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  • 1.
    Björk, Maria
    et al.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nordström, Berit
    Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hallström, Inger
    Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden / Vårdal Institute, Lund University.
    Needs of young children with cancer during their initial hospitalization: An observational study2006In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 210-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe young (under the age of 7) children's needs as expressed by their behavior, body language and verbal expression through observations during their initial hospitalization after being diagnosed with cancer. Twelve children under the age of seven were followed during 26 hours with non-participant unstructured observations. Field notes were written after each observation and transcribed into a narrative text, which was analyzed by content analysis at both manifest and latent level. Five themes were identified, of which "need to have the parent close by" was the most prominent. The other themes were "need to play and feel joy," "need for participation in care and treatment," "need for a good relationship with the staff," and "need for physical and emotional satisfaction." The results indicate that the children needed their parents and the parents' presence helped the children to express other needs. Professionals need to support the child and his or her parents so that the parents in their turn can support and alleviate their child's hospitalization and cancer treatment. © 2006 by Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses.

  • 2.
    Björk, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Lund University, Sweden.
    Wiebe, Thomas
    Department of Pediatrics, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Hallström, Inger
    Department of Nursing/the Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Striving to survive: Families' lived experiences when a child is diagnosed with cancer2005In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 265-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a child is ill with cancer, this affects the whole family for long periods. The aim of this study was to elucidate the family's lived experience when a child in the family was diagnosed with cancer. A descriptive inductive design with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach including interviews with 17 families (parents, children, and siblings) was chosen. The families' lived experience was described as a 2-fold essential theme comprising "a broken life world" and an immediate "striving to survive." The families' secure everyday life disappeared and was replaced by fear, chaos, and loneliness. When striving to make the child and the family survive, family members strove to feel hope and have a positive focus, to gain control, and to feel close to other people. Phenomenological human science research can deepen the understanding of the meaning of being a family with a child who is ill with cancer and can help pediatric oncology staff become increasingly thoughtful, and thus better prepared to take action to diminish the chaos occurring in the family. © 2005 by Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses.

  • 3.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden / University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden / University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Following Young Children's Health and Functioning in Everyday Life Through Their Cancer Trajectory2016In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 173-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge of living with childhood cancer, through the trajectory, is sparse. Aim: The aim of this study was to follow young children's health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory. Methods: Data were gathered longitudinally from a group of 13 young children and their parents connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Sweden. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth structure was used to identify difficulties in health and functioning in everyday life, in interview and questionnaire data. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to show patterns of difficulty over a 3-year period from diagnosis. Results: Difficulties experienced by children declined and changed over time. An increase in difficulties with personal interactions with others and access to and support from health care professionals was seen 2 to 3 years after diagnosis and start of treatment. Similar patterns are seen within individual children's trajectories in relation to diagnosis but individual patterns were seen for each child. Conclusions and Clinical Implications: Health care professionals need to plan for ongoing contact with school services and information and support pathways, beyond the treatment period. A person-centered philosophy of care is required throughout the cancer trajectory.

  • 4.
    Enskär, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Being an Expert Nurse in Pediatric Oncology Care: Nurses' Descriptions in Narratives2012In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pediatric oncology has become a highly specialized area, and the transition from novice nurse to expert can be complicated. The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions of nurses in pediatric oncology regarding the role of an expert nurse in pediatric oncology. Nurses (n = 66) working in pediatric oncology participated by writing their narratives. The data were analyzed by means of content analysis, and 3 categories were found: an expert has confidence in his or her knowledge, an expert provides high-quality care, and an expert is given possibilities for professional growth. It can be concluded that when nurses are given possibilities for continuous education and reflection, and have a feeling of satisfaction at being able to fulfill a child and his or her family's needs, this enhances their possibility to become experts and maintain expert competence.

  • 5.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Hallström, Inger
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Living an Everyday Life Through a Child's Cancer Trajectory: Families' Lived Experiences 7 Years After Diagnosis2013In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 293-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the lived experiences of families where a child had survived 7 years from a diagnosis of childhood cancer. This article describes one part of an inductive and longitudinal research project that included 17 families. Four families whose child was diagnosed with cancer 7 years previously were interviewed using a hermeneutical phenomenological approach. The families lived experience was described in one essential theme, "Living an everyday life through the child's cancer trajectory," further illuminated in 3 related themes: "Leaving the disease behind yet feeling its presence," "Being the same yet always different," and "Feeling stronger yet vulnerable." The results suggest that family members feel vulnerable even if a long period of time has passed since completion of treatment. To varied degrees they still may need support. When moving forward in life, the family members are helped if they can reconcile their memories and experiences derived from the childhood cancer trajectory. © 2013 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

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