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  • 1.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Angered, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Angered Local Hospital, Angered, Sweden / University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden / Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Death and caring for dying patients: exploring first-year nursing students' descriptive experiences2014In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 509-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe first-year nursing student`s expereinces of witnessing death and providing end-of-life care. Methods: This study is a part of a larger longitudial prject. Interviews (n=17) were conducted with nursing students at the end of their fisrt year of education. To analyse the interviews (lived-expereince description), a thematic analysis, "a search for meaning" (Van Manen, 1997) was applied. Result: The results are presented within the framework of four separate themes: (1) The thought of death is more frightening than the actual epereince, (2) Daring to approach the dying patient and offering something of oneself, (3) The expereince of not sufficing in the face of death and (4) being confronted with one`s own feelings. Conclusion: Nursing students require continous support and opportunity to reflect and discuss their experiences about caring for dying patients and confronting death throughout the entirety of their education. In addition, teachers and clinical superviosors need t give support using reflective practice to help students to devlo confidence in their capacity for caring dying patients.

  • 2.
    Hagelin, Carina Lundh
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden / Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Nursing, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden / Institute of Caring Sciences and Health, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Institute of Caring Sciences and Health, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered's Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    Institute of Caring Sciences and Health, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Österlind, Jane
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students2016In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated.

    METHOD: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used.

    RESULTS: Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude.

    CONCLUSION: Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.

  • 3.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences and Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences and Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hagelin, Carina Lundh
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences and Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Jönköping University, Department of Nursing School of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Undergraduate nursing students' transformational learning during clinical training2018In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 184-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Undergraduate nursing students encounter patients at the end of life during their clinical training. They need to confront dying and death under supportive circumstances in order to be prepared for similar situations in their future career.

    Aim: To explore undergraduate nursing students' descriptions of caring situations with patients at the end of life during supervised clinical training.

    Methods: A qualitative study using the critical incident technique was chosen. A total of 85 students wrote a short text about their experiences of caring for patients at the end of life during their clinical training. These critical incident reports were then analysed using deductive and inductive content analysis.

    Findings: The theme 'students' transformational learning towards becoming a professional nurse during clinical training' summarises how students relate to patients and relatives, interpret the transition from life to death, feel when caring for a dead body and learn end-of-life caring actions from their supervisors.

    Implications: As a preparation for their future profession, students undergoing clinical training need to confront death and dying while supported by trained supervisors and must learn how to communicate about end-of-life issues and cope with emotional stress and grief.

  • 4.
    Slåtten, Kari
    et al.
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Oslo.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Oslo / Buskerud University College, Drammen, Norway.
    Hatlevik, Ove Edvard
    Center for ICT in Education, University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo, Norway.
    Clinical competence in palliative care in Norway: the importance of good care routines2010In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This paper examines how clinical nurse specialists assessed their competences in relief of symptoms, and explores factors affecting good care routines in palliative care. Methods: A prospective survey among 235 former post-bachelor (response rate 50.6 %) students at two university colleges in Norway. Results: Correlations between the measured concepts showed a medium to high correlation between all the five competences. Use of care routines correlated with all the other factors. The ability to identify lack of care showed significant correlation with one concept: time available for nursing. The results from the regression analysis supported a model with good care routines as dependent variable (F=22.59, df=91, P<0.001). The independent variables in the model explained almost 57% of the variance in using care routines. Competences dealing with mouth problems, nausea, anxiety and the use of the Edmonton symptom assessment system (ESAS) had a positive effect on care routines. On the other hand, the ability to identify lack of care had a significant negative effect on the use of care routines. Conclusion: The importance of systematic assessment of the palliative patient's care needs and symptom management are emphasized, and use of the ESAS, and good care routines was affected by post-bachelor competences.

  • 5.
    Strang, Susann
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College / Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Sweden.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College / Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden / University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swedish nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding issues in caring for dying patients2014In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding questions concerning the care of dying patients.

    METHODS: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) Scale was completed by students at the beginning of their education, and there was great variation in the responses to five items. At a follow-up measurement in the second year, an open-ended question, 'How did you reason when completing this question?', was added to each of the these five items. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the responses.

    RESULTS: Of 140 students who completed the FATCOD, 111 provided free-text responses. The analysis of these responses revealed three themes: death perceptions, the students' understanding of their current situation, and the nurse's responsibility.

    CONCLUSION: This study provides useful information on students' reasoning about emotionally demanding questions relating to the care of dying patients. Such knowledge is valuable in helping students to overcome their fear and fulfil their expectations concerning their future proficiency.

1 - 5 of 5
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