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  • 1.
    Boernhorst, C.
    et al.
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Huybrechts, I.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium / Int Agcy Res Canc, Dietary Exposure Assessment Grp, F-69372 Lyon, France.
    Ahrens, W.
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Michels, N.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Pala, V.
    Fdn IRCSS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Nutr Epidemiol Unit, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Molnar, D.
    Univ Pecs, Fac Med, Dept Pediat, H-7623 Pecs, Hungary.
    Russo, P.
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, I-83100 Avellino, Italy.
    Barba, G.
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, I-83100 Avellino, Italy.
    Bel-Serrat, S.
    Univ Zaragoza, Escuela Univ Ciencias Salud, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Moreno, L. A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Escuela Univ Ciencias Salud, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Papoutsou, S.
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, CY-2027 Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, T.
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Ctr Hlth & Behav Sci, EE-11619 Tallinn, Estonia.
    Loit, H. M.
    Center of Health and Behavioral Science, National Institute for Health Development, Hiiu 42, 11619Tallinn, Estonia.
    Lissner, L.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Dietary Exposure Assessment Grp, F-69372 Lyon, France.
    Pigeot, I.
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Prevalence and determinants of misreporting among European children in proxy-reported 24 h dietary recalls2013In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 109, no 7, p. 1257-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary assessment is strongly affected by misreporting (both under-and over-reporting), which results in measurement error. Knowledge about misreporting is essential to correctly interpret potentially biased associations between diet and health outcomes. In young children, dietary data mainly rely on proxy respondents but little is known about determinants of misreporting here. The present analysis was conducted within the framework of the multi-centre IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary-and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) study and is based on 6101 children aged 2-9 years with 24 h dietary recall (24-HDR) and complete covariate information. Adapted Goldberg cut-offs were applied to classify the 24-HDR as 'over-report', 'plausible report' or 'under-report'. Backward elimination in the course of multi-level logistic regression analyses was conducted to identify factors significantly related to under-and over-reporting. Next to characteristics of the children and parents, social factors and parental concerns/perceptions concerning their child's weight status were considered. Further selective misreporting was addressed, investigating food group intakes commonly perceived as more or less socially desirable. Proportions of under-, plausible and over-reports were 8.0, 88.6 and 3.4%, respectively. The risk of under-reporting increased with age (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.05, 1.83), BMI z-score of the child (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.10, 1.37) and household size (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01, 1.25), and was higher in low/medium income groups (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.13, 1.86). Over-reporting was negatively associated with BMI z-scores of the child (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.69, 0.88) and higher in girls (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.27, 2.28). Further social desirability and parental concerns/perceptions seemed to influence the reporting behaviour. Future studies should involve these determinants of misreporting when investigating diet-disease relationships in children to correct for the differential reporting bias.

  • 2.
    Iguacel, Isabel
    et al.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Edificio SAI,C Pedro Cerbuna S-N, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Inst Agroalimentario Aragon IA2, C Miguel Servet 177, Zaragoza 50013, Spain.;Inst Invest Sanitaria Aragon IIS Aragon, Avda San Juan Bosco 13, Zaragoza 50009, Spain.
    Fernandez-Alvira, Juan M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Edificio SAI,C Pedro Cerbuna S-N, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Fdn Ctr Nacl Invest Cardiovasc Carlos III CNIC, C Melchor Fernandez Almagro 3, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Bammann, Karin
    Univ Bremen, Inst Publ Hlth & Nursing Sci IPP, Grazer Str 2, D-28359 Bremen, Germany / Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    De Clercq, Bart
    Univ Ghent, Univ Hosp, Dept Publ Hlth, Block 4K3,De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit EPI, Medicinaregatan 16a,Van 2, S-41390 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Solbjerg Pl 3, DK-2000 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Dept Paediat, Szigeti Str 12, H-7624 Pecs, Hungary.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Papoutsou, Stalo
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, 138 Limassol Ave, CY-2015 Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Russo, Paola
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, I-83100 Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Chron Dis, Hiiu 42, EE-11619 Tallinn, Estonia.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Boernhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Edificio SAI,C Pedro Cerbuna S-N, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.;Inst Agroalimentario Aragon IA2, C Miguel Servet 177, Zaragoza 50013, Spain.;Inst Invest Sanitaria Aragon IIS Aragon, Avda San Juan Bosco 13, Zaragoza 50009, Spain.;Ctr Invest Biomed Red Fisiopatol Obesidad & Nutr, C Sinesio Delgado 4, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Associations between social vulnerabilities and dietary patterns in European children: the Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS) study2016In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 116, no 7, p. 1288-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-economic inequalities in childhood can determine dietary patterns, and therefore future health. This study aimed to explore associations between social vulnerabilities and dietary patterns assessed at two time points, and to investigate the association between accumulation of vulnerabilities and dietary patterns. A total of 9301 children aged 2-9 years participated at baseline and 2-year follow-up examinations of the Identification and prevention of Dietary-and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS study. In all, three dietary patterns were identified at baseline and follow-up by applying the K-means clustering algorithm based on a higher frequency of consumption of snacks and fast food (processed), sweet foods and drinks (sweet), and fruits and vegetables (healthy). Vulnerable groups were defined at baseline as follows: children whose parents lacked a social network, children from single-parent families, children of migrant origin and children with unemployed parents. Multinomial mixed models were used to assess the associations between social vulnerabilities and children's dietary patterns at baseline and follow-up. Children whose parents lacked a social network (OR 1.31; 99% CI 1.01, 1.70) and migrants (OR 1.45; 99% CI 1.15, 1.83) were more likely to be in the processed cluster at baseline and follow-up. Children whose parents were homemakers (OR 0.74; 99% CI 0.60, 0.92) were less likely to be in the processed cluster at baseline. A higher number of vulnerabilities was associated with a higher probability of children being in the processed cluster (OR 1.78; 99% CI 1.21, 2.62). Therefore, special attention should be paid to children of vulnerable groups as they present unhealthier dietary patterns.

  • 3.
    Miguel Fernandez-Alvira, Juan
    et al.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Boernhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Bammann, Karin
    Univ Bremen, Inst Publ Hlth & Nursing Sci IPP, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Epidemiol Unit, Milan, Italy.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit EPI, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Iglesia, Iris
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Veidebaum, Tomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Chron Dis, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kourides, Yannis A.
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Dept Paediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium / Int Agcy Res Canc, Dietary Exposure Assessment Grp, F-69372 Lyon, France.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Stat, Fac Math & Comp Sci, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Prospective associations between socio-economic status and dietary patterns in European children: the Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-induced Health Effects in Children and Infants (IDEFICS) Study2015In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 113, no 3, p. 517-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring changes in children's diet over time and the relationship between these changes and socio-economic status (SES) may help to understand the impact of social inequalities on dietary patterns. The aim of the present study was to describe dietary patterns by applying a cluster analysis to 9301 children participating in the baseline (2-9 years old) and follow-up (4-11 years old) surveys of the Identification and Prevention of Dietary-and Lifestyle-induced Health Effects in Children and Infants Study, and to describe the cluster memberships of these children over time and their association with SES. We applied the K-means clustering algorithm based on the similarities between the relative frequencies of consumption of forty-two food items. The following three consistent clusters were obtained at baseline and follow-up: processed (higher frequency of consumption of snacks and fast food); sweet (higher frequency of consumption of sweet foods and sweetened drinks); healthy (higher frequency of consumption of fruits, vegetables and wholemeal products). Children with higher-educated mothers and fathers and the highest household income were more likely to be allocated to the healthy cluster at baseline and follow-up and less likely to be allocated to the sweet cluster. Migrants were more likely to be allocated to the processed cluster at baseline and follow-up. Applying the cluster analysis to derive dietary patterns at the two time points allowed us to identify groups of children from a lower socio-economic background presenting persistently unhealthier dietary profiles. This finding reflects the need for healthy eating interventions specifically targeting children from lower socio-economic backgrounds.

1 - 3 of 3
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  • ieee
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