his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Applying Heidegger's interpretive phenomenology to women's miscarriage experience2010In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, ISSN 1179-1578, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 2010, no 3, p. 75-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much has been written about measuring the feelings and impressions of women regarding their experience of miscarriage. According to the existential philosopher Heidegger life experiences such as the experience of a woman having a miscarriage can be interpreted and explained only in the context of the totality of the women’s experiences in the past, the present, and the future. Thirteen in-depth interviews with women about their experiences of miscarriage were interpreted with respect to Heidegger’s “Being and Time”. By using his inter-pretive phenomenology the essence of the miscarriage experience was explored and defined. The women’s feelings and impressions were influenced by past experiences of miscarriage, pregnancy, and births. Present conditions in the women’s lives contributing to the experience include their relationships, working situation, and living conditions. Each woman’s future prospects and hopes have been structurally altered with regard to their aspirations for their terminated pregnancy. The impact of miscarriage in a woman’s life was found to be more important than caregiver providers and society have previously attributed to in terms of scale. The results of the interviews reveal that the women believed that only women who had experienced their own miscarriages were able to fully understand this complex womanly experience and its effects on the woman who had miscarried.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Meta-analysis to obtain a scale of psychological reaction after perinatal loss: focus on miscarriage2011In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, ISSN 1179-1578, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 4, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pregnancy has different meanings to different women depending upon their circumstances. A number of qualitative studies have described the experience of miscarriage by women who had desired to carry their pregnancy to full term. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify a scale of psychological reaction to miscarriage. Meta-analysis is a quantitative approach for reviewing articles from scientific journals through statistical analysis of findings from individual studies. In this review, a meta-analytic method was used to identify and analyze psychological reactions in women who have suffered a miscarriage. Different reactions to stress associated with the period following miscarriage were identified. The depression reaction had the highest average, weighted, unbiased estimate of effect (d+= 0.99) and was frequently associated with the experience of perinatal loss. Psychiatric morbidity was found after miscarriage in 27% of cases by a diagnostic interview ten days after miscarriage. The grief reaction had a medium d+ of 0.56 in the studies included. However, grief after miscarriage differed from other types of grief after perinatal loss because the parents had no focus for their grief. The guilt is greater after miscarriage than after other types of perinatal loss. Measurement of the stress reaction and anxiety reaction seems to be difficult in the included studies, as evidenced by a low d+ (0.17 and 0.16, respectively). It has been recommended that grief after perinatal loss be measured by an adapted instrument called the Perinatal Grief Scale Short Version.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Women's well-being improves after missed miscarriage with more active support and application of Swanson's Caring Theory2011In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, ISSN 1179-1578, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 4, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to provide better organization and more efficient use of resources within the health care system in order to identify women with nonviable pregnancy earlier in their gestation terms and also to identify those women who experience severe grief reaction after the miscarriage. The proposed solution is to offer an appointment with a gynecologist during regular office hours after consultation with the patient’s midwife to women experiencing symptoms and who are concerned with the viability of their pregnancy. Unnecessary contact with the emergency room by the patients would be reduced as a result of this improvement in organization. The aim of the study was to give the women experiencing missed miscarriage an increased sense of well-being by applying Swanson’s Caring Theory to their recovery, in addition to the better organization and more efficient use of resources.

    Method: Both the original study from 2002 to 2003 and the later study from 2004 to 2005 applied Swanson’s Caring Theory in the follow-up care management of the women, but only the later study was influenced by the changes made in the health care system. In the past, diagnosis of missed miscarriage was delayed because women experiencing minor symptoms were not highly prioritized in the health care system. More active support was introduced in order to get the proper information to the patient throughout the health care system. The size of the original study database was n=43, compared with the later study database, which was n=56. All of the women answered the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS) questions twice, 1 month and 4 months after their diagnosis. Some additional questions about their circumstances unrelated to the PGS were also mailed to the women 4 months after their diagnosis.

    Results: As a result of the more active support, women felt that they received professional care when they needed it most. The patients were satisfied that they were treated as if they were suffering from normal grief. The group score above the limits for deep grief 4 months after diagnosis was significantly lowered. The chances of receiving their diagnosis at an appointment during office hours increased (odds ratio 3.38). Sick leave time of more than a week was reduced from 44% in the original study to 22% in the later study.

  • 4.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Jansson, Malin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Prototype for Internet support of pregnant women and mothers with type I diabetes: focus group testing2012In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, ISSN 1179-1578, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 5, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to pilot test a prototype website called MODIAB-web designed to support pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes.

    Method: A focus group was undertaken and the results were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Eight subthemes were identified, comprising "blood glucose versus insulin," "application for smart phones," "the time aspect," "interface and technology," "forum," "direct link to the diabetes midwife," "ask the expert," and "lack of contact information." These subthemes were condensed into two main themes. The first theme was "easily understood interface, but in need of a more blood-glucose focused orientation" and the second theme was "forum for interaction with both equals and experts."

    Conclusion: The women in this study had positive impressions of several of the MODIAB-web functions, including a forum for pregnant mothers with type 1 diabetes and the possibility of being able to put their blood glucose levels into a diagram which could be sent directly to the diabetes midwife. Access to articles and information via the "fact" tab and the ability to ask questions of experts were also significantly helpful to women in the focus group. Pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes can gain support from such a Web-based self-help system.

  • 5.
    Dahlén, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Experience of being a low priority patient during waiting time at an emergency department2012In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, ISSN 1179-1578, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 5, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Work in the emergency department is characterized by fast and efficient medical efforts to save lives, but can also involve a long waiting time for patients. Patients are given a priority rating upon their arrival in the clinic based on the seriousness of their problem, and nursing care for lower priority patients is given a lower prioritization. Regardless of their medical prioritization, all patients have a right to expect good nursing care while they are waiting. The purpose of this study was to illustrate the experience of the low prioritized patient during their waiting time in the emergency department. Methods: A phenomenological hermeneutic research method was used to analyze an interview transcript. Data collection consisted of narrative interviews. The interviewees were 14 patients who had waited more than three hours for surgical, orthopedic, or other medical care.Results: The findings resulted in four different themes, ie, being dependent on care, being exposed, being vulnerable, and being secure. Lower priority patients are not paid as much attention by nursing staff. Patients reported feeling powerless, insulted, and humiliated when their care was delayed without their understanding what was happening to them. Not understanding results in exposure that violates self-esteem. Conclusion: The goal of the health care provider must be to minimize and prevent suffering, prevent feelings of vulnerability, and to create conditions for optimal patient well being.

  • 6.
    Norling - Gustafsson, Ann
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Skaghammar, Katarina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Expectant parents’ experiences of parental education within the antenatal health service2011In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, ISSN 1179-1578, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 4, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being an expectant parent is a life changing event and it is something that most people will experience in their lifetime. Many people who are parents for the first time will participate in parenting education. Most of the previous studies associated with parenting education focus on subjects such as birth outcome and breastfeeding. The purpose of this study is to focus on the less investigated aspect of the parents’ experience of participating in parenting education with Maternal Healthcare Services (MVC). A qualitative, phenomenological, hermeneutical method was selected to be used to analyze our findings and we used the statements of twenty participants to accumulate enough material to develop it into twelve sub-themes and five themes. The results of this study show that these expectant parents had few or no expectations of the parenting education that they were going to participate in. Generally speaking the parents seemed to be satisfied with the program. They described their reasons for participating as a chance to get together with other people in similar circumstances and to share information and they found a midwife to be a trustworthy professional person to confirm the information that was available to them from other sources.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf