Högskolan i Skövde

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  • 1.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Novembre, Giovanni
    Division of Neurobiology, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Heléne
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Kämpe, Robin
    Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV) Linköping University Hospital, Sweden ; Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Paul, Elisabeth
    Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV) Linköping University Hospital, Sweden ; Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Morrison, India
    Division of Neurobiology, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden ; Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV) Linköping University Hospital, Sweden.
    Human endogenous oxytocin and its neural correlates show adaptive responses to social touch based on recent social context2023In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 12, article id e81197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both oxytocin (OT) and touch are key mediators of social attachment. In rodents, tactile stimulation elicits endogenous release of OT, potentially facilitating attachment and other forms of prosocial behavior, yet the relationship between endogenous OT and neural modulation remains unexplored in humans. Using serial sampling of plasma hormone levels during functional neuroimaging across two successive social interactions, we show that contextual circumstances of social touch facilitate or inhibit not only current hormonal and brain responses, but also calibrate later responses. Namely, touch from a male to his female romantic partner enhanced subsequent OT release for touch from an unfamiliar stranger, yet OT responses to partner touch were dampened following stranger touch. Hypothalamus and dorsal raphe activation reflected plasma OT changes during the initial interaction. In thesubsequent social interaction, time- and context-dependent OT changes modulated precuneus and parietal-temporal cortex pathways, including a region of medial prefrontal cortex that also covaried with plasma cortisol. These findings demonstrate that hormonal neuromodulation during successive human social interactions is adaptive to social context, and point to mechanisms that flexibly calibrate receptivity in social encounters.

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  • 2. NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC),
    Eiben, Gabriele (Contributor)
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Ezzati, Majid (Contributor)
    Imperial College London, United Kingdom ; University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.
    Filippi, Sarah (Contributor)
    Imperial College London, United Kingdom.
    Heterogeneous contributions of change in population distribution of body mass index to change in obesity and underweight2021In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 10, article id e60060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From 1985 to 2016, the prevalence of underweight decreased, and that of obesity and severe obesity increased, in most regions, with significant variation in the magnitude of these changes across regions. We investigated how much change in mean body mass index (BMI) explains changes in the prevalence of underweight, obesity, and severe obesity in different regions using data from 2896 population-based studies with 187 million participants. Changes in the prevalence of underweight and total obesity, and to a lesser extent severe obesity, are largely driven by shifts in the distribution of BMI, with smaller contributions from changes in the shape of the distribution. In East and Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, the underweight tail of the BMI distribution was left behind as the distribution shifted. There is a need for policies that address all forms of malnutrition by making healthy foods accessible and affordable, while restricting unhealthy foods through fiscal and regulatory restrictions.

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