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  • 1.
    Backman, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Carl Johan
    Department of Physiology & Pharmacology and Unit for Bioentrepreneurship, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden / Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Experiencing health - Physical activity during adjuvant chemotherapy treatment for women with breast cancer2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 21, p. 160-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to explore how women with breast cancer experience physical activity (PA) during adjuvant chemotherapy treatment.

    METHODS: This study included sixteen women diagnosed with breast cancer who had participated in a supervised 16-week PA intervention during adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. The qualitative approach included semi-structured individual and focus group interviews. Data were analyzed inductively with content analysis.

    RESULT: The content analysis resulted in a description of experiencing health during chemotherapy treatment covered by five categories: Solidarity with others and being good to oneself; Experiencing functional improvement and social support; Empowerment and motivation to focus on health; Barriers to adherence to PA during illness and treatment; and Enabling health and independence. A core category was identified; PA a tool for maintenance and recovery of physical, mental and social health. The women reported that PA had a positive impact on both physical function and mental wellbeing. Participating in the PA intervention also increased their feeling of social support, which was reported to be important to motivate adherence to PA when the side effects became more severe. Symptom burden, time and lack of motivation were reported as barriers to continue PA during treatment.

    CONCLUSION: The women in this study reported that PA had a positive impact on their perceived health and that it was possible to exercise despite increasing symptom burden from treatment. PA was perceived as a tool that supported health processes and gave the women a feeling of getting respite from the illness.

  • 2.
    Björk, Maria
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Nordström, Berit
    Lund University, Department of Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Wiebe, Thomas
    Lund University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lund, Sweden.
    Hallström, Inger
    Lund University, Department of Health Sciences, The Vårdal Institute, Lund, Sweden.
    Living With Childhood Cancer - Family Members' Experiences and Needs2009In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 60-60Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Björk, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. CHILD Research Group, Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hallström, Inger
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket: Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to illuminate parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer. Method: Interviews and a narrative about parents' experiences of losing a child to cancer were gathered from six parents of children whom had participated in a longitudinal study across the child's illness trajectory. The analysis of the data was inspired by van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Results: One essential theme emerged: Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket, as well as six related themes: Feeling conflicting emotions, Preparing for the moment of death, Continuing parenting after death, Recollecting and sharing memories, Working through the sorrow and New perspectives in life. Conclusion: There is a need for good palliative care. If not, there is a risk that the parent will perseverate and blame themselves for not being a good parent during the suffering child's last time in life. Meetings with the parents six months and two years after the child's death might facilitate healing through the grief process. 

  • 4.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden / Department NVS, Section for Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Kay
    Department NVS, Section for Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department NVS, Section for Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Ann-Kristin
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nyman, Maria Hälleberg
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department NVS, Section for Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Symptoms and self-care strategies during and six months after radiotherapy for prostate cancer - Scoping the perspectives of patients, professionals and literature2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 21, p. 139-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Under-diagnosed and uncontrolled symptoms in patients with prostate cancer during radiotherapy can have a negative impact on the individual's quality of life. An opportunity for patients to report their symptoms systematically, communicate these symptoms to cancer nurses and to receive self-care advice via an application in an Information and Communication Technology-platform could overcome this risk. The content in the application must precisely capture symptoms that are significant to both patients and health care professionals. Therefore, the aim of the study was to map and describe symptoms and self-care strategies identified by patients with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy, by health care professionals caring for these patients, and in the literature.

    METHODS: The study combines data from interviews with patients (n = 8) and health care professionals (n = 10) and a scoping review of the literature (n = 26) focusing on the period during and up to 6 months after radiotherapy.

    RESULTS: There was a concordance between the patients, health care professionals, and the literature on symptoms during and after radiotherapy. Urinary symptoms, bowel problems, pain, sexual problems, fatigue, anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment and irregular symptoms were commonly described during the initial treatment period. Self-care strategies were rarely described in all three of the sources.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results show which symptoms to regularly assess using an Information and Communication Technology-platform for patients with newly-diagnosed prostate cancer during radiotherapy. The next step is to evaluate the efficacy of using the platform and the accuracy of the selected symptoms and self-care advice included in a smartphone application.

  • 5.
    Browall, Maria
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden / Department of Oncology, Division of Selected Clinical Specialties, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ahlberg, Karin
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Per
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden / Department of Oncology, Southern Älvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden / Department of Health Science, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Persson, Lars-Olof
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gaston-Johansson, Fannie
    School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Health-related quality of life during adjuvant treatment for breast cancer among postmenopausal women2008In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 180-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was twofold: first, to describe changes of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) during the adjuvant treatment among postmenopausal women with breast cancer; second, in the same population to identify the best predictors of Overall Quality of Life (QoL) after treatment, from perceived functioning, symptoms, emotional distress and clinical/demographic variables measured at baseline. The study group was 150 women (>= 55 years of age) scheduled for adjuvant chemotherapy (CT, n=75) or radiotherapy (RT, n=75). They were examined before (baseline), during and after completing the treatment. Data about QoL, perceived functioning, symptoms and emotional distress were collected with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)-QLQ-C30, BR23 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaires. The general finding was that the adjuvant treatments were associated with decrease in overall QoL, physical and role functioning, anxiety and body image, as well as with increase in fatigue, dyspnoea, pain, nausea/vomiting, constipation and systemic therapy side effects measured over time. For women receiving CT, better emotional functioning and less pain at baseline predicted better overall QoL at the end of the treatment. For women receiving RT, better physical and emotional functioning, less breast symptoms and lower tumour stage at baseline predicted better overall QoL at the end of the treatment. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Browall, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg 413 45, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Maria
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Döbelnsgatan 2, Uppsala 752 37, Sweden.
    Horvath, György
    Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg 413 45, Sweden.
    Information needs of women with recently diagnosed ovarian cancer - A longitudinal study2004In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 200-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the information needs among patients with ovarian cancer and whether these information needs change over time. The information needs were evaluated three times, through structured interviews, and were based on the paired comparison approach developed by Degner and colleagues. A consecutive sample of patients (n=82) with recently diagnosed ovarian cancer was asked to participate.Sixty-four patients (78%) chose to participate. The three different measurements of participants' information needs revealed only small changes in these needs. The three most important information needs, in all measurements, were information about the likelihood of cure, information about the stage and spreading of the disease, and information about different treatment options. Information regarding sexual attractiveness was the lowest ranked item in all measurements. Regarding subgroups (age, education) the only significant difference throughout all measurements was that younger patients rated issues of sexual attractiveness higher than older patients (p=0.005).In this longitudinal study patients with ovarian cancer ranked information about the disease and its treatment (i.e. likelihood of cure, stage of disease, and treatment options) highest, and information about psychosocial aspects and self-care lowest. These findings are in accordance with the results from studies of women diagnosed with other types of cancer, which used the same methodology. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Browall, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Karolinska Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden / University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Nursing, Östersund, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden / Mid Sweden University, Department of Nursing, Östersund, Sweden.
    Existential encounters: Nurses' descriptions of critical incidents in end-of-life cancer care2014In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 636-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nurses working with cancer patients in end of life care need to be prepared to encounter patients' psychosocial and spiritual distress. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of existential situations when caring for patients severely affected by cancer. Methods and sample: Nurses (registered and enrolled) from three urban in-patient hospices, an oncology clinic and a surgery clinic and a palliative homecare team were, prior to the start of a training program, invited to write down their experiences of a critical incident (CI), in which existential issues were featured. Results: Eighty-eight CIs were written by 83 nurses. The CIs were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Two main themes were found: Encounters with existential pain experiences, which concerned facing death and facing losses; and Encountering experiences of hope, which concerned balancing honesty, and desire to live. Conclusions: This study points out that health care professionals need to be aware of patients' feelings of abandonment in exposed situations such as patients' feelings of existential loneliness. That there are some patients that express a desire to die and this makes the nurses feel uncomfortable and difficult to confront these occurrences and its therefore important to listen to patients' stories, regardless of care organization, in order to gain access to patients' inner existential needs. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Sciences, CHILD Research Group, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden / School of Health Sciences, University College Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Nursing Sciences, CHILD Research Group, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Department of Nursing Sciences, CHILD Research Group, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Department of Nursing Sciences, CHILD Research Group, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden / School of Health Sciences, University College Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    The process of striving for an ordinary, everyday life, in young children living with cancer, at six months and one year post diagnosis2014In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 605-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Health care focus is shifting from solely looking at surviving cancer to elements of attention relating to living with it on a daily basis.The young child's experiences are crucial to providing evidence based care. The aim of this study was to explore the everyday life of young children as expressed by the child and parents at six months and one year post diagnosis.

    METHODS: Interviews were conducted with children and their parents connected to a paediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden. A qualitative content analysis of interview data from two time points, six months and one year post diagnosis, was carried out.

    RESULTS: The process of living with cancer at six months and at one year post diagnosis revealed the child's striving for an ordinary, everyday life. Experiences over time of gaining control, making a normality of the illness and treatment and feeling lonely were described.

    CONCLUSION: Nurses have a major role to play in the process of striving for a new normal in the world post-diagnosis, and provide essential roles by giving the young child information, making them participatory in their care and encouraging access to both parents and peers. Understanding this role and addressing these issues regularly can assist the young child in the transition to living with cancer. Longitudinal studies with young children are vital in capturing their experiences through the cancer trajectory and necessary to ensure quality care.

  • 9.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Jönköping, Sweden / Jönköping Univ, CHILD Res Grp, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Jönköping Univ, CHILD Res Grp, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Jönköping, Sweden / Univ Coll Borås, Dept Hlth Sci, Borås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Jönköping, Sweden / Jönköping Univ, CHILD Res Grp, Jönköping, Sweden..
    Darcy, Laura
    Jönköping Univ, CHILD Res Grp, Jönköping, Sweden / Univ Coll Borås, Dept Hlth Sci, Borås, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Jönköping, Sweden / Jönköping Univ, CHILD Res Grp, Jönköping, Sweden.
    A Swedish perspective on nursing and psychosocial research in paediatric oncology: A literature review2015In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 310-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A dramatic improvement in outcomes of survival rates of childhood cancer has been seen. Caring science research is central in providing skills and knowledge to the health care sector, but few overviews of the content of published research have been carried out. The aim of this review was to investigate the content and methodology of published studies in paediatric oncology relevant to caring science, and also to compare possible differences in content and method of the published studies from the nursing and psychosocial perspectives. Method: A systematic literature review was performed of 137 published articles on paediatric oncology relevant to caring science in Sweden. Results: The results show that most of the studies were descriptive or comparative ones with a quantitative design. Most of them focused on parents (43%) or children (28%). Most of the studies investigated wellbeing (88%), using questionnaires (54%) or interviews (38%). Several different measurement instruments had been used. While the results were often clearly presented, the clinical implications were more diffuse. The most acknowledged research fund was the Swedish Childhood Foundation (75%). Conclusions: To reflect the children' perspectives in paediatric oncology require that future researchers take on the challenge of including children (even young ones) in research. The use of a limited number of agreed measurement instruments is desirable. The biggest challenge for the future is to make a shift from explorative to intervention studies. There is an urgent need to transform research results into clinical practice. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Gustavell, Tina
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden / Karolinska University Hospital, Gastrocentrum, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Kay
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frank, Catharina
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden / Karolinska University Hospital, Breast and Sarcoma Unit, Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Segersvärd, Ralf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Gastrocentrum, Stockholm, Sweden / Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Surgery, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Symptoms and self-care following pancreaticoduodenectomy: Perspectives from patients and healthcare professionals - Foundation for an interactive ICT application2017In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 26, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposePoor prognosis and a problematic recovery period after pancreaticoduodenectomy means that patients may benefit from early detection of symptoms and support for self-management. Interactive Information and Communication Technology tools can be used for this purpose, but the content needs to be relevant to patients as well as healthcare professionals. To facilitate development of the content of an application for this purpose, the aim of this study was to explore common symptoms and self-care in the first six months after pancreaticoduodenectomy, as identified by patients and healthcare professionals.

    MethodData were collected through individual interviews with patients (n = 14), along with two focus group interviews and one individual interview with healthcare professionals (n = 10). Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    ResultsCommon symptoms after surgery were those related to eating, bowel function and emotional wellbeing, along with fatigue and pain. Some self-care activities and advice were mentioned in the interviews. The patients often experienced a lack of advice on self-care at discharge.

    ConclusionsThe results render knowledge of the symptoms it is important to be aware of and to assess regularly after pancreaticoduodenectomy. The results also contribute to knowledge about specific self-care related to these symptoms, even though it was not extensively described, and further research is needed to define evidence-based self-care advice.

  • 11.
    Odh, Ida
    et al.
    Home Care, Götene County, Hällekis, Sweden.
    Löfving, Martina
    Infection Ward, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Klaeson, Kicki
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Oncology Department, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Existential challenges in young people living with a cancer diagnosis2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 24, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In Sweden, approximately 500 people between the ages of 15 and 39 are diagnosed with cancer each year. When someone is diagnosed with a life-threatening disease, existential issues are easily triggered. Young adults are in a developmental phase of life and are exposed to an extra amount of pressure. The Internet and social media are a daily part of the life of young adults and the use of blogs is common. The aim of this study was to elucidate the theoretical framework of Yalom and his four 'givens' expressed in blogs written by young adults living with various cancer diagnoses in Sweden. Method: This study used a qualitative method in which written stories from six public blogs were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The findings offer valuable in-depth knowledge about the existential issues in this population. The results can be described as a journey with several existential challenges and with death as an impending threat. The bloggers' awareness of their mortality was described as creating a sense of loss and existential loneliness. Conclusions: This study shows that young adults are empowered by the writing of blogs and that blogs can play an important part in increasing wellbeing and a sense of coherence within this population. 

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