive rather than partial breast-feeding is the focus of the study due to the theoretical relationship between exclusive breast-feeding and development of dietary self-regulation. Children's measured heights and weights were used to calculate weight status, while waist-to-height ratio (WtHR) and skinfold measures were examined as alternative indicators of adiposity and fat patterning. Setting: Examination centres in eight European countries (Italy, Estonia, Cyprus, Belgium, Sweden, Hungary, Germany and Spain). Subjects: The analysis included 14 726 children aged 2-9 years for whom early feeding practices were reported by parents in standardized questionnaires. Results: After controlling for education, income and other potential confounders, breast-feeding exclusively for 4-6 months was protective of overweight (including obesity) when compared with children never exclusively breast-fed (OR=0.73; 95% CI 0.63, 0.85) across all measures of overweight. Exclusively breast-feeding for 6 months offered slightly more protection than for 4 and 5 months combined (OR=0.71; 95% CI 0.58, 0.85). The associations could not be explained by socio-economic characteristics or maternal overweight. Conclusions: This multi-country investigation indicated that exclusive breast-feeding for 4-6 months may confer protection against overweight in addition to other known benefits. There was no demonstrated benefit of exclusive breast-feeding for more than 6 months or combination feeding for any duration across all measures of overweight examined.

  • 8.
    Miguel Fernandez-Alvira, Juan
    et al.
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Univ Sch Hlth Sci, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Mouratidou, Theodora
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Univ Sch Hlth Sci, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Bammann, Karin
    Univ Bremen, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Univ Bremen, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    Sieri, Sabina
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Nutr Epidemiol Unit, Milan, Italy.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Dept Paediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Univ Sch Hlth Sci, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Parental education and frequency of food consumption in European children: the IDEFICS study2013In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 487-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the relationship between parental education level and the consumption frequency of obesity-related foods in European children. Design: The analysis was based on data from the cross-sectional baseline survey of a prospective cohort study. The effects of parental education on food consumption were explored using analysis of covariance and logistic regression. Setting: Primary schools and pre-schools of selected regions in Italy, Estonia, Cyprus, Belgium, Sweden, Hungary, Germany and Spain. Subjects: Participants (n 14 426) of the IDEFICS baseline cohort study aged 2 to 9 years. Results: Parental education level affected the intake of obesity-related foods in children. Children in the low and medium parental education level groups had lower odds of more frequently eating low-sugar and low-fat foods (vegetables, fruits, pasta/noodles/rice and wholemeal bread) and higher odds of more frequently eating high-sugar and high-fat foods (fried potatoes, fruits with sugar and nuts, snacks/desserts and sugared beverages; P<0.001). The largest odds ratio differences were found in the low category (reference category: high) for vegetables (OR=0.56; 95% CI 0.47, 0.65), fruits (OR=0.56; 95% CI 0.48, 0.65), fruits with sugar and nuts (OR=2.23; 95% CI 1.92, 2.59) and sugared beverages (OR=2.01; 95% CI 1.77, 2.37). Conclusions: Low parental education level was associated with intakes of sugar-rich and fatty foods among children, while high parental education level was associated with intakes of low-sugar and low-fat foods. These findings should be taken into account in public health interventions, with more targeted policies aiming at an improvement of children's diet.

  • 9.
    Prättälä, Ritva
    et al.
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Levälahti, Esko
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lallukka, Tea
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Männistö, Satu
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Paalanen, Laura
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Raulio, Susanna
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Roos, Eva
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Mäki-Opas, Tomi
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    From margarine to butter: predictors of changing bread spread in an 11-year population follow-up2016In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 1707-1717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Finland is known for a sharp decrease in the intake of saturated fat and cardiovascular mortality. Since 2000, however, the consumption of butter-containing spreads - an important source of saturated fats - has increased. We examined social and health-related predictors of the increase among Finnish men and women. Design: An 11-year population follow-up. Setting: A representative random sample of adult Finns, invited to a health survey in 2000. Subjects: Altogether 5414 persons aged 30-64 years at baseline in 2000 were re-invited in 2011. Of men 1529 (59 %) and of women 1853 (66 %) answered the questions on bread spreads at both time points. Respondents reported the use of bread spreads by choosing one of the following alternatives: no fat, soft margarine, butter-vegetable oil mixture and butter, which were later categorized into margarine/no spread and butter/butter-vegetable oil mixture (= butter). The predictors included gender, age, marital status, education, employment status, place of residence, health behaviours, BMI and health. Multinomial regression models were fitted. Results: Of the 2582 baseline margarine/no spread users, 24.6% shifted to butter. Only a few of the baseline sociodemographic or health-related determinants predicted the change. Finnish women were more likely to change to butter than men. Living with a spouse predicted the change among men. Conclusions: The change from margarine to butter between 2000 and 2011 seemed not to be a matter of compliance with official nutrition recommendations. Further longitudinal studies on social, behavioural and motivational predictors of dietary changes are needed.

  • 10.
    Santaliestra-Pasías, Alba M.
    et al.
    Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragosa, Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Dios, Jaime E. Llamas
    Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain.
    Sprengeler, Ole
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Felsö, Regina
    University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Lauria, Fabio
    National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    National Institute for Health Development, Center of Health and Behavioral Science, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragosa, Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Food and beverage intakes according to physical activity levels in European children: the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of Dietary and lifestyle induced health EFfects In Children and infantS) study2018In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1717-1725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Physical activity (PA) levels and dietary habits are considered some of the most important factors associated with obesity. The present study aimed to examine the association between PA level and food and beverage consumption in European children (2-10 years old).Design/Setting/SubjectsA sample of 7229 children (49·0 % girls) from eight European countries participating in the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of Dietary and lifestyle induced health EFfects In Children and infantS) study was included. Moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) was assessed objectively with accelerometers. FFQ was used to register dietary habits. ANCOVA and binary logistic regression were applied.

    RESULTS: Boys who spent less time in MVPA reported lower consumption of vegetables, fruits, cereals, yoghurt, milk, bread, pasta, candies and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) than boys who spent more time in MVPA (P<0·05). Moreover, boys who spent less time in MVPA were more likely to consume fast foods and water than those in the highest MVPA tertile (P<0·05). Girls who spent less time in MVPA reported lower consumption frequencies of vegetables, pasta, bread, yoghurt, candies, jam/honey and SSB than girls in the highest MVPA tertile (P<0·05). Also, girls in the lowest MVPA tertile were more likely to consume fast foods and water than those with high levels of MVPA (P<0·05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Food intake among European children varied with different levels of daily MVPA. Low time spent in MVPA was associated with lowest consumption of both high- and low-energy-dense foods and high fast-food consumption.

  • 11.
    Verbestel, Vera
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sports Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Bammann, Karin
    Univ Bremen, Inst Publ Hlth & Nursing Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res GmbH, Bremen, Germany.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalambos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Pitsiladis, Yannis
    Univ Glasgow, Coll Med Vet & Life Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Santaliestra-Pasias, Alba M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Univ Sch Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Maes, Lea
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sports Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Are context-specific measures of parental-reported physical activity and sedentary behaviour associated with accelerometer data in 2-9-year-old European children?2015In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 860-868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate if context-specific measures of parental-reported physical activity and sedentary behaviour are associated with objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in children. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Seven European countries taking part in the IDEFICS (Identification and Prevention of Dietary-and Lifestyle-induced Health Effects in Children and Infants) study. Subjects: Data were analysed from 2-9-year-old children (n 5982) who provided both parental-reported and accelerometer-derived physical activity/sedentary behaviour measures. Parents reported their children's daily screen-time, weekly sports participation and daily outdoor playtime by means of the Outdoor Playtime Checklist (OPC) and Outdoor Playtime Recall Questions (OPRQ). Results: Sports participation, OPC-and OPRQ-derived outdoor play were positively associated with accelerometer-derived physical activity. Television viewing and computer use were positively associated with accelerometer-derived sedentary time. All parental-reported measures that were significantly associated with accelerometer outcomes explained only a minor part of the variance in accelerometer-derived physical activity or sedentary time. Conclusions: Parental-reported measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour are not useful as a proxy for 2-9-year-old children's physical activity and sedentary time. Findings do not preclude the use of context-specific measures but imply that conclusions should be limited to the context-specific behaviours that are actually measured. Depending on the aim of the study, future research should carefully consider the choice of measurements, including the use of subjective or objective measures of the behaviour of interest or a combination of both.

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