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  • 1.
    Holmgren, Gustav
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. AstraZeneca Gothenburg, CVMD GMed, GMD, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Andersson, Christian X.
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Anders
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Expression profiling of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes exposed to doxorubicin - integration and visualization of multi omics data2018In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 163, no 1, p. 182-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin, are highly efficient chemotherapeutic agents against a variety of cancers. However, anthracyclines are also among the most cardiotoxic therapeutic drugs presently on the market. Chemotherapeutic-induced cardiomyopathy is one of the leading causes of disease and mortality in cancer survivors. The exact mechanisms responsible for doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy are not completely known, but the fact that the cardiotoxicity is dose-dependent and that there is a variation in time-to-onset of toxicity, and gender- and age differences suggests that several mechanisms may be involved.In the present study, we investigated doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes using proteomics. In addition, different sources of omics data (protein, mRNA, and microRNA) from the same experimental setup were further combined and analyzed using newly developed methods to identify differential expression in data of various origin and types. Subsequently, the results were integrated in order to generate a combined visualization of the findings.In our experimental model system, we exposed cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells to doxorubicin for up to two days, followed by a wash-out period of additionally 12 days. Besides an effect on the cell morphology and cardiomyocyte functionality, the data show a strong effect of doxorubicin on all molecular levels investigated. Differential expression patterns that show a linkage between the proteome, transcriptome, and the regulatory microRNA network, were identified. These findings help to increase the understanding of the mechanisms behind anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and suggest putative biomarkers for this condition.

  • 2.
    Karim, Md Rezaul
    et al.
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh / Islamic University, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Mashiur
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Islam, Khairul
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Al Mamun, Abdullah
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Shakhawoat
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Ekhtear
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Aziz, Abdul
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Yeasmin, Fouzia
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Agarwal, Smita
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Md Imam
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Saud, Zahangir Alam
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Nikkon, Farjana
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Mostaque
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jenkins, Richard O.
    De Montfort University, United Kingdom .
    Haris, Parvez I.
    De Montfort University, United Kingdom .
    Miyataka, Hideki
    Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Himeno, Seiichiro
    Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.
    Increases in Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein and Other Inflammatory and Adhesion Molecules With a Concomitant Decrease in High-Density Lipoprotein in the Individuals Exposed to Arsenic in Bangladesh2013In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elevated exposure to arsenic has been suggested to be associated with atherosclerosis leading to cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, biochemical events underlying the arsenic-induced atherosclerosis have not yet been fully documented. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of circulating molecules involved in atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure in the individuals exposed to arsenic in Bangladesh. A total of 324 study subjects, 218 from arsenic-endemic areas and 106 from nonendemic areas in Bangladesh, were recruited. Drinking water, hair, nail, and blood samples were collected from the study subjects for analysis. Total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were lower in arsenic-endemic subjects than those of nonendemic subjects. Oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) levels were significantly higher in arsenic-endemic subjects than those in nonendemic subjects. All these circulating molecules showed significant correlations with arsenic exposure (water, hair, and nail arsenic concentrations), and all these relations were significant before and after adjusting for relevant covariates. Among the circulating molecules tested in this study, HDL, Ox-LDL, and CRP showed dose-response relationships with arsenic exposure. Ox-LDL/ HDL ratios were increased with the increasing concentrations of arsenic in the water, hair, and nails. Furthermore, non-HDL cholesterol and TC/ HDL ratios were significantly correlated with arsenic exposure before and after adjusting for relevant covariates. Thus, all the observed associations may be the major features of arsenic exposure-related atherosclerosis leading to CVD.

  • 3.
    Kia, Richard
    et al.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, MRC Ctr Drug Safety Sci, Liverpool, England.
    Kelly, Lorna
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, England / Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England.
    Sison-Young, Rowena L. C.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, MRC Ctr Drug Safety Sci, Liverpool, England.
    Zhang, Fang
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, England / Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England.
    Pridgeon, Chris S.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, England / Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England.
    Heslop, James A.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, MRC Ctr Drug Safety Sci, Liverpool, England.
    Metcalfe, Pete
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, MRC Ctr Drug Safety Sci, Liverpool, England.
    Kitteringham, Neil R.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, England / Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England.
    Baxter, Melissa
    Univ Manchester, Fac Life Sci, Manchester, England / Univ Cent Lancashire, Sch Med & Dent, Preston, England.
    Harrison, Sean
    Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England / Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Med & Human Sci, Ctr Endocrinol & Diabet,Inst Human Dev, Manchester, England.
    Hanley, Neil A.
    Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England / Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Med & Human Sci, Ctr Endocrinol & Diabet,Inst Human Dev, Manchester, England / Cent Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Endocrinol Dept, Manchester England.
    Burke, Zoe D.
    Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England / Univ Bath, Dept Biol & Biochem, Ctr Regenerat Med, Bath, England.
    Storm,, Mike P.
    Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England / Univ Bath, Dept Biol & Biochem, Ctr Regenerat Med, Bath, England.
    Welham, Melanie J.
    Univ Bath, Dept Biol & Biochem, Ctr Regenerat Med, Bath, England.
    Tosh, David
    Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England / Univ Bath, Dept Biol & Biochem, Ctr Regenerat Med, Bath, England.
    Küppers-Munther, Barbara
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Edsbagge, Josefina
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lewis, Philip J. Starkey
    Univ Edinburgh, MRC Ctr Regenerat Med, Edinburgh EH16 4UU, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Bonner, Frank
    Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England.
    Harpur, Ernie
    Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England / Newcastle Univ, Inst Cellular Med, Sch Med, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE2 4HH, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Sidaway, James
    Univ Edinburgh, MRC Ctr Regenerat Med, Edinburgh EH16 4UU, Midlothian, Scotland / AstraZeneca R&D, Drug Safety & Metab, Cheshire, England.
    Bowes, Joanne
    Univ Edinburgh, MRC Ctr Regenerat Med, Edinburgh EH16 4UU, Midlothian, Scotland / AstraZeneca R&D, Drug Safety & Metab, Cheshire, England.
    Fenwick, Stephen W.
    Aintree Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, North Western Hepatobiliary Unit, Liverpool, England.
    Malik, Hassan
    Aintree Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, North Western Hepatobiliary Unit, Liverpool, England.
    Goldring, Chris E. P.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, MRC Ctr Drug Safety Sci, Liverpool, England / Stem Cells Safer Med, London England.
    Park, B. Kevin
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Pharmacol, MRC Ctr Drug Safety Sci, Liverpool, England / Stem Cells Safer Med, London, England.
    MicroRNA-122: a novel hepatocyte-enriched in vitro marker of drug-induced cellular toxicity2015In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 173-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging hepatic models for the study of drug-induced toxicity include pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) and complex hepatocyte-non-parenchymal cellular coculture to mimic the complex multicellular interactions that recapitulate the niche environment in the human liver. However, a specific marker of hepatocyte perturbation, required to discriminate hepatocyte damage from non-specific cellular toxicity contributed by non-hepatocyte cell types or immature differentiated cells is currently lacking, as the cytotoxicity assays routinely used in in vitro toxicology research depend on intracellular molecules which are ubiquitously present in all eukaryotic cell types. In this study, we demonstrate that microRNA-122 (miR-122) detection in cell culture media can be used as a hepatocyte-enriched in vitro marker of drug-induced toxicity in homogeneous cultures of hepatic cells, and a cell-specific marker of toxicity of hepatic cells in heterogeneous cultures such as HLCs generated from various differentiation protocols and pluripotent stem cell lines, where conventional cytotoxicity assays using generic cellular markers may not be appropriate. We show that the sensitivity of the miR-122 cytotoxicity assay is similar to conventional assays that measure lactate dehydrogenase activity and intracellular adenosine triphosphate when applied in hepatic models with high levels of intracellular miR-122, and can be multiplexed with other assays. MiR-122 as a biomarker also has the potential to bridge results in in vitro experiments to in vivo animal models and human samples using the same assay, and to link findings from clinical studies in determining the relevance of in vitro models being developed for the study of drug-induced liver injury.

  • 4.
    Yildirimman, Reha
    et al.
    Max Planck Inst Mol Genet, Dept Vertebrate Genom, D-14195 Berlin, Germany .
    Brolén, Gabriella
    Cellartis AB, SE-41346 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Vilardell, Mireia
    Max Planck Inst Mol Genet, Dept Vertebrate Genom, D-14195 Berlin, Germany .
    Eriksson, Gustav
    Cellartis AB, SE-41346 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Synnergren, Jane
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Gmuender, Hans
    Genedata AG, CH-4053 Basel, Switzerland .
    Kamburov, Atanas
    Max Planck Inst Mol Genet, Dept Vertebrate Genom, D-14195 Berlin, Germany .
    Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Pharmacogenet Sect, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Castell, Jose
    Univ Valencia, Fac Med, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, E-46009 Valencia, Spain / Univ Hosp La Fe Valencia, Unit Expt Hepatol, E-46009 Valencia, Spain .
    Lahoz, Agustin
    Univ Hosp La Fe Valencia, Unit Expt Hepatol, E-46009 Valencia, Spain .
    Kleinjans, Jos
    Maastricht Univ, Dept Toxicogen, NL-6229 ER Maastricht, Netherlands.
    van Delft, Joost
    Maastricht Univ, Dept Toxicogen, NL-6229 ER Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Bjorquist, Petter
    Cellartis AB, SE-41346 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Herwig, Ralf
    Max Planck Inst Mol Genet, Dept Vertebrate Genom, D-14195 Berlin, Germany .
    Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells as a Tool for In Vitro Hazard Assessment of Chemical Carcinogenicity2011In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 124, no 2, p. 278-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatocyte-like cells derived from the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hES-Hep) have potential to provide a human relevant in vitro test system in which to evaluate the carcinogenic hazard of chemicals. In this study, we have investigated this potential using a panel of 15 chemicals classified as noncarcinogens, genotoxic carcinogens, and nongenotoxic carcinogens and measured whole-genome transcriptome responses with gene expression microarrays. We applied an ANOVA model that identified 592 genes highly discriminative for the panel of chemicals. Supervised classification with these genes achieved a cross-validation accuracy of > 95%. Moreover, the expression of the response genes in hES-Hep was strongly correlated with that in human primary hepatocytes cultured in vitro. In order to infer mechanistic information on the consequences of chemical exposure in hES-Hep, we developed a computational method that measures the responses of biochemical pathways to the panel of treatments and showed that these responses were discriminative for the three toxicity classes and linked to carcinogenesis through p53, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and apoptosis pathway modules. It could further be shown that the discrimination of toxicity classes was improved when analyzing the microarray data at the pathway level. In summary, our results demonstrate, for the first time, the potential of human embryonic stem cell--derived hepatic cells as an in vitro model for hazard assessment of chemical carcinogenesis, although it should be noted that more compounds are needed to test the robustness of the assay.

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