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  • 1.
    Andersson Lassila, Andreas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Virtuell produkt- och produktionsutveckling.
    Svensson, Daniel
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Virtuell produkt- och produktionsutveckling.
    Wang, Wei
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Virtuell produkt- och produktionsutveckling.
    Andersson, Tobias
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Virtuell produkt- och produktionsutveckling.
    Numerical evaluation of cutting strategies for thin-walled parts2024Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikkel-id 1459Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Static form errors due to in-process deflections is a major concern in flank milling of thin-walled parts. To increase both productivity and part geometric accuracy, there is a need to predict and control these form errors. In this work, a modelling framework for prediction of the cutting force-induced form errors, or thickness errors, during flank milling of a thin-walled workpiece is proposed. The modelled workpiece geometry is continuously updated to account for material removal and the reduced stiffness matrix is calculated for nodes in the engagement zone. The proposed modelling framework is able to predict the resulting thickness errors for a thin-walled plate which is cut on both sides. Several cutting strategies and cut patterns using constant z-level finishing are studied. The modelling framework is used to investigate the effect of different cut patterns, machining allowance, cutting tools and cutting parameters on the resulting thickness errors. The framework is experimentally validated for various cutting sequences and cutting parameters. The predicted thickness errors closely correspond to the experimental results. It is shown from numerical evaluations that the selection of an appropriate cut pattern is crucial in order to reduce the thickness error. Furthermore, it is shown that an increased machining allowance gives a decreased thickness error for thin-walled plates.

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  • 2.
    Beheshtinia, Mohammad Ali
    et al.
    Industrial Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Semnan University, Iran.
    Bahrami, Fatemeh
    Industrial Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Semnan University, Iran.
    Fathi, Masood
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Virtuell produkt- och produktionsutveckling. Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Asadi, Shahla
    Department of Information Systems and Business Analytics, Kent State University, OH, USA.
    Evaluating and prioritizing the healthcare waste disposal center locations using a hybrid multi-criteria decision-making method2023Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikkel-id 15130Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare waste disposal center location (HCWDCL) impacts the environment and the health of living beings. Different and sometimes contradictory criteria in determining the appropriate site location for disposing of healthcare waste (HCW) complicate the decision-making process. This research presents a hybrid multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) method, named PROMSIS, to determine the appropriate HCWDCL in a real case. The PROMSIS is the combination of two well-known MCDM methods, namely TOPSIS and PROMETHEE. Moreover, fuzzy theory is used to describe the uncertainties of the problem parameters. To provide a reliable decision on selecting the best HCWDCL, a comprehensive list of criteria is identified through a literature review and experts’ opinions obtained from the case study. In total, 40 criteria are identified and classified into five major criteria, namely economic, environmental, social, technical, and geological. The weight of the considered criteria is determined by the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. Then, the score of the alternative HCWDCLs in each considered criterion is obtained. Finally, the candidate locations for disposing of HCWs are ranked by the proposed fuzzy PROMSIS method. The results show that the most important criteria in ranking the alternatives in the studied case are economic, environmental, and social, respectively. Moreover, the sub-criteria of operating cost, transportation cost, and pollution are identified as the most important sub-criteria, respectively.

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  • 3.
    Bermudo Gamboa, Carolina
    et al.
    Department of Civil, Material and Manufacturing Engineering, EII, University of Malaga, Spain.
    Andersson, Tobias J.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Virtuell produkt- och produktionsutveckling.
    Svensson, Daniel
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Virtuell produkt- och produktionsutveckling.
    Trujillo Vilches, Francisco Javier
    Department of Civil, Material and Manufacturing Engineering, EII, University of Malaga, Spain.
    Martín-Béjar, Sergio
    Department of Civil, Material and Manufacturing Engineering, EII, University of Malaga, Spain.
    Sevilla Hurtado, Lorenzo
    Department of Civil, Material and Manufacturing Engineering, EII, University of Malaga, Spain.
    Modeling of the fracture energy on the finite element simulation in Ti6Al4V alloy machining2021Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, nr 1, artikkel-id 18490Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main problems that exists when working with Finite Element Methods (FEM) applied to machining processes is the lack of adequate experimental data for simulating the material properties. Moreover, for damage models based on fracture energy, the correct selection of the energy value is critical for the chip formation process. It is usually difficult to obtain the fracture energy values and requires complex tests. In this work, an analysis of the influence of this fracture energy on the cutting force and the chip generation process has been carried out for different sets of cutting parameters. The aim is to present an empirical relationship, that allows selecting the fracture energy based on the cutting force and cutting parameters. The work is based on a FEM model of an orthogonal turning process for Ti6Al4V alloy using Abaqus/Explicit and the fracture energy empirical relation. This work shows that it is necessary to adjust the fracture energy for each combination of cutting conditions, to be able to fit the experimental results. The cutting force and the chip geometry are analyzed, showing how the developed model adapts to the experimental results. It shows that as the cutting speed and the feed increase, the fracture energy value that best adapts to the model decreases. The evolution shows a more pronounced decrease related to the feed increment and high cutting speed. 

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  • 4.
    Cruz, Maria Araceli Diaz
    et al.
    Research School of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, University of Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ulfenborg, Benjamin
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Systembiologi.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden ; Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden ; Unit of Cardiovascular Sciences, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Department of Biology and Biology Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, Borås University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Characterization of methylation patterns associated with lifestyle factors and vitamin D supplementation in a healthy elderly cohort from Southwest Sweden2022Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikkel-id 12670Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have shown that lifestyle factors, such as regular physical activity and vitamin D intake, may remarkably improve overall health and mental wellbeing. This is especially important in older adults whose vitamin D deficiency occurs with a high prevalence. This study aimed to examine the influence of lifestyle and vitamin D on global DNA methylation patterns in an elderly cohort in Southwest of Sweden. We also sought to examine the methylation levels of specific genes involved in vitamin D's molecular and metabolic activated pathways. We performed a genome wide methylation analysis, using Illumina Infinium DNA Methylation EPIC 850kBeadChip array, on 277 healthy individuals from Southwest Sweden at the age of 70-95. The study participants also answered queries on lifestyle, vitamin intake, heart medication, and estimated health. Vitamin D intake did not in general affect methylation patterns, which is in concert with other studies. However, when comparing the group of individuals taking vitamin supplements, including vitamin D, with those not taking supplements, a difference in methylation in the solute carrier family 25 (SCL25A24) gene was found. This confirms a previous finding, where changes in expression of SLC25A24 were associated with vitamin D treatment in human monocytes. The combination of vitamin D intake and high physical activity increased methylation of genes linked to regulation of vitamin D receptor pathway, the Wnt pathway and general cancer processes. To our knowledge, this is the first study detecting epigenetic markers associated with the combined effects of vitamin D supplementation and high physical activity. These results deserve to be further investigated in an extended, interventional study cohort, where also the levels of 25(OH)D3 can be monitored.

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  • 5.
    Fornes, Romina
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maliqueo, Manuel
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Endocrinology and Metabolism Laboratory, Department of Medicine, West Division, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Hu, Min
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hadi, Laila
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.
    Unidad Académica Multidisciplinaria Reynosa Aztlán, Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico.
    Ebefors, Kerstin
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyström, Jenny
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Labrie, Fernand
    Laval University Research Center in Molecular Endocrinology, Oncology and Human Genomics, CHUL Research Center, Quebec, Canada.
    Jansson, Thomas
    Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Sciences, University Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
    Benrick, Anna
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsspecialiseringen Hälsa och Lärande. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The effect of androgen excess on maternal metabolism, placental function and fetal growth in obese dams2017Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, artikkel-id 8066Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are often overweight or obese. To study the effects of maternal androgen excess in obese dams on metabolism, placental function and fetal growth, female C57Bl6J mice were fed a control (CD) or a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet for 4-10 weeks, and then mated. On gestational day (GD) 15.5-17.5, dams were injected with dihydrotestosterone (CD-DHT, HF/HS-DHT) or a vehicle (CD-Veh, HF/HS-Veh). HF/HS dams had higher fat content, both before mating and on GD18.5, with no difference in glucose homeostasis, whereas the insulin sensitivity was higher in DHT-exposed dams. Compared to the CD groups, the livers from HF/HS dams weighed more on GD18.5, the triglyceride content was higher, and there was a dysregulation of liver enzymes related to lipogenesis and higher mRNA expression of Fitm1. Fetuses from HF/HS-Veh dams had lower liver triglyceride content and mRNA expression of Srebf1c. Maternal DHT exposure, regardless of diet, decreased fetal liver Pparg mRNA expression and increased placental androgen receptor protein expression. Maternal diet-induced obesity, together with androgen excess, affects maternal and fetal liver function as demonstrated by increased triglyceride content and dysfunctional expression of enzymes and transcription factors involved in de novo lipogenesis and fat storage.

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  • 6.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Conditions for Eltonian Pyramids in Lotka-Volterra Food Chains2017Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, artikkel-id 10912Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In ecological communities consumers (excluding parasites and parasitoids) are in general larger and less numerous than their resource. This results in a well-known observation known as 'Eltonian pyramids' or the ` pyramid of numbers', and metabolic arguments suggest that this pattern is independent of the number of trophic levels in a system. At the same time, Lotka-Volterra (LV) consumer-resource models are a frequently used tool to study many questions in community ecology, but their capacity to produce Eltonian pyramids has not been formally analysed. Here, I address this knowledge gap by investigating if and when LV food chain models give rise to Eltonian pyramids. I show that Eltonian pyramids are difficult to reproduce without density-dependent mortality in the consumers, unless biologically plausible relationships between mortality rate and interaction strength are taken into account.

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  • 7.
    Jurcevic, Sanja
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Systembiologi.
    Keane, Simon
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön hälsa, hållbarhet och digitalisering.
    Borgmästars, Emmy
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences/Surgery, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lubovac-Pilav, Zelmina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Systembiologi.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön hälsa, hållbarhet och digitalisering. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap.
    Bioinformatics analysis of miRNAs in the neuroblastoma 11q-deleted region reveals a role of miR-548l in both 11q-deleted and MYCN amplified tumour cells2022Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikkel-id 19729Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood tumour that is responsible for approximately 15% of all childhood cancer deaths. Neuroblastoma tumours with amplification of the oncogene MYCN are aggressive, however, another aggressive subgroup without MYCN amplification also exists; rather, they have a deleted region at chromosome arm 11q. Twenty-six miRNAs are located within the breakpoint region of chromosome 11q and have been checked for a possible involvement in development of neuroblastoma due to the genomic alteration. Target genes of these miRNAs are involved in pathways associated with cancer, including proliferation, apoptosis and DNA repair. We could show that miR-548l found within the 11q region is downregulated in neuroblastoma cell lines with 11q deletion or MYCN amplification. In addition, we showed that the restoration of miR-548l level in a neuroblastoma cell line led to a decreased proliferation of these cells as well as a decrease in the percentage of cells in the S phase. We also found that miR-548l overexpression suppressed cell viability and promoted apoptosis, while miR-548l knockdown promoted cell viability and inhibited apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells. Our results indicate that 11q-deleted neuroblastoma and MYCN amplified neuroblastoma coalesce by downregulating miR-548l.

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  • 8.
    Kallio, Sakari
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku Institute for Advanced Studies and Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Koivisto, Mika
    Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku Institute for Advanced Studies and Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kaakinen, Johanna K.
    Turku Institute for Advanced Studies and Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Synaesthesia-type associations and perceptual changes induced by hypnotic suggestion2017Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, artikkel-id 17310Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Are synaesthetic experiences congenital and so hard-wired, or can a functional analogue be created? We induced an equivalent of form-colour synaesthesia using hypnotic suggestions in which symbols in an array (circles, crosses, squares) were suggested always to have a certain colour. In a Stroop type-naming task, three of the four highly hypnotizable participants showed a strong synaesthesia-type association between symbol and colour. This was verified both by their subjective reports and objective eye-movement behaviour. Two resembled a projector-and one an associator-type synaesthete. Participant interviews revealed that subjective experiences differed somewhat from typical (congenital) synaesthesia. Control participants who mimicked the task using cognitive strategies showed a very different response pattern. Overall, the results show that the targeted, preconsciously triggered associations and perceptual changes seen in association with congenital synaesthesia can rapidly be induced by hypnosis. They suggest that each participant's subjective experience of the task should be carefully evaluated, especially when studying hypnotic hallucinations. Studying such experiences can increase understanding of perception, automaticity, and awareness and open unique opportunities in cognitive neuroscience and consciousness research.

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  • 9.
    Karlsson, Ida K.
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology and Aging Research Network-Jönköping (ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden ; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gatz, Margaret
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Center for Economic and Social Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Arpawong, Thalida Em
    Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön hälsa, hållbarhet och digitalisering. Institute of Gerontology and Aging Research Network-Jönköping (ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden ; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, United States.
    The dynamic association between body mass index and cognition from midlife through late-life, and the effect of sex and genetic influences2021Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, nr 1Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Body mass index (BMI) is associated with cognitive abilities, but the nature of the relationship remains largely unexplored. We aimed to investigate the bidirectional relationship from midlife through late-life, while considering sex differences and genetic predisposition to higher BMI. We used data from 23,892 individuals of European ancestry from the Health and Retirement Study, with longitudinal data on BMI and three established cognitive indices: mental status, episodic memory, and their sum, called total cognition. To investigate the dynamic relationship between BMI and cognitive abilities, we applied dual change score models of change from age 50 through 89, with a breakpoint at age 65 or 70. Models were further stratified by sex and genetic predisposition to higher BMI using tertiles of a polygenic score for BMI (PGSBMI). We demonstrated bidirectional effects between BMI and all three cognitive indices, with higher BMI contributing to steeper decline in cognitive abilities in both midlife and late-life, and higher cognitive abilities contributing to less decline in BMI in late-life. The effects of BMI on change in cognitive abilities were more evident in men compared to women, and among those in the lowest tertile of the PGSBMI compared to those in the highest tertile, while the effects of cognition on BMI were similar across groups. In conclusion, these findings highlight a reciprocal relationship between BMI and cognitive abilities, indicating that the negative effects of a higher BMI persist from midlife through late-life, and that weight-loss in late-life may be driven by cognitive decline.

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  • 10.
    Kokosar, Milana
    et al.
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Benrick, Anna
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsspecialiseringen Hälsa och Lärande. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perfilyev, Alexander
    Epigenetics and Diabetes, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Scania University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Epigenetics and Diabetes, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Scania University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Källman, Thomas
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, NBIS - National Bioinformatics Infrastructure Sweden, SciLifeLab, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ling, Charlotte
    Epigenetics and Diabetes, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Scania University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 17177, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A Single Bout of Electroacupuncture Remodels Epigenetic and Transcriptional Changes in Adipose Tissue in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome2018Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, artikkel-id 1878Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A single bout of electroacupuncture results in muscle contractions and increased whole body glucose uptake in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with PCOS have transcriptional and epigenetic alterations in the adipose tissue and we hypothesized that electroacupuncture induces epigenetic and transcriptional changes to restore metabolic alterations. Twenty-one women with PCOS received a single bout of electroacupuncture, which increased the whole body glucose uptake. In subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies, we identified treatment-induced expression changes of 2369 genes (Q < 0.05) and DNA methylation changes of 7055 individual genes (Q = 0.11). The largest increase in expression was observed for FOSB (2405%), and the largest decrease for LOC100128899 (54%). The most enriched pathways included Acute phase response signaling and LXR/RXR activation. The DNA methylation changes ranged from 1-16%, and 407 methylation sites correlated with gene expression. Among genes known to be differentially expressed in PCOS, electroacupuncture reversed the expression of 80 genes, including PPAR gamma and ADIPOR2. Changes in the expression of Nr4 alpha 2 and Junb are reversed by adrenergic blockers in rats demonstrating that changes in gene expression, in part, is due to activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In conclusion, low-frequency electroacupuncture with muscle contractions remodels epigenetic and transcriptional changes that elicit metabolic improvement.

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  • 11.
    Kotta, Jonne
    et al.
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Vanhatalo, Jarno
    Department of Mathematics and Statistics and Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jänes, Holger
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia / Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Orav-Kotta, Helen
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Rugiu, Luca
    Department of Biology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Jormalainen, Veijo
    Department of Biology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Bobsien, Ivo
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Viitasalo, Markku
    Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Virtanen, Elina
    Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyström Sandman, Antonia
    AquaBiota Water Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Isaeus, Martin
    AquaBiota Water Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Systembiologi.
    Jonsson, Per R.
    Department of Marine Sciences – Tjärnö, University of Gothenburg, Tjärnö, Strömstad, Sweden.
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Department of Marine Sciences – Tjärnö, University of Gothenburg, Tjärnö, Strömstad, Sweden.
    Integrating experimental and distribution data to predict future species patterns2019Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, artikkel-id 1821Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Predictive species distribution models are mostly based on statistical dependence between environmental and distributional data and therefore may fail to account for physiological limits and biological interactions that are fundamental when modelling species distributions under future climate conditions. Here, we developed a state-of-the-art method integrating biological theory with survey and experimental data in a way that allows us to explicitly model both physical tolerance limits of species and inherent natural variability in regional conditions and thereby improve the reliability of species distribution predictions under future climate conditions. By using a macroalga-herbivore association (Fucus vesiculosus - Idotea balthica) as a case study, we illustrated how salinity reduction and temperature increase under future climate conditions may significantly reduce the occurrence and biomass of these important coastal species. Moreover, we showed that the reduction of herbivore occurrence is linked to reduction of their host macroalgae. Spatial predictive modelling and experimental biology have been traditionally seen as separate fields but stronger interlinkages between these disciplines can improve species distribution projections under climate change. Experiments enable qualitative prior knowledge to be defined and identify cause-effect relationships, and thereby better foresee alterations in ecosystem structure and functioning under future climate conditions that are not necessarily seen in projections based on non-causal statistical relationships alone.

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  • 12.
    Mauritsson, Karl
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Ecological and Environmental Modeling, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Systembiologi. Ecological and Environmental Modeling, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    A new flexible model for maintenance and feeding expenses that improves description of individual growth in insects2023Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikkel-id 16751Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic theories in ecology interpret ecological patterns at different levels through the lens of metabolism, typically applying allometric scaling to describe energy use. This requires a sound theory for individual metabolism. Common mechanistic growth models, such as ‘von Bertalanffy’, ‘dynamic energy budgets’ and the ‘ontogenetic growth model’ lack some potentially important aspects, especially regarding regulation of somatic maintenance. We develop a model for ontogenetic growth of animals, applicable to ad libitum and food limited conditions, based on an energy balance that expresses growth as the net result of assimilation and metabolic costs for maintenance, feeding and food processing. The most important contribution is the division of maintenance into a ‘non-negotiable’ and a ‘negotiable’ part, potentially resulting in hyperallometric scaling of maintenance and downregulated maintenance under food restriction. The model can also account for effects of body composition and type of growth at the cellular level. Common mechanistic growth models often fail to fully capture growth of insects. However, our model was able to capture empirical growth patterns observed in house crickets.

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  • 13.
    Nguyen, Duong T.
    et al.
    Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    O'Hara, Matthew
    Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Granéli, Cecilia
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Discovery Sciences, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Hicks, Ryan
    Discovery Sciences, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Miliotis, Tasso
    Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Nyström, Ann-Christin
    Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Hansson, Sara
    Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Davidsson, Pia
    Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Gan, Li-Ming
    Early Clinical and Development, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Magnone, Maria Chiara
    Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Althage, Magnus
    Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh
    Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Humanizing Miniature Hearts through 4-Flow Cannulation Perfusion Decellularization and Recellularization2018Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, artikkel-id 7458Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite improvements in pre-clinical drug testing models, predictability of clinical outcomes continues to be inadequate and costly due to poor evidence of drug metabolism. Humanized miniature organs integrating decellularized rodent organs with tissue specific cells are translational models that can provide further physiological understanding and evidence. Here, we evaluated 4-Flow cannulated rat hearts as the fundamental humanized organ model for cardiovascular drug validation. Results show clearance of cellular components in all chambers in 4-Flow hearts with efficient perfusion into both coronary arteries and cardiac veins. Furthermore, material characterization depicts preserved organization and content of important matrix proteins such as collagens, laminin, and elastin. With access to the complete vascular network, different human cell types were delivered to show spatial distribution and integration into the matrix under perfusion for up to three weeks. The feature of 4-Flow cannulation is the preservation of whole heart conformity enabling ventricular pacing via the pulmonary vein as demonstrated by noninvasive monitoring with fluid pressure and ultrasound imaging. Consequently, 4-Flow hearts surmounting organ mimicry challenges with intact complexity in vasculature and mechanical compliance of the whole organ providing an ideal platform for improving pre-clinical drug validation in addition to understanding cardiovascular diseases.

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  • 14.
    Noreika, Valdas
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom / Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Windt, Jennifer M.
    Department of Philosophy, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia.
    Kern, Markus
    Translational Neurotechnology Lab, University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Systembiologi. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Salonen, Tiina
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finlan.
    Parkkola, Riitta
    Department of Radiology, University and University Hospital of Turku, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön Systembiologi.
    Karim, Ahmed A.
    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Tübingen, Germany / Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany / Department of Health Psychology and Neurorehabilitation, SRH Mobile University, Riedlingen, Germany.
    Ball, Tonio
    Translational Neurotechnology Lab, University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Lenggenhager, Bigna
    Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Modulating dream experience: Noninvasive brain stimulation over the sensorimotor cortex reduces dream movement2020Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, nr 1, artikkel-id 6735Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, cortical correlates of specific dream contents have been reported, such as the activation of the sensorimotor cortex during dreamed hand clenching. Yet, despite a close resemblance of such activation patterns to those seen during the corresponding wakeful behaviour, the causal mechanisms underlying specific dream contents remain largely elusive. Here, we aimed to investigate the causal role of the sensorimotor cortex in generating movement and bodily sensations during REM sleep dreaming. Following bihemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) or sham stimulation, guided by functional mapping of the primary motor cortex, naive participants were awakened from REM sleep and responded to a questionnaire on bodily sensations in dreams. Electromyographic (EMG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were used to quantify physiological changes during the preceding REM period. We found that tDCS, compared to sham stimulation, significantly decreased reports of dream movement, especially of repetitive actions. Other types of bodily experiences, such as tactile or vestibular sensations, were not affected by tDCS, confirming the specificity of stimulation effects to movement sensations. In addition, tDCS reduced EEG interhemispheric coherence in parietal areas and affected the phasic EMG correlation between both arms. These findings show that a complex temporal reorganization of the motor network co-occurred with the reduction of dream movement, revealing a link between central and peripheral motor processes and movement sensations of the dream self. tDCS over the sensorimotor cortex interferes with dream movement during REM sleep, which is consistent with a causal contribution to dream experience and has broader implications for understanding the neural basis of self-experience in dreams. © 2020, The Author(s).

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  • 15.
    Nyberg, Lena K.
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Quaderi, Saair
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Emilsson, Gustav
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karami, Nahid
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lagerstedt, Erik
    Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Müller, Vilhelm
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Noble, Charleston
    Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammarberg, Susanna
    Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Adam N.
    Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Fei
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fritzsche, Joachim
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kristiansson, Erik
    Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandegren, Linus
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ambjörnsson, Tobias
    Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Fredrik
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules2016Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, artikkel-id 30410Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance - currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO - is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics.

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  • 16.
    Roubinet, Eve
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malsher, Gerard
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Staudacher, Karin
    Mountain Agriculture Research Unit, Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Traugott, Michael
    Mountain Agriculture Research Unit, Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Ekbom, Barbara
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Mattias
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    High Redundancy as well as Complementary Prey Choice Characterize Generalist Predator Food Webs in Agroecosystems2018Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, artikkel-id 8054Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Food web structure influences ecosystem functioning and the strength and stability of associated ecosystem services. With their broad diet, generalist predators represent key nodes in the structure of many food webs and they contribute substantially to ecosystem services such as biological pest control. However, until recently it has been difficult to empirically assess food web structure with generalist predators. We utilized DNA-based molecular gut-content analyses to assess the prey use of a set of generalist invertebrate predator species common in temperate agricultural fields. We investigated the degree of specialization of predator-prey food webs at two key stages of the cropping season and analysed the link temperature of different trophic links, to identify non-random predation. We found a low level of specialization in our food webs, and identified warm and cool links which may result from active prey choice or avoidance. We also found a within-season variation in interaction strength between predators and aphid pests which differed among predator species. Our results show a high time-specific functional redundancy of the predator community, but also suggest temporally complementary prey choice due to within-season succession of some predator species.

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  • 17.
    Samad, Manisha
    et al.
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ek, Joakim
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Börchers, Stina
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krieger, Jean-Philippe
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Institute of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zürich-VetSuisse, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skibicka, Karolina P.
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, United States ; Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, United States.
    Asterholm, Ingrid Wernstedt
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Benrick, Anna
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön hälsa, hållbarhet och digitalisering. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Elevated circulating adiponectin levels do not prevent anxiety-like behavior in a PCOS-like mouse model2024Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikkel-id 563Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with symptoms of moderate to severe anxiety and depression. Hyperandrogenism is a key feature together with lower levels of the adipocyte hormone adiponectin. Androgen exposure leads to anxiety-like behavior in female offspring while adiponectin is reported to be anxiolytic. Here we test the hypothesis that elevated adiponectin levels protect against the development of androgen-induced anxiety-like behavior. Pregnant mice overexpressing adiponectin (APNtg) and wildtypes were injected with vehicle or dihydrotestosterone to induce prenatal androgenization (PNA) in the offspring. Metabolic profiling and behavioral tests were performed in 4-month-old female offspring. PNA offspring spent more time in the closed arms of the elevated plus maze, indicating anxiety-like behavior. Intriguingly, neither maternal nor offspring adiponectin overexpression prevented an anxiety-like behavior in PNA-exposed offspring. However, adiponectin overexpression in dams had metabolic imprinting effects, shown as lower fat mass and glucose levels in their offspring. While serum adiponectin levels were elevated in APNtg mice, cerebrospinal fluid levels were similar between genotypes. Adiponectin overexpression improved metabolic functions but did not elicit anxiolytic effects in PNA-exposed offspring. These observations might be attributed to increased circulating but unchanged cerebrospinal fluid adiponectin levels in APNtg mice. Thus, increased adiponectin levels in the brain are likely needed to stimulate anxiolytic effects. 

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  • 18.
    Samrani, George
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute / Stockholm University.
    Marklund, Petter
    Stockholm University.
    Engström, Lisa
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Broman, Daniel
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Dalarna University.
    Persson, Jonas
    Karolinska Institute / Stockholm University.
    Behavioral facilitation and increased brain responses from a high interference working memory context2018Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, nr 1, artikkel-id 15308Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Many real-life situations require flexible behavior in changing environments. Evidence suggests that anticipation of conflict or task difficulty results in behavioral and neural allocation of task-relevant resources. Here we used a high- and low-interference version of an item-recognition task to examine the neurobehavioral underpinnings of context-sensitive adjustment in working memory (WM). We hypothesized that task environments that included high-interference trials would require participants to allocate neurocognitive resources to adjust to the more demanding task context. The results of two independent behavioral experiments showed enhanced WM performance in the high-interference context, which indicated that a high-interference context improves performance on non-interference trials. A third behavioral experiment showed that when WM load was increased, this effect was no longer significant. Neuroimaging results further showed greater engagement of inferior frontal gyrus, striatum, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and midbrain in participants performing the task in the high- than in the low-interference context. This effect could arise from an active or dormant mode of anticipation that seems to engage fronto-striatal and midbrain regions to flexibly adjust resources to task demands. Our results extend the model of conflict adaptation beyond trial-to-trial adjustments by showing that a high interference context affects both behavioral and biological aspects of cognition.

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  • 19.
    Sandman, Nils
    et al.
    Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland / Genomics and Biomarkers Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Kronholm, Erkki
    Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland.
    Vartiainen, Erkki
    Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Laatikainen, Tiina
    Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland / Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland / Hospital District of North Karelia, Finland.
    Paunio, Tiina
    Genomics and Biomarkers Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland / Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
    Nightmares as predictors of suicide: an extension study including war veterans2017Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, artikkel-id 44756Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Nightmares are intensive dreams with negative emotional tone. Frequent nightmares can pose a serious clinical problem and in 2001, Tanskanen et al. found that nightmares increase the risk of suicide. However, the dataset used by these authors included war veterans in whom nightmare frequency -and possibly also suicide risk -is elevated. Therefore, re-examination of the association between nightmares and suicide in these data is warranted. We investigated the relationship between nightmares and suicide both in the general population and war veterans in Finnish National FINRISK Study from the years 1972 to 2012, a dataset overlapping with the one used in the study by Tanskanen et al. Our data comprise 71,068 participants of whom 3139 are war veterans. Participants were followed from their survey participation until the end of 2014 or death. Suicides (N = 398) were identified from the National Causes of Death Register. Frequent nightmares increase the risk of suicide: The result of Tanskanen et al. holds even when war experiences are controlled for. Actually nightmares are not significantly associated with suicides among war veterans. These results support the role of nightmares as an independent risk factor for suicide instead of just being proxy for history of traumatic experiences.

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  • 20.
    Sikka, Pilleriin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Pesonen, Henri
    Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Department of Computer Science, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Finland.
    Peace of mind and anxiety in the waking state are related to the affective content of dreams2018Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, artikkel-id 12762Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Waking mental well-being is assumed to be tightly linked to sleep and the affective content of dreams. However, empirical research is scant and has mostly focused on ill-being by studying the dreams of people with psychopathology. We explored the relationship between waking well-being and dream affect by measuring not only symptoms of ill-being but also different types and components of well-being. Importantly, this is the first time peace of mind was investigated as a distinct aspect of well-being in a Western sample and in relation to dream content. Healthy participants completed a well-being questionnaire, followed by a three-week daily dream diary and ratings of dream affect. Multilevel analyses showed that peace of mind was related to positive dream affect, whereas symptoms of anxiety were related to negative dream affect. Moreover, waking measures were better related to affect expressed in dream reports rather than participants’ self-ratings of dream affect. We propose that whereas anxiety may reflect affect dysregulation in waking and dreaming, peace of mind reflects enhanced affect regulation in both states of consciousness. Therefore, dream reports may possibly serve as markers of mental health. Finally, our study shows that peace of mind complements existing conceptualizations and measures of well-being.

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  • 21.
    Silventoinen, Karri
    et al.
    Department of Social Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland ; Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Jelenkovic, Aline
    Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Nursing, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Spain ; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Sund, Reijo
    Department of Social Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland ; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Latvala, Antti
    Department of Social Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Honda, Chika
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Inui, Fujio
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan ; Faculty of Health Science, Kio University, Nara, Japan.
    Tomizawa, Rie
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Watanabe, Mikio
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Sakai, Norio
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Rebato, Esther
    Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Leioa, Spain.
    Busjahn, Andreas
    HealthTwiSt GmbH, Berlin, Germany.
    Tyler, Jessica
    Twins Research Australia, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Hopper, John L.
    Twins Research Australia, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia ; Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Korea.
    Ordoñana, Juan R.
    Department of Human Anatomy and Psychobiology, University of Murcia, Spain ; IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
    Sánchez-Romera, Juan F.
    Department of Human Anatomy and Psychobiology, University of Murcia, Spain ; IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
    Colodro-Conde, Lucia
    Department of Human Anatomy and Psychobiology, University of Murcia, Spain ; Genetic Epidemiology Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
    Calais-Ferreira, Lucas
    Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Oliveira, Vinicius C.
    Pós‑Graduação em Reabilitação e Desempenho Funcional, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina, Brazil.
    Ferreira, Paulo H.
    Musculoskeletal Health Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Australia.
    Medda, Emanuela
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità - Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health, Rome, Italy.
    Nisticò, Lorenza
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità - Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health, Rome, Italy.
    Toccaceli, Virgilia
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità - Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health, Rome, Italy.
    Derom, Catherine A.
    Centre of Human Genetics, University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium ; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ghent University Hospitals, Belgium.
    Vlietinck, Robert F.
    Centre of Human Genetics, University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, The Mindich Child Health and Development Institute, Icahn School of Medicine At Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
    Siribaddana, Sisira H.
    Institute of Research and Development, Battaramulla, Sri Lanka ; Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka Saliyapura, Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka.
    Hotopf, Matthew
    Institute of Psychiatry Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, UK ; South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
    Sumathipala, Athula
    Institute of Research and Development, Battaramulla, Sri Lanka ; Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, School for Primary Care Research (SPCR), Faculty of Health, Keele University, Stafordshire, UK.
    Rijsdijk, Fruhling
    Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, UK.
    Duncan, Glen E.
    Washington State Twin Registry, Washington State University - Health Sciences Spokane, Spokane, WA, USA.
    Buchwald, Dedra
    Washington State Twin Registry, Washington State University - Health Sciences Spokane, Spokane, WA, USA.
    Tynelius, Per
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tan, Qihua
    Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Biodemography, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Zhang, Dongfeng
    Department of Public Health, Qingdao University Medical College, Qingdao, China.
    Pang, Zengchang
    Department of Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention, Qingdao Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Qingdao, China.
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Institute of Gerontology and Aging Research Network – Jönköping (ARN‑J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hwang, Amie E.
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA ; USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Mack, Thomas M.
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA ; USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Krueger, Robert F.
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    McGue, Matt
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    Pahlen, Shandell
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA.
    Brandt, Ingunn
    Division of Health Data and Digitalization, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Nilsen, Thomas S.
    Division of Health Data and Digitalization, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Harris, Jennifer R.
    Division of Health Data and Digitalization, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    Genetic Epidemiology Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
    Medland, Sarah E.
    Genetic Epidemiology Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Department of Biological Psychology, Netherlands Twin Register, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bartels, Meike
    Department of Biological Psychology, Netherlands Twin Register, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E. M.
    Department of Biological Psychology, Netherlands Twin Register, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Franz, Carol E.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
    Kremen, William S.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA ; VA San Diego Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Lyons, Michael J.
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, MA, USA.
    Silberg, Judy L.
    Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
    Maes, Hermine H.
    Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Psychiatry and Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
    Kandler, Christian
    Department of Psychology, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Nelson, Tracy L.
    Department of Health and Exercise Sciences and Colorado School of Public Health, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, USA.
    Whitfield, Keith E.
    Psychology Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA.
    Corley, Robin P.
    Institute for Behavioral Genetics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA.
    Huibregtse, Brooke M.
    Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA.
    Gatz, Margaret
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Center for Economic and Social Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Butler, David A.
    Health and Medicine Division, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington, DC, USA.
    Tarnoki, Adam D.
    Medical Imaging Centre, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary ; Hungarian Twin Registry, Budapest, Hungary.
    Tarnoki, David L.
    Medical Imaging Centre, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary ; Hungarian Twin Registry, Budapest, Hungary.
    Park, Hang A.
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Korea ; Department of Emergency Medicine, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hwaseong, Korea.
    Lee, Jooyeon
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Korea.
    Lee, Soo Ji
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Korea ; Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Sung, Joohon
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Korea ; Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Yokoyama, Yoshie
    Department of Public Health Nursing, Osaka City University, Japan.
    Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.
    Novo Nordisk Foundation Centre for Basic Metabolic Research (Section of Metabolic Genetics), Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark ; Department of Public Health (Section of Epidemiology), Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Department of Biological Psychology, Netherlands Twin Register, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland ; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Genetic and environmental variation in educational attainment: an individual-based analysis of 28 twin cohorts2020Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, nr 1, artikkel-id 12681Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the heritability of educational attainment and how it differed between birth cohorts and cultural–geographic regions. A classical twin design was applied to pooled data from 28 cohorts representing 16 countries and including 193,518 twins with information on educational attainment at 25 years of age or older. Genetic factors explained the major part of individual differences in educational attainment (heritability: a2 = 0.43; 0.41–0.44), but also environmental variation shared by co-twins was substantial (c2 = 0.31; 0.30–0.33). The proportions of educational variation explained by genetic and shared environmental factors did not differ between Europe, North America and Australia, and East Asia. When restricted to twins 30 years or older to confirm finalized education, the heritability was higher in the older cohorts born in 1900–1949 (a2 = 0.44; 0.41–0.46) than in the later cohorts born in 1950–1989 (a2 = 0.38; 0.36–0.40), with a corresponding lower influence of common environmental factors (c2 = 0.31; 0.29–0.33 and c2 = 0.34; 0.32–0.36, respectively). In conclusion, both genetic and environmental factors shared by co-twins have an important influence on individual differences in educational attainment. The effect of genetic factors on educational attainment has decreased from the cohorts born before to those born after the 1950s.

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  • 22.
    Silventoinen, Karri
    et al.
    Department of Social Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland ; Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Piirtola, Maarit
    UKK Institute – Centre for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland ; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Jelenkovic, Aline
    Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Nursing, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Spain ; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Sund, Reijo
    Department of Social Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland ; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Tarnoki, Adam D.
    Medical Imaging Centre, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary ; Hungarian Twin Registry, Budapest, Hungary.
    Tarnoki, David L.
    Medical Imaging Centre, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary ; Hungarian Twin Registry, Budapest, Hungary.
    Medda, Emanuela
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità - Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health, Rome, Italy.
    Nisticò, Lorenza
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità - Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health, Rome, Italy.
    Toccaceli, Virgilia
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità - Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health, Rome, Italy.
    Honda, Chika
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan ; School of Nursing, Shiga University of Medical Science, Osaka, Japan.
    Inui, Fujio
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan ; Faculty of Health Science, Kio University, Nara, Japan.
    Tomizawa, Rie
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Watanabe, Mikio
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Sakai, Norio
    Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Gatz, Margaret
    Center for Economic and Social Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA ; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Butler, David A.
    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington, DC, USA.
    Lee, Jooyeon
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Lee, Soo Ji
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea ; Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Sung, Joohon
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea ; Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Franz, Carol E.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
    Kremen, William S.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA ; VA San Diego Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Lyons, Michael J.
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
    Derom, Catherine A.
    Centre of Human Genetics, University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium ; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ghent University Hospitals, Belgium.
    Vlietinck, Robert F.
    Centre of Human Genetics, University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, The Mindich Child Health and Development Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
    Tynelius, Per
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    Genetic Epidemiology Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
    Medland, Sarah E.
    Genetic Epidemiology Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Brandt, Ingunn
    Division of Health Data and Digitalization, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Nilsen, Thomas S.
    Division of Health Data and Digitalization, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Harris, Jennifer R.
    Center for Fertility and Health, The Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Tyler, Jessica
    Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Twins Research Australia, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Hopper, John L.
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea ; Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Twins Research Australia, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön hälsa, hållbarhet och digitalisering. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ordoñana, Juan R.
    Department of Human Anatomy and Psychobiology, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain ; IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
    Sánchez-Romera, Juan F.
    Department of Human Anatomy and Psychobiology, University of Murcia, Spain ; IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
    Colodro-Conde, Lucia
    Genetic Epidemiology Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia ; Department of Human Anatomy and Psychobiology, University of Murcia, Spain.
    Rebato, Esther
    Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Leioa, Spain.
    Zhang, Dongfeng
    Department of Public Health, Qingdao University Medical College, Qingdao, China.
    Pang, Zengchang
    Department of Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention, Qingdao Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Qingdao, China.
    Tan, Qihua
    Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Biodemography, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Silberg, Judy L.
    Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
    Maes, Hermine H.
    Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Psychiatry and Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Netherlands Twin Register, Department of Biological Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.
    Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Novo Nordisk Foundation Centre for Basic Metabolic Research, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark ; Department of Public Health (Section of Epidemiology), Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Korhonen, Tellervo
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Smoking remains associated with education after controlling for social background and genetic factors in a study of 18 twin cohorts2022Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, nr 1, artikkel-id 13148Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested the causality between education and smoking using the natural experiment of discordant twin pairs allowing to optimally control for background genetic and childhood social factors. Data from 18 cohorts including 10,527 monozygotic (MZ) and same-sex dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs discordant for education and smoking were analyzed by linear fixed effects regression models. Within twin pairs, education levels were lower among the currently smoking than among the never smoking co-twins and this education difference was larger within DZ than MZ pairs. Similarly, education levels were higher among former smoking than among currently smoking co-twins, and this difference was larger within DZ pairs. Our results support the hypothesis of a causal effect of education on both current smoking status and smoking cessation. However, the even greater intra-pair differences within DZ pairs, who share only 50% of their segregating genes, provide evidence that shared genetic factors also contribute to these associations.

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  • 23.
    Sina, Elida
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Buck, Christoph
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Institute of Statistics, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Coumans, Juul M. J.
    Teaching and Learning Centre, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, Netherlands.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön hälsa, hållbarhet och digitalisering.
    Formisano, Annarita
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Lissner, Lauren
    School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mazur, Artur
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Rzeszów, Poland.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Molnar, Dénes
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de La Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Department of Epidemiology and Data Science, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale Dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany ; Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    I. Family consortium,
    Digital media exposure and cognitive functioning in European children and adolescents of the I.Family study2023Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikkel-id 18855Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The digital environment can pose health risks through exposure to unhealthy content. Yet, little is known about its relation to children’s cognitive functioning. This study investigates the association between digital media (DM) exposure and children’s cognitive functioning. This cross-sectional study is based on examinations of children aged 8–18 years (N = 8673) of the I.Family cohort (2013–2014). Exposure to television, computer, smartphone and internet was self-reported (hours/day). Media multitasking (MMT) was defined as simultaneous use of computers with other digital or non-screen-based activities. Standard instruments were used to assess cognitive inflexibility (score: 0–39), decision-making ability (− 100 to + 100) and impulsivity (12–48). Adjusted regression coefficients and 99.9%CIs were calculated by generalized linear mixed-effects models. In total, 3261 participants provided data for impulsivity, 3441 for cognitive inflexibility and 4046 for decision-making. Exposure to smartphones and media multitasking were positively associated with impulsivity (βsmartphone = 0.74; 99.9%CI = 0.42–1.07; βMMT = 0.73; 99.9%CI = 0.35–1.12) and cognitive inflexibility (βsmartphone = 0.32; 99.9%CI = -0.02–0.66; βMMT = 0.39; 99.9%CI = 0.01–0.77) while being inversely associated with decision-making ability. Extensive smartphone/internet exposure combined with low computer/medium TV exposure was associated with higher impulsivity and cognitive inflexibility scores, especially in girls. DM exposure is adversely associated with cognitive functioning in children and adolescents. Children require protection against the likely adverse impact of digital environment. 

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  • 24.
    Singh, Neha
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Biotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
    Hussain, Showket
    Division of Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cytology and Preventive Oncology (ICMR), NOIDA, India.
    Kakkar, Nandita
    Department of Histopathology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.
    Singh, Shrawan K.
    Department of Urology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.
    Sobti, Ranbir C.
    Department of Biotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
    Bharadwaj, Mausumi
    Division of Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cytology and Preventive Oncology (ICMR), NOIDA, India.
    Implication of high risk Human papillomavirus HR-HPV infection in prostate cancer in Indian population- A pioneering case-control analysis2015Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, artikkel-id 7822Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer with sexual history as a consistent risk factor. This is the pioneering study that evaluates the frequency of HPV infection in prostate cancer in India. Ninety five (95) histopathologically confirmed cancer and fifty five (55) BPH from Indian population were analyzed for HPV infection using a pair of consensus sequence primer followed by type specific PCRs for both high-risk and low-risk HPV types. The data demonstrate HPV infection in 41% of prostate tumor biopsies and 20% in BPH. Subsequent PCR- based HPV typing using type - specific primers revealed 32% were infected with HPV type 16 whereas 6% were found to be positive for HPV type 18, while in BPH controls only 5% of the BPH controls were infected with HPV 16 and this difference was highly significant (p = 0.0004). Significant proportion of HPV infected (74%) cases belonged to stage III and IV (p < 0.001) with a high Gleason score ≥8 (p = 0.003). The study represents for the first time the incidence of HPV infection in prostate cancer in Indian population and strengthens the hypothesis that HPV infection could be one of the co factor associated with progression of prostate cancer.

  • 25.
    Szekeres, Ferenc L. M.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön hälsa, hållbarhet och digitalisering. Division of Genetic Physiology, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Walum, Erik
    Glucox Biotech AB, Färentuna, Sweden.
    Wikström, Per
    Glucox Biotech AB, Färentuna, Sweden.
    Arner, Anders
    Division of Genetic Physiology, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockhom, Sweden ; Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Thoracic Surgery, Lund University, c/o Igelösa Life Science AB, Lund, Sweden.
    A small molecule inhibitor of Nox2 and Nox4 improves contractile function after ischemia–reperfusion in the mouse heart2021Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, nr 1, artikkel-id 11970Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The NADPH oxidase enzymes Nox2 and 4, are important generators of Reactive oxygen species (ROS). These enzymes are abundantly expressed in cardiomyocytes and have been implicated in ischemia–reperfusion injury. Previous attempts with full inhibition of their activity using genetically modified animals have shown variable results, suggesting that a selective and graded inhibition could be a more relevant approach. We have, using chemical library screening, identified a new compound (GLX481304) which inhibits Nox 2 and 4 (with IC50 values of 1.25 µM) without general antioxidant effects or inhibitory effects on Nox 1. The compound inhibits ROS production in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes and improves cardiomyocyte contractility and contraction of whole retrogradely (Langendorff) perfused hearts after a global ischemia period. We conclude that a pharmacological and partial inhibition of ROS production by inhibition of Nox 2 and 4 is beneficial for recovery after ischemia reperfusion and might be a promising venue for treatment of ischemic injury to the heart. 

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    fulltext
  • 26.
    Säterberg, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Theoretical Biology, Sweden / Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Yearsley, Jon
    University College Dublin, School of Biology & Environmental Science, Ireland / UCD Earth Institute, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.
    Berg, Sofia
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Ebenman, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Theoretical Biology, Sweden / Stockholm University, SRC, Sweden.
    A potential role for rare species in ecosystem dynamics2019Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, s. 1-12, artikkel-id 11107Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The ecological importance of common species for many ecosystem processes and functions is unquestionably due to their high a bundance.Yet, the importance of rare species is much less understood. Here we take a theoretical approach, exposing dynamical models of ecological networks to small perturbations, to explore the dynamical importance of rare and common species. We find that both species types contribute to the recovery of communities following generic perturbations (i.e. perturbations affecting all species).Yet, when perturbations are selective (i.e. affects only one species), perturbations to rare species have the most pronounced effect on community stability. We show that this is due to the strong indirect effects induced by perturbations to rare species. Because indirect effects typically set in at longer timescales, our results indicate that the importance of rare species may be easily overlooked and thus underrated. Hence, our study provides a potential ecological motive for the management and protection of rare species.

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