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  • 1.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    School of Health, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Nursing students perform their clinical practice in different types of clinical settings. The clinical learning environment is important for students to be able to achieve desired learning outcomes. Knowledge is lacking about the learning environment in different clinical settings. Aim: The aim was to compare the learning environment in different clinical settings from the perspective of the nursing students. Design: A cross-sectional study with comparative design was conducted. Method: Data was collected from 185 nursing students at three universities by means of a questionnaire involving the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) evaluation scale. An open-ended question was added in order to ascertain reasons for dissatisfaction with the clinical placement. Results: The nursing students' satisfaction with the placement did not differ between clinical settings. However, those with clinical placement in hospital departments agreed more strongly that sufficient meaningful learning situations occurred and that learning situations were multi-dimensional. Some students reported that the character of the clinical setting made it difficult to achieve the learning objectives. Conclusion: In the planning of the clinical placement, attention must be paid to whether the setting offers the student a meaningful learning situation where the appropriate learning outcome may be achieved. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences, Östersund, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Strang, Susann
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden / Karolinska Institutet, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Stockholm, Sweden / Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons: A longitudinal study2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, p. 12-20, article id S1471-5953(17)30384-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Barbro
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ways of strategies to knowing the patient described by nursing students2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 38, p. 120-125Article in journal (Refereed)
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