his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 35 of 35
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abdul-Hussein, Saba
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rahl, Karin
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moslemi, Ali-Reza
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Clinical and Medical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Phenotypes of myopathy-related beta-tropomyosin mutants in human and mouse tissue cultures2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9, article id e72396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in TPM2 result in a variety of myopathies characterised by variable clinical and morphological features. We used human and mouse cultured cells to study the effects of β-TM mutants. The mutants induced a range of phenotypes in human myoblasts, which generally changed upon differentiation to myotubes. Human myotubes transfected with the E41K-β-TM(EGFP) mutant showed perinuclear aggregates. The G53ins-β-TM(EGFP) mutant tended to accumulate in myoblasts but was incorporated into filamentous structures of myotubes. The K49del-β-TM(EGFP) and E122K-β-TM(EGFP) mutants induced the formation of rod-like structures in human cells. The N202K-β-TM(EGFP) mutant failed to integrate into thin filaments and formed accumulations in myotubes. The accumulation of mutant β-TM(EGFP) in the perinuclear and peripheral areas of the cells was the striking feature in C2C12. We demonstrated that human tissue culture is a suitable system for studying the early stages of altered myofibrilogenesis and morphological changes linked to myopathy-related β-TM mutants. In addition, the histopathological phenotype associated with expression of the various mutant proteins depends on the cell type and varies with the maturation of the muscle cell. Further, the phenotype is a combinatorial effect of the specific amino acid change and the temporal expression of the mutant protein.

  • 2.
    Bachelet, Delphine
    et al.
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France.
    Albert, Thilo
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Germany.
    Mbogning, Cyprien
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France.
    Hässler, Signe
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France.
    Zhang, Yuan
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France.
    Schultze-Strasser, Stephan
    University Hospital Frankfurt, Goethe University, Department of Pediatrics, Molecular Haemostasis and Immunodeficiency, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Repessé, Yohann
    CHU Caen, Hématologie Biologique, Caen, Caen, France.
    Rayes, Julie
    Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR_S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
    Pavlova, Anna
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Pezeshkpoor, Behnaz
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Liphardt, Kerstin
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Davidson, Julie E.
    GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, Middlesex, United Kingdom.
    Hincelin-Méry, Agnès
    Sanofi, Chilly-Mazarin, France.
    Dönnes, Pierre
    SciCross AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien
    Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR_S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
    Königs, Christoph
    University Hospital Frankfurt, Goethe University, Department of Pediatrics, Molecular Haemostasis and Immunodeficiency, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Oldenburg, Johannes
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Broët, Philippe
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France / AP-HP, Paris-Sud University Hospitals, Villejuif, France.
    Risk stratification integrating genetic data for factor VIII inhibitor development in patients with severe hemophilia A2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 6, article id e0218258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Replacement therapy in severe hemophilia A leads to factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors in 30% of patients. Factor VIII gene (F8) mutation type, a family history of inhibitors, ethnicity and intensity of treatment are established risk factors, and were included in two published prediction tools based on regression models. Recently investigated immune regulatory genes could also play a part in immunogenicity. Our objective is to identify bio-clinical and genetic markers for FVIII inhibitor development, taking into account potential genetic high order interactions. The study population consisted of 593 and 79 patients with hemophilia A from centers in Bonn and Frankfurt respectively. Data was collected in the European ABIRISK tranSMART database. A subset of 125 severely affected patients from Bonn with reliable information on first treatment was selected as eligible for risk stratification using a hybrid tree-based regression model (GPLTR). In the eligible subset, 58 (46%) patients developed FVIII inhibitors. Among them, 49 (84%) were "high risk" F8 mutation type. 19 (33%) had a family history of inhibitors. The GPLTR model, taking into account F8 mutation risk, family history of inhibitors and product type, distinguishes two groups of patients: a high-risk group for immunogenicity, including patients with positive HLA-DRB1*15 and genotype G/A and A/A for IL-10 rs1800896, and a low-risk group of patients with negative HLA-DRB1*15 / HLA-DQB1*02 and T/T or G/T for CD86 rs2681401. We show associations between genetic factors and the occurrence of FVIII inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A patients taking into account for high-order interactions using a generalized partially linear tree-based approach.

  • 3.
    Bjerkeli, Pernilla J.
    et al.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden / Unit for Social Epidemiology, Clinical Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lesén, Eva
    Nordic Health Economics AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte
    Research and Development, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sundell, Karolina Andersson
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Refill Adherence in Relation to Substitution and the Use of Multiple Medications: A Nationwide Population Based Study on New ACE-Inhibitor Users2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e0155465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Generic substitution has contributed to economic savings but switching products may affect patient adherence, particularly among those using multiple medications. The aim was to analyse if use of multiple medications influenced the association between switching products and refill adherence to angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in Sweden.

    STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: New users of ACE-inhibitors, starting between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007, were identified in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Refill adherence was assessed using the continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA) and analysed with linear regression and analysis of covariance.

    RESULTS: The study population included 42735 individuals whereof 51.2% were exposed to switching ACE-inhibitor and 39.6% used multiple medications. Refill adherence was higher among those exposed to switching products than those not, but did not vary depending on the use of multiple medications or among those not. Refill adherence varied with age, educational level, household income, country of birth, previous hospitalisation and previous cardiovascular diagnosis.

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate a positive association between refill adherence and switching products, mainly due to generic substitution, among new users of ACE-inhibitors in Sweden. This association was independent of use of multiple medications.

  • 4.
    Chawade, Aakash
    et al.
    CropTailor AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindlöf, Angelica
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. CropTailor AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Olsson, Olof
    CropTailor AB, Lund, Sweden / Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Global expression profiling of low temperature induced genes in the chilling tolerant japonica rice jumli marshi2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. e81729-, article id e81729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low temperature is a key factor that limits growth and productivity of many important agronomical crops worldwide. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is negatively affected already at temperatures below +10°C and is therefore denoted as chilling sensitive. However, chilling tolerant rice cultivars exist and can be commercially cultivated at altitudes up to 3,050 meters with temperatures reaching as low as +4°C. In this work, the global transcriptional response to cold stress (+4°C) was studied in the Nepalese highland variety Jumli Marshi (spp. japonica) and 4,636 genes were identified as significantly differentially expressed within 24 hours of cold stress. Comparison with previously published microarray data from one chilling tolerant and two sensitive rice cultivars identified 182 genes differentially expressed (DE) upon cold stress in all four rice cultivars and 511 genes DE only in the chilling tolerant rice. Promoter analysis of the 182 genes suggests a complex cross-talk between ABRE and CBF regulons. Promoter analysis of the 511 genes identified over-represented ABRE motifs but not DRE motifs, suggesting a role for ABA signaling in cold tolerance. Moreover, 2,101 genes were DE in Jumli Marshi alone. By chromosomal localization analysis, 473 of these cold responsive genes were located within 13 different QTLs previously identified as cold associated.

  • 5.
    Dahl-Halvarsson, Martin
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pokrzywa, Malgorzata
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rauthan, Manish
    Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pilon, Marc
    Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Myosin Storage Myopathy in C. elegans and Human Cultured Muscle Cells2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e0170613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myosin storage myopathy is a protein aggregate myopathy associated with the characteristic subsarcolemmal accumulation of myosin heavy chain in muscle fibers. Despite similar histological findings, the clinical severity and age of onset are highly variable, ranging from no weakness to severe impairment of ambulation, and usually childhood-onset to onset later in life. Mutations located in the distal end of the tail of slow/beta-cardiac myosin heavy chain are associated with myosin storage myopathy. Four missense mutations (L1793P, R1845W, E1883K and H1901L), two of which have been reported in several unrelated families, are located within or closed to the assembly competence domain. This location is critical for the proper assembly of sarcomeric myosin rod filaments. To assess the mechanisms leading to protein aggregation in myosin storage myopathy and to evaluate the impact of these mutations on myosin assembly and muscle function, we expressed mutated myosin proteins in cultured human muscle cells and in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. While L1793P mutant myosin protein efficiently incorporated into the sarcomeric thick filaments, R1845W and H1901L mutants were prone to formation of myosin aggregates without assembly into striated sarcomeric thick filaments in cultured muscle cells. In C. elegans, mutant alleles of the myosin heavy chain gene unc-54 corresponding to R1845W, E1883K and H1901L, were as effective as the wild-type myosin gene in rescuing the null mutant worms, indicating that they retain functionality. Taken together, our results suggest that the basis for the pathogenic effect of the R1845W and H1901L mutations are primarily structural rather than functional. Further analyses are needed to identify the primary trigger for the histological changes seen in muscle biopsies of patients with L1793P and E1883K mutations.

  • 6.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping.
    Backe, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Karlstad University.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University.
    Janson, Staffan
    Karlstad University.
    Timpka, Toomas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Linköping University / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping.
    Is "Football for All" Safe for All?: Cross-Sectional Study of Disparities as Determinants of 1-Year Injury Prevalence in Youth Football Programs2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8, p. e43795-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Football (soccer) is endorsed as a health-promoting physical activity worldwide. When football programs are introduced as part of general health promotion programs, equal access and limitation of pre-participation disparities with regard to injury risk are important. The aim of this study was to explore if disparity with regard to parents’ educational level, player body mass index (BMI), and self-reported health are determinants of football injury in community-based football programs, separately or in interaction with age or gender.

    Methodology/Principal Findings: Four community football clubs with 1230 youth players agreed to participate in the cross-sectional study during the 2006 season. The study constructs (parents’ educational level, player BMI, and self-reported health) were operationalized into questionnaire items. The 1-year prevalence of football injury was defined as the primary outcome measure. Data were collected via a postal survey and analyzed using a series of hierarchical statistical computations investigating associations with the primary outcome measure and interactions between the study variables. The survey was returned by 827 (67.2%) youth players. The 1-year injury prevalence increased with age. For youths with parents with higher formal education, boys reported more injuries and girls reported fewer injuries than expected; for youths with lower educated parents there was a tendency towards the opposite pattern. Youths reporting injuries had higher standardized BMI compared with youths not reporting injuries. Children not reporting full health were slightly overrepresented among those reporting injuries and underrepresented for those reporting no injury.

    Conclusion: Pre-participation disparities in terms of parents’ educational level, through interaction with gender, BMI, and self-reported general health are associated with increased injury risk in community-based youth football. When introduced as a general health promotion, football associations should adjust community-based youth programs to accommodate children and adolescents with increased pre-participation injury risk.

  • 7.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vickes, Oscar
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Kuchipudi, Arunakar
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Wettergren, Yvonne
    Department of General Surgery, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Uv, Anne
    Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rotter Sopasakis, Victoria
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Wallenberg Laboratory, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The unique non-catalytic C-terminus of p37delta-PI3K adds proliferative properties in vitro and in vivo2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0127497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PI3K/Akt pathway is central for numerous cellular functions and is frequently deregulated in human cancers. The catalytic subunits of PI3K, p110, are thought to have a potential oncogenic function, and the regulatory subunit p85 exerts tumor suppressor properties. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a highly suitable system to investigate PI3K signaling, expressing one catalytic, Dp110, and one regulatory subunit, Dp60, and both show strong homology with the human PI3K proteins p110 and p85. We recently showed that p37δ, an alternatively spliced product of human PI3K p110δ, displayed strong proliferation-promoting properties despite lacking the catalytic domain completely. Here we functionally evaluate the different domains of human p37δ in Drosophila. The N-terminal region of Dp110 alone promotes cell proliferation, and we show that the unique C-terminal region of human p37δ further enhances these proliferative properties, both when expressed in Drosophila, and in human HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, although the N-terminal region of Dp110 and the C-terminal region of p37δ both display proliferative effects, over-expression of full length Dp110 or the N-terminal part of Dp110 decreases survival in Drosophila, whereas the unique C-terminal region of p37δ prevents this effect. Furthermore, we found that the N-terminal region of the catalytic subunit of PI3K p110, including only the Dp60 (p85)-binding domain and a minor part of the Ras binding domain, rescues phenotypes with severely impaired development caused by Dp60 over-expression in Drosophila, possibly by regulating the levels of Dp60, and also by increasing the levels of phosphorylated Akt. Our results indicate a novel kinase-independent function of the PI3K catalytic subunit.

  • 8.
    Elgbratt, Kristina
    et al.
    Univ Örebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Jansson, Andreas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Hultgren-Hornquist, Elisabeth
    Univ Örebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    A Quantitative Study of the Mechanisms behind Thymic Atrophy in G alpha i2-Deficient Mice during Colitis Development2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 5, p. e36726-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mice deficient for the G protein subunit G alpha i2 spontaneously develop colitis, a chronic inflammatory disease associated with dysregulated T cell responses. We and others have previously demonstrated a thymic involution in these mice and an aberrant thymocyte dynamics. The G alpha i2(-/-) mice have a dramatically reduced fraction of double positive thymocytes and an increased fraction of single positive (SP) thymocytes. In this study, we quantify a number of critical parameters in order to narrow down the underlying mechanisms that cause the dynamical changes of the thymocyte development in the G alpha i2(-/-) mice. Our data suggest that the increased fraction of SP thymocytes results only from a decreased number of DP thymocytes, since the number of SP thymocytes in the Gai2(-/-) mice is comparable to the control littermates. By measuring the frequency of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) in the thymocytes, we demonstrate that the number of cell divisions the G alpha i2(-/-) SP thymocytes undergo is comparable to SP thymocytes from control littermates. In addition, our data show that the mature SP CD4(+) and CD8(+) thymocytes divide to the same extent before they egress from the thymus. By estimating the number of peripheral TREC+ T lymphocytes and their death rate, we could calculate the daily egression of thymocytes. G alpha i2(-/-) mice with no/mild and moderate colitis were found to have a slower export rate in comparison to the control littermates. The quantitative measurements in this study suggest a number of dynamical changes in the thymocyte development during the progression of colitis.

  • 9.
    Frisk, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Annie
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Sellman, Stefan
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Flisberg, Patrik
    The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rönnqvist, Mikael
    Département de génie mécanique, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
    Wennergren, Uno
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Route optimization as an instrument to improve animal welfare and economics in pre-slaughter logistics2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0193223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each year, more than three million animals are transported from farms to abattoirs in Sweden. Animal transport is related to economic and environmental costs and a negative impact on animal welfare. Time and the number of pick-up stops between farms and abattoirs are two key parameters for animal welfare. Both are highly dependent on efficient and qualitative transportation planning, which may be difficult if done manually. We have examined the benefits of using route optimization in cattle transportation planning. To simulate the effects of various planning time windows and transportation time regulations and number of pick-up stops along each route, we have used data that represent one year of cattle transport. Our optimization model is a development of a model used in forestry transport that solves a general pick-up and delivery vehicle routing problem. The objective is to minimize transportation costs. We have shown that the length of the planning time window has a significant impact on the animal transport time, the total driving time and the total distance driven; these parameters that will not only affect animal welfare but also affect the economy and environment in the pre-slaughter logistic chain. In addition, we have shown that changes in animal transportation regulations, such as minimizing the number of allowed pick-up stops on each route or minimizing animal transportation time, will have positive effects on animal welfare measured in transportation hours and number of pick-up stops. However, this leads to an increase in working time and driven distances, leading to higher transportation costs for the transport and negative environmental impact.

  • 10.
    Holmgren, Noél
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Aps, Robert
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Kuikka, Sakari
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    A Concept of Bayesian Regulation in Fisheries Management2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 11, article id e111614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stochastic variability of biological processes and uncertainty of stock properties compel fisheries managers to look for tools to improve control over the stock. Inspired by animals exploiting hidden prey, we have taken a biomimetic approach combining catch and effort in a concept of Bayesian regulation (BR). The BR provides a real-time Bayesian stock estimate, and can operate without separate stock assessment. We compared the performance of BR with catch-only regulation (CR), alternatively operating with N-target (the stock size giving maximum sustainable yield, MSY) and F-target (the fishing mortality giving MSY) on a stock model of Baltic Sea herring. N-targeted BR gave 3% higher yields than F-targeted BR and CR, and 7% higher yields than N-targeted CR. The BRs reduced coefficient of variance (CV) in fishing mortality compared to CR by 99.6% (from 25.2 to 0.1) when operated with F-target, and by about 80% (from 158.4 to 68.4/70.1 depending on how the prior is set) in stock size when operated with N-target. Even though F-targeted fishery reduced CV in pre-harvest stock size by 19–22%, it increased the dominant period length of population fluctuations from 20 to 60–80 years. In contrast, N-targeted BR made the periodic variation more similar to white noise. We discuss the conditions when BRs can be suitable tools to achieve sustainable yields while minimizing undesirable fluctuations in stock size or fishing effort.

  • 11.
    Hussain, A. H. M. Enayet
    et al.
    Directorate General of Health Services, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ferdoush, Junnatul
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Mashreky, Saidur Rahman
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh / Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh / National Institute of Ophthalmology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, A. K. M. Fazlur
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh / Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh / National Institute of Ophthalmology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ferdausi, Nahid
    National Institute of Ophthalm ology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Higher School of Public Health, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty, Kazakhstan.
    Epidemiology of childhood blindness: A community-based study in Bangladesh2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 6, article id e0211991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and causes of childhood blindness in a rural area of Bangladesh. We adopted a cross-sectional quantitative study design for this study, which was performed in three unions (sub-districts) located in Raiganj Upazila of the Sirajganj district in Bangladesh. Using a validated tool, a screening program was conducted at the household level. After initial screening, a team of ophthalmologists confirmed the diagnoses by clinical examinations. The prevalence of childhood blindness was observed to be 6.3 per 10,000 children, whereas the rate of uniocular blindness was 4.8 per 10,000 children. Congenital problems were the major causes of both uniocular and binocular blindness (uniocular blindness: 84% and binocular blindness: 92%). The whole globe was the site responsible for binocular blindness (28.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 13.1, 47.7), whereas the cornea was responsible for uniocular blindness (57.8%, 95% CI: 35.3, 78.1). Childhood blindness is a public health problem in Bangladesh and is highly prevalent, regardless of sex. The major causes of childhood blindness are congenital.

  • 12.
    Jilani, Hannah S.
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute for Public Health and Nursing Research, University of Bremen and Health Sciences Bremen, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Buchecker, Kirsten
    Department of Food Science, TTZ, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Department of Management, Society and Communication, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Dénes
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pécs, Medical School, Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Department of Management, Society and Communication, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Russo, Paola
    Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Association between parental consumer attitudes with their children's sensory taste preferences as well as their food choice2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0200413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We investigated the association between the consumer attitudes of European parents and their children's taste preferences and food choice. Furthermore, we studied whether the parental consumer attitudes were related to education level.

    Methods This analysis included 1,407 IDEFICS study children aged 6.0 to 11.8 years and from 7 European countries, who participated in the sensory taste perception module between 2007 and 2010. Parental consumer attitude was operationalized as 'trusting in foods known from advertisements' (trusting advertisements) and as 'not avoiding additives in food' (not avoiding additives). Parents reported their educational attainment and completed a food frequency questionnaire for their children. Consumption frequencies of sweet, fatty and processed foods as well as a healthy diet adherence score were calculated. Children performed fat, sweet and umami taste preference tests. Multivariable logistic models were used to analyse the association between parental consumer attitudes and their children's taste preference frequencies as well as parental education. Linear regression models were used to analyse the association between parental consumer attitudes and their children's food consumption.

    Results Parental consumer attitudes were not associated with children's fat, sweet and umami taste preferences. Children of parents trusting advertisements consumed more frequently processed foods (beta = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.49; 1.93). Children of parents not avoiding additives consumed more often sweet, fatty and processed foods and had a lower healthy diet adherence score (beta = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.03; 3.70; beta = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.12; 3.43; beta = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.22; 1.59; beta = -2.87, 95% CI: -3.89; -1.85, respectively). Unfavourable parental consumer attitudes were associated with a lower parental education level across Europe (Compared to high education: Odds Ratio (OR) of trusting advertisements with medium education: 1.04, 95% CI: 0.77; 1.40; OR with low education: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.15; 3.54; OR of not avoiding additives with medium education: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.44; 2.54; OR with low education: 1.76, 95% CI: 0.96; 3.24).

    Conclusions Across Europe, unfavourable parental consumer attitudes are associated with a lower diet quality of their children. Parental consumer attitudes in turn were associated with their own level of education. This has implications for policy makers, interventions and health promotion programmes that aim to promote healthy eating.

  • 13.
    Kajonius, Petri
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Behavioral Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Mac Giolla, Erik
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Personality traits across countries: Support for similarities rather than differences2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1-13, article id e0179646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current climate of migration and globalization, personality characteristics of individualsfrom different countries have received a growing interest. Previous research has establishedreliable differences in personality traits across countries. The present study extends thisresearch by examining 30 personality traits in 22 countries, based on an online survey inEnglish with large national samples (NTotal = 130,602). The instrument used was a comprehensive,open-source measure of the Five Factor Model (FFM) (IPIP-NEO-120). We postulatedthat differences in personality traits between countries would be small, labeling this aSimilarities Hypothesis. We found support for this in three stages. First, similarities acrosscountries were observed for model fits for each of the five personality trait structures. Second,within-country sex differences for the five personality traits showed similar patternsacross countries. Finally, the overall the contribution to personality traits from countries wasless than 2%. In other words, the relationship between a country and an individual's personalitytraits, however interesting, are small. We conclude that the most parsimonious explanationfor the current and past findings is a cross-country personality Similarities Hypothesis.

  • 14.
    Kallio, Sakari
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Hyönä, Jukka
    Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sikka, Pilleriin
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Nummenmaa, Lauri
    Brain Research Unit, Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto University School of Science, Espoo, Finland / Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University School of Science, Espoo, Finland / Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    The Existence of a Hypnotic State Revealed by Eye Movements2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 10, article id e26374Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kharkova, Olga A.
    et al.
    UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
    Grjibovski, Andrej M.
    International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia / Department of International Public Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway / Department of Preventive Medicine, International Kazakh-Turkish University, Kazakhstan / Department of International Public Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway / Department of Preventive Medicine, International Kazakh-Turkish University, Turkestan, Kazakhstan.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nieboer, Evert
    Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Odland, Jon Ø.
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / School of Health Systems and Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    First-trimester smoking cessation in pregnancy did not increase the risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia: A Murmansk County Birth Registry study2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 8, article id e0179354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although prior studies have shown that smoking reduces preeclampsia/eclampsia risk, the consequence of giving up this habit during pregnancy should be assessed. The aims of the current study were threefold: (i) describe maternal characteristics of women with preeclampsia/eclampsia; (ii) examine a possible association between the number of cigarettes smoked daily during pregnancy and the development of this affliction; and (iii) determine if first-trimester discontinuation of smoking during pregnancy influences the risk.

    METHODS: A registry-based study was conducted using data from the Murmansk County Birth Registry (MCBR). It included women without pre-existing hypertension, who delivered a singleton infant during 2006-2011 and had attended the first antenatal visit before 12 week of gestation. We adjusted for potential confounders using logistic regression.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of preeclampsia/eclampsia was 8.3% (95%CI: 8.0-8.6). Preeclampsia/eclampsia associated with maternal age, education, marital status, parity, excessive weight gain and body mass index at the first antenatal visit. There was a dose-response relationship between the number of smoked cigarettes per day during pregnancy and the risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia (adjusted OR1-5 cig/day = 0.69 with 95%CI: 0.56-0.87; OR6-10 cig/day = 0.65 with 95%CI: 0.51-0.82; and OR≥11 cig/day = 0.49 with 95%CI: 0.30-0.81). There was no difference in this risk among women who smoked before and during pregnancy and those who did so before but not during pregnancy (adjusted OR = 1.10 with 95%CI: 0.91-1.32).

    CONCLUSIONS: Preeclampsia/eclampsia was associated with maternal age, education, marital status, parity, excessive weight gain, and body mass index at the first antenatal visit. There was a negative dose-response relationship between the number of smoked cigarettes per day during pregnancy and the odds of preeclampsia/eclampsia. However, women who gave up smoking during the first trimester of gestation had the same risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia as those who smoked while pregnant. Consequently, antenatal clinic specialists are advised to take these various observations into account when counselling women on smoking cessation during pregnancy.

  • 16.
    Koivisto, Mika
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Kirjanen, Svetlana
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Kallio, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    A Preconscious Neural Mechanism of Hypnotically Altered Colors: A Double Case Study2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8, article id e70900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypnotic suggestions may change the perceived color of objects. Given that chromatic stimulus information is processed rapidly and automatically by the visual system, how can hypnotic suggestions affect perceived colors in a seemingly immediate fashion? We studied the mechanisms of such color alterations by measuring electroencephalography in two highly suggestible participants as they perceived briefly presented visual shapes under posthypnotic color alternation suggestions such as "all the squares are blue''. One participant consistently reported seeing the suggested colors. Her reports correlated with enhanced evoked upper beta-band activity (22 Hz) 70-120 ms after stimulus in response to the shapes mentioned in the suggestion. This effect was not observed in a control condition where the participants merely tried to simulate the effects of the suggestion on behavior. The second participant neither reported color alterations nor showed the evoked beta activity, although her subjective experience and event-related potentials were changed by the suggestions. The results indicate a preconscious mechanism that first compares early visual input with a memory representation of the suggestion and consequently triggers the color alteration process in response to the objects specified by the suggestion. Conscious color experience is not purely the result of bottom-up processing but it can be modulated, at least in some individuals, by top-down factors such as hypnotic suggestions.

  • 17.
    Kovalenko, Anton A.
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
    Brenn, Tormod
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Odland, Jon Øyvind
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Nieboer, Evert
    Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anda, Erik Eik
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Risk Factors for hypospadias in Northwest Russia: A Murmansk County Birth Registry Study2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Hypospadias is the most common congenital anomaly of the penis, but its causes are mainly unknown. Of the risk factors identified, the most plausible are hormonal and genetic. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for hypospadias in Northwest Russia based on registry data.

    METHODS: The study population included male infants registered in the Murmansk County Birth Registry between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011 (n = 25 475). These infants were followed-up for 2 years using the Murmansk Regional Congenital Defects Registry to identify cases of hypospadias not diagnosed at birth. We used logistic regression analysis to examine the contributions of hypospadias risk factors.

    RESULTS: Out of 25 475 male infants born during the study period, 148 had isolated hypospadias. The overall prevalence rate was 54.2 (95% CI 53.6-54.8) per 10 000 male infants. Those born to mothers with preeclampsia (OR = 1.65; 95% CI 1.03-2.66) or infant birthweight < 2500 g (OR = 2.06; 95% CI 1.18-3.60) exhibited increased risk for hypospadias. Maternal age, smoking during pregnancy, folic acid intake during pregnancy or hepatitis B surface antigen positivity did not associate with increased risk of hypospadias.

    CONCLUSIONS: Combining data from a birth registry with those from a congenital defects registry provided optimal information about the prevalence of hypospadias and its association with low infant birthweight and preeclampsia. These factors have in common changes in hormone levels during pregnancy, which in turn may have contributed to hypospadias development.

  • 18.
    Kunze, Angelika
    et al.
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden / Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
    Steel, Daniella
    Cellectis AB, Göteborg, Sweden / Abcam, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Dahlenborg, Kerstin
    Cellectis AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Cellectis AB, Göteborg, Sweden / AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Svedhem, Sofia
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Non-Invasive Acoustical sensing of Drug-Induced Effects on the Contractile Machinery of Human Cardiomyocyte Clusters2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 1-10, article id e0125540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an urgent need for improved models for cardiotoxicity testing. Here we propose acoustic sensing applied to beating human cardiomyocyte clusters for non-invasive, surrogate measuring of the QT interval and other characteristics of the contractile machinery. In experiments with the acoustic method quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), the shape of the recorded signals was very similar to the extracellular field potential detected in electrochemical experiments, and the expected changes of the QT interval in response to addition of conventional drugs (E-4031 or nifedipine) were observed. Additionally, changes in the dissipation signal upon addition of cytochalasin D were in good agreement with the known, corresponding shortening of the contraction-relaxation time. These findings suggest that QCM-D has great potential as a tool for cardiotoxicological screening, where effects of compounds on the cardiomyocyte contractile machinery can be detected independently of whether the extracellular field potential is altered or not.

  • 19.
    Lennartsson, Jenny
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Håkansson, Nina
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Biology and Chemistry, Theory and Modelling, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wennergren, Uno
    Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Biology and Chemistry, Theory and Modelling, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Annie
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    SpecNet: A Spatial Network Algorithm that Generates a Wide Range of Specific Structures2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e42679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network measures are used to predict the behavior of different systems. To be able to investigate how various structures behave and interact we need a wide range of theoretical networks to explore. Both spatial and non-spatial methods exist for generating networks but they are limited in the ability of producing wide range of network structures. We extend an earlier version of a spatial spectral network algorithm to generate a large variety of networks across almost all the theoretical spectra of the following network measures: average clustering coefficient, degree assortativity, fragmentation index, and mean degree. We compare this extended spatial spectral network-generating algorithm with a non-spatial algorithm regarding their ability to create networks with different structures and network measures. The spatial spectral networkgenerating algorithm can generate networks over a much broader scale than the non-spatial and other known network algorithms. To exemplify the ability to regenerate real networks, we regenerate networks with structures similar to two real Swedish swine transport networks. Results show that the spatial algorithm is an appropriate model with correlation coefficients at 0.99. This novel algorithm can even create negative assortativity and managed to achieve assortativity values that spans over almost the entire theoretical range.

  • 20.
    Lindlöf, Angelica
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Chawade, Aakash
    CropTailor AB, Department of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden / Department of Immunotechnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sikora, Per
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Olof
    CropTailor AB, Department of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden / Department of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Comparative Transcriptomics of Sijung and Jumli Marshi Rice during Early Chilling Stress Imply Multiple Protective Mechanisms2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0125385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Low temperature is one of the major environmental factors that adversely affect plant growth and yield. Many cereal crops from tropical regions, such as rice, are chilling sensitive and, therefore, are affected already at <10°C. Interestingly, it has been demonstrated that chilling susceptibility varies greatly among rice varieties, which indicates differences in the underlying molecular responses. Understanding these differences is vital for continued development of rational breeding and transgenic strategies for more tolerant varieties. Thus, in this study, we conducted a comparative global gene expression profiling analysis of the chilling tolerant varieties Sijung and Jumli Marshi (spp. Japonica) during early chilling stress (<24 h, 10°C).

    Methods and Results

    Global gene expression experiments were conducted with Agilent Rice Gene Expression Microarray 4x44K. The analysed results showed that there was a relatively low (percentage or number) overlap in differentially expressed genes in the two varieties and that substantially more genes were up-regulated in Jumli Marshi than in Sijung but the number of down-regulated genes were higher in Sijung. In broad GO annotation terms, the activated response pathways in Sijung and Jumli Marshi were coherent, as a majority of the genes belonged to the catalytic, transcription regulator or transporter activity categories. However, a more detailed analysis revealed essential differences. For example, in Sijung, activation of calcium and phosphorylation signaling pathways, as well as of lipid transporters and exocytosis-related proteins take place very early in the stress response. Such responses can be coupled to processes aimed at strengthening the cell wall and plasma membrane against disruption. On the contrary, in Jumli Marshi, sugar production, detoxification, ROS scavenging, protection of chloroplast translation, and plausibly the activation of the jasmonic acid pathway were the very first response activities. These can instead be coupled to detoxification processes.

    Conclusions

    Based on the results inferred from this study, we conclude that different, but overlapping, strategies are undertaken by the two varieties to cope with the chilling stress; in Sijung the initial molecular responses seem to be mainly targeted at strengthening the cell wall and plasma membrane, whereas in Jumli Marshi the protection of chloroplast translation and detoxification is prioritized.

  • 21.
    Ljungström, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jacobsson, Gunnar
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / CARe–Center for Antibiotic Resistance Research, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Rune
    CARe–Center for Antibiotic Resistance Research, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Usener, Barbara
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Tilevik, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin, neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio, C-reactive protein, and lactate in patients with suspected bacterial sepsis2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 7, article id e018704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Early recognition is a key factor to achieve improved outcomes for septic patients. Combinations of biomarkers, as opposed to single ones, may improve timely diagnosis and survival. We investigated the performance characteristics of sepsis biomarkers, alone and in combination, for diagnosis of verified bacterial sepsis using Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria, respectively.

    METHODS:

    Procalcitonin (PCT), neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and lactate were determined in a total of 1,572 episodes of adult patients admitted to the emergency department on suspicion of sepsis. All sampling were performed prior to antibiotic administration. Discriminant analysis was used to construct two composite biomarkers consisting of linear combinations of the investigated biomarkers, one including three selected biomarkers (i.e., NLCR, CRP, and lactate), and another including all four (i.e., PCT, NLCR, CRP, and lactate). The diagnostic performances of the composite biomarkers as well as the individual biomarkers were compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC).

    RESULTS:

    For diagnosis of bacterial sepsis based on Sepsis-3 criteria, the AUC for PCT (0.68; 95% CI 0.65-0.71) was comparable to the AUCs for the both composite biomarkers. Using the Sepsis-2 criteria for bacterial sepsis diagnosis, the AUC for the NLCR (0.68; 95% CI 0.65-0.71) but not for the other single biomarkers, was equal to the AUCs for the both composite biomarkers. For diagnosis of severe bacterial sepsis or septic shock based on the Sepsis-2 criteria, the AUCs for both composite biomarkers were significantly greater than those of the single biomarkers (0.85; 95% CI 0.82-0.88 for the composite three-biomarker, and 0.86; 95% CI 0.83-0.89 for the composite four-biomarker).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Combinations of biomarkers can improve the diagnosis of verified bacterial sepsis in the most critically ill patients, but in less severe septic conditions either the NLCR or PCT alone exhibit equivalent performance.

  • 22.
    Lubovac-Pilav, Zelmina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Borràs, Daniel M.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ponce, Esmeralda
    Dominican University of California, United States of America.
    Louie, Maggie C.
    Dominican University of California, United States of America / College of Pharmacy, Touro University of California, United States of America .
    Using expression profiling to understand the effects of chronic cadmium exposure on mcf-7 breast cancer cells2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, article id e84646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cadmium is a metalloestrogen known to activate the estrogen receptor and promote breast cancer cell growth. Previous studies have implicated cadmium in the development of more malignant tumors; however the molecular mechanisms behind this cadmium-induced malignancy remain elusive. Using clonal cell lines derived from exposing breast cancer cells to cadmium for over 6 months (MCF-7-Cd4, -Cd6, -Cd7, -Cd8 and -Cd12), this study aims to identify gene expression signatures associated with chronic cadmium exposure. Our results demonstrate that prolonged cadmium exposure does not merely result in the deregulation of genes but actually leads to a distinctive expression profile. The genes deregulated in cadmium-exposed cells are involved in multiple biological processes (i.e. cell growth, apoptosis, etc.) and molecular functions (i.e. cadmium/metal ion binding, transcription factor activity, etc.). Hierarchical clustering demonstrates that the five clonal cadmium cell lines share a common gene expression signature of breast cancer associated genes, clearly differentiating control cells from cadmium exposed cells. The results presented in this study offer insights into the cellular and molecular impacts of cadmium on breast cancer and emphasize the importance of studying chronic cadmium exposure as one possible mechanism of promoting breast cancer progression.

  • 23.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    et al.
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden / Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ängarne-Lindberg, Teresia
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Division of Paediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden / Paediatric Clinic, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Division of Nursing Sciences, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    As Facts and Chats Go Online, What Is Important for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes?2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6, article id e67659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Continued refinement of resources for patient information, education and support is needed. Considering the rapid development of new communication practices, the perspectives of young people themselves warrant more attention using a wide research focus. The purpose of this study was to understand information-seeking behaviours, Internet use and social networking online in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). This applied to their everyday life, including the context of diabetes and their experiences and need of contact with T1DM peers.Methodology/Principal Findings:Twenty-four adolescents aged 10-17 years with T1DM were recruited from a county hospital in the south-east of Sweden. Qualitative data were obtained using eight focus groups, wherein each participant engaged in a 60-90 minute video/audio-recorded session. The focus group data were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Some demographic and medical information was also collected. The three main categories that were identified; Aspects of Security, Updating, and Plainness and their sub-categories gave significant information about how to enhance information retrieval and peer contacts related to T1DM. Regarding the persons' information-seeking behaviour, Internet use, and use of social media some differences could be identified depending on gender and age.Conclusions/Significance:Sensitivity and adaptation to users' needs and expectations seem crucial in the development of future online resources for adolescents with T1DM. To start with, this could mean applying a wider range of already existing information and communication technologies. Health practitioners need to focus on the areas of security of information and communication, frequency of updating, and simplicity of design-less is more. © 2013 Nordfeldt et al.

  • 24.
    Norrström, Niclas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Getz, Wayne M.
    Department of Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, United States of America / School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
    Holmgren, Noél M. A.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Selection against Accumulating Mutations in Niche-Preference Genes Can Drive Speciation2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 12, p. 29487-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our current understanding of sympatric speciation is that it occurs primarily through disruptive selection on ecological genes driven by competition, followed by reproductive isolation through reinforcement-like selection against inferior intermediates/heterozygotes. Our evolutionary model of selection on resource recognition and preference traits suggests a new mechanism for sympatric speciation. We find speciation can occur in three phases. First a polymorphism of functionally different phenotypes is established through evolution of specialization. On the gene level, regulatory functions have evolved in which some alleles are conditionally switched off (i.e. are silent). These alleles accumulate harmful mutations that potentially may be expressed in offspring through recombination. Second mating associated with resource preference invades because harmful mutations in parents are not expressed in the offspring when mating assortatively, thereby dividing the population into two pre-zygotically isolated resource-specialist lineages. Third, silent alleles that evolved in phase one now accumulate deleterious mutations over the following generations in a Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller fashion, establishing a post-zygotic barrier to hybridization.

  • 25.
    Oli, Natalia
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Pahkala, Katja
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Knowledge, attitude and practice on diet and physical activity among mothers with young children in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site, Nepal2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0200329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is increasing in low and middle-income countries; Nepal's population shows a high prevalence of behavioral risk factors. Our cross-sectional study in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site (JD-HDSS), located near the capital Kathmandu, explored knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of mothers with young children regarding diet and physical activity and mothers' perception of their children's attitude and behavior toward the same issues. The purpose of our study was to assess needs of the mothers concerning cardiovascular health in general and more specifically regarding diet and physical activity, and to establish a baseline for future intervention in the community by comparing two villages of JD-HDSS. In August-November 2014, nine trained enumerators interviewed all mothers of children aged 1-7 years (N = 962). We scored responses on dietary and physical activity KAP, then categorized the scores based on the percentage obtained out of the maximum possible scores into "poor," "fair," and "good." More highly educated mothers scored higher for KAP (all p<0.001); the children's behavior score reflected their mother's education level (p = 0.007). Most respondents were unfamiliar with the concept of healthy and unhealthy food. Overall, 57% of respondents in JD-HDSS had "good" knowledge, 44.6% had "good" attitude, and most (90%) had "poor" practice. We observed no significant differences between the villages regarding mothers' knowledge and attitude or children's behavior. Practice score of mothers in Jhaukhel was higher than those in Duwakot regarding diet and physical activity (p<0.001). Mothers' perceived barriers for improving lifestyle were high cost of healthy food, taste preference of other family members, and lack of knowledge regarding healthy food. Barriers for physical activity were lack of leisure time, absence of parks and playgrounds, busy caring for children and old people, feeling lazy, and embarrassed to be physically active in front of others. Our findings suggest that a health education intervention promoting a healthy lifestyle for mothers and children might improve KAP and also improve cardiovascular health. To address mothers' gap between knowledge and practice, a future intervention should consider perceived barriers.

  • 26.
    Perlaki, Gabor
    et al.
    MTA-PTE Clinical Neuroscience MR Research Group, Pecs, Hungary / Department of Neurology, University of Pecs, Medical School, Hungary.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pecs, Medical School, Pecs, Hungary.
    Smeets, Paul A. M.
    Utrecht University, Netherlands / Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erhard, Peter
    University of Bremen, Germany.
    van Meer, Floor
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Herrmann, Manfred
    University of Bremen, Germany.
    Janszky, Jozsef
    MTA-PTE Clinical Neuroscience MR Research Group, Pecs, Hungary / Department of Neurology, University of Pecs, Medical School, Hungary.
    Orsi, Gergely
    MTA-PTE Clinical Neuroscience MR Research Group, Pecs, Hungary / Department of Neurology, University of Pecs, Medical School, Hungary.
    Volumetric gray matter measures of amygdala and accumbens in childhood overweight/obesity2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 10, article id e0205331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Neuroimaging data suggest that pediatric overweight and obesity are associated with morphological alterations in gray matter (GM) brain structures, but previous studies using mainly voxel-based morphometry (VBM) showed inconsistent results. Here, we aimed to examine the relationship between youth obesity and the volume of predefined reward system structures using magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry. We also aimed to complement volumetry with VBM-style analysis. Methods Fifty-one Caucasian young subjects (32 females; mean age: 13.8±1.9, range: 10.2–16.5 years) were included. Subjects were selected from a subsample of the I.Family study examined in the Hungarian center. A T1-weighted 1 mm3 isotropic resolution image was acquired. Age- and sex-standardized body mass index (zBMI) was assessed at the day of MRI and ~1.89 years (mean±SD: 689±188 days) before the examination. Obesity related GM alterations were investigated using MR volumetry in five predefined brain structures presumed to play crucial roles in body weight regulation (hippocampus, amygdala, accumbens, caudate, putamen), as well as whole-brain and regional VBM. Results The volumes of accumbens and amygdala showed significant positive correlations with zBMI, while their GM densities were inversely related to zBMI. Voxel-based GM mass also showed significant negative correlation with zBMI when investigated in the predefined amygdala region, but this relationship was mediated by GM density. Conclusions Overweight/obesity related morphometric brain differences already seem to be present in children/adolescents. Our work highlights the disparity between volume and VBM-derived measures and that GM mass (combination of volume and density) is not informative in the context of obesity related volumetric changes. To better characterize the association between childhood obesity and GM morphometry, a combination of volumetric segmentation and VBM methods, as well as future longitudinal studies are necessary. Our results suggest that childhood obesity is associated with enlarged structural volumes, but decreased GM density in the reward system. © 2018 Perlaki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  • 27.
    Pokrzywa, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Medical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Norum, Michaela
    Department of Clinical and Medical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lengqvist, Johan
    Proteomic Core Facility, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ghobadpour, Mehrnaz
    Department of Clinical and Medical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Abdul-Hussein, Saba
    Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moslemi, Ali-Reza
    Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Developmental MYH3 Myopathy Associated with Expression of Mutant Protein and Reduced Expression Levels of Embryonic MyHC2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e0142094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    An essential role for embryonic MyHC in foetal development has been found from its association with distal arthrogryposis syndromes, a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by congenital contractions. The latter probably result from severe myopathy during foetal development. Lack of embryonic muscle biopsy material and suitable animal models has hindered study of the pathomechanisms linking mutations in MYH3 to prenatal myopathy.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    We determined the pathomechanisms of developmental myopathy caused by recurrent p.Thr178Ile MYH3 heterozygosity, using patient-derived skeletal muscle cells in culture as an experimental disease model to emulate early embryonic development. These cultured cells were processed for discrimination and quantitative analysis of mutant and wild-type MYH3 alleles and MyHC transcripts, real-time RT-qPCR, sequence analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblot, and proteomic assessments. Involvement of the ubiquitin proteasome system was investigated in patients with p.Thr178Ile mutations in MYH3 and MYH2. We found equal overall expression of mutant and wild-type MyHC mRNAs and proteins. Compared to the controls, however, expression of embryonic MyHC transcripts and proteins was reduced whereas expression of myosin-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase (MuRF1) was increased. We also found delayed myofibrillogenesis and atrophic myotubes but structured sarcomeres.

    CONCLUSION:

    In conclusion, this study suggests that developmental p.Thr178Ile MYH3 myopathy is associated with a combined pathomechanism of insufficient dosage of functional embryonic MyHC and production of mutant protein.

  • 28.
    Reeske, Anna
    et al.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Spallek, Jacob
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bielefeld, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Int Publ Hlth, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany.
    Bammann, Karin
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Publ Hlth & Nursing Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Kourides, Yiannis
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Nagy, Peter
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Stat, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Migrant Background and Weight Gain in Early Infancy: Results from the German Study Sample of the IDEFICS Study2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e60648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine variations in infant weight gain between children of parents with and without migrant background and to investigate how these differences are explained by pre- and perinatal factors. Methods: We used data on birth weight and weight at six months from well-child check-up books that were collected from a population-based German sample of children in the IDEFICS study (n = 1,287). We calculated unadjusted and adjusted means for weight z-scores at birth and six months later. We applied linear regression for change in weight z-score and we calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for rapid weight gain by logistic regression, adjusted for biological, social and behavioural factors. Results: Weight z-scores for migrants and Germans differed slightly at birth, but were markedly increased for Turkish and Eastern European infants at age six months. Turkish infants showed the highest change in weight z-score during the first 6 months (beta = 0.35; 95% CI 0.14-0.56) and an increased probability of rapid weight gain compared with German infants. Examination of the joint effect of migrant and socioeconomic status (SES) showed the greatest change in weight z-scores in Turkish infants from middle SES families (beta = 0.77; 95% CI 0.40-1.14) and infants of parents from Eastern European countries with high SES (beta = 0.72; 95% CI 0.13-1.32). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that migrant background is an independent risk factor for infant weight gain and suggest that the onset of health inequalities in overweight starts in early infancy.

  • 29.
    Riquelme Medina, Ignacio
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Lubovac-Pilav, Zelmina
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis for Identifying Modules and Functionally Enriched Pathways in Type 1 Diabetes2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0156006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease, caused by the autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing pancreatic beta cells, resulting in the body?s inability to produce insulin. While great efforts have been put into understanding the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the etiology of the disease, the exact molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. T1D is a heterogeneous disease, and previous research in this field is mainly focused on the analysis of single genes, or using traditional gene expression profiling, which generally does not reveal the functional context of a gene associated with a complex disorder. However, network-based analysis does take into account the interactions between the diabetes specific genes or proteins and contributes to new knowledge about disease modules, which in turn can be used for identification of potential new biomarkers for T1D. In this study, we analyzed public microarray data of T1D patients and healthy controls by applying a systems biology approach that combines network-based Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) with functional enrichment analysis. Novel co-expression gene network modules associated with T1D were elucidated, which in turn provided a basis for the identification of potential pathways and biomarker genes that may be involved in development of T1D.

  • 30.
    Teder, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Morelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Sweden / Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Bolme, Per
    Linköping University, Sweden / Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Wilhelm, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Family-Based Behavioural Intervention Program for Obese Children: An Observational Study of Child and Parent Lifestyle Interpretations2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8, article id e71482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family-based behavioural intervention programs (FBIPs) against childhood obesity have shown promising results, but the mediating mechanisms have not been identified. The aim of this study was to examine changes in obese childrens lifestyle habits during a 2-year FBIP according to their own and parents' reports, the concordance between these reports and the correlations to change in post-intervention z-BMI. Methods: An observational study of 26 children (8.3-12.0 years) and their parents participating in a 2-year FBIP was performed. Weight and height were measured from baseline to 12 months after the end of the program. Eating habits and physical-and sedentary activity were reported separately by children and parents. Data were analysed with regard to concordance between parents' and children's reports and association between the lifestyle reports and change in z-BMI at the study endpoint using descriptive statistics and parametric and non-parametric tests. Results: According to both children's and parents' reports, the level of physical activity among the children had increased after the intervention as well as the agreement between the informants' reports. According to the children, eating habits had improved, while the parents' reports showed an improvement only with regard to binge eating. The concordance between children and parents regarding eating habits was slight to fair also after the intervention. No statistically significant associations between changes in lifestyle reports and changes in z-BMI were observed. Conclusions: Child and parent reports of physical activity were found to converge and display an improvement in a 2-year FBIP, while the reports on eating habits showed a more refractory pattern. Changes in concordance and agreement between children and parents reports did not correlate with weight reduction. Further methods development and studies of the processes during family-based interventions against childhood obesity are warranted.

  • 31.
    Ulfenborg, Benjamin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Karlsson, Alexander
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Riveiro, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Améen, Caroline
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karolina
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Christian X.
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Global Medicines Development Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    A data analysis framework for biomedical big data: Application on mesoderm differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 6, article id e0179613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of high-throughput biomolecular technologies has resulted in generation of vast omics data at an unprecedented rate. This is transforming biomedical research into a big data discipline, where the main challenges relate to the analysis and interpretation of data into new biological knowledge. The aim of this study was to develop a framework for biomedical big data analytics, and apply it for analyzing transcriptomics time series data from early differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells towards the mesoderm and cardiac lineages. To this end, transcriptome profiling by microarray was performed on differentiating human pluripotent stem cells sampled at eleven consecutive days. The gene expression data was analyzed using the five-stage analysis framework proposed in this study, including data preparation, exploratory data analysis, confirmatory analysis, biological knowledge discovery, and visualization of the results. Clustering analysis revealed several distinct expression profiles during differentiation. Genes with an early transient response were strongly related to embryonic-and mesendoderm development, for example CER1 and NODAL. Pluripotency genes, such as NANOG and SOX2, exhibited substantial downregulation shortly after onset of differentiation. Rapid induction of genes related to metal ion response, cardiac tissue development, and muscle contraction were observed around day five and six. Several transcription factors were identified as potential regulators of these processes, e.g. POU1F1, TCF4 and TBP for muscle contraction genes. Pathway analysis revealed temporal activity of several signaling pathways, for example the inhibition of WNT signaling on day 2 and its reactivation on day 4. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of biological events and key regulators of the early differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells towards the mesoderm and cardiac lineages. The proposed analysis framework can be used to structure data analysis in future research, both in stem cell differentiation, and more generally, in biomedical big data analytics.

  • 32.
    Virta, Maarit
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Hiltunen, Seppo
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Mattsson, Markus
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kallio, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Turku, Finland.
    The impact of hypnotic suggestions on reaction times in continuous performance test in adults with ADHD and healthy controls2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0126497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attention is one of the key factors in both hypnotic processes and patients with ADHD. In addition, the brain areas associated with hypnosis and ADHD overlap in many respects. However, the use of hypnosis in ADHD patients has still received only minor attention in research. The main purpose of the present work was to investigate whether hypnosis and hypnotic suggestions influence the performance of adult ADHD (n = 27) and control participants (n = 31) in the continuous performance test (CPT). The hypnotic susceptibility of the participants was measured by the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility (HGSHS:A) and the attentional task was a three minute long auditory version of the CPT. The CPT task was administered four times: before hypnosis (CPT1), after a hypnotic induction (CPT2), after suggestions about speed and accuracy (CPT3), and after the termination of hypnosis (CPT4). The susceptibility of the groups measured by HGSHS:A did not differ. There was a statistically significant decrease in reaction times in both ADHD and control groups between CPT2 and CPT3. The differences between CPT1 and CPT2, even though non-significant, were different in the two groups: in the ADHD group reaction times decreased whereas in the control group they increased. Both groups made very few errors in the short CPT. This study indicates that hypnotic suggestions have an effect on reaction times in the sustained attention task both in adult ADHD patients and control subjects. The theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

  • 33.
    Visuttijai, Kittichate
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Pettersson, Jennifer
    Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Mehrbani Azar, Yashar
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    van den Bout, Iman
    Department of physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Örndal, Charlotte
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Marcickiewicz, Janusz
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Halland Hospital Varberg, Varberg.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Institute of Mathematical Statistics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg.
    Hörnquist, Michael
    Department of Science and Technology, University of Linköping, Norrköping.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Lowered Expression of Tumor Suppressor Candidate MYO1CStimulates Cell Proliferation, Suppresses Cell Adhesion and Activates AKT2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, article id e0164063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myosin-1C (MYO1C) is a tumor suppressor candidate located in a region of recurrent losses distal to TP53. Myo1c can tightly and specifically bind to PIP2, the substrate of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and to Rictor, suggesting a role for MYO1C in the PI3K pathway. This study was designed to examine MYO1C expression status in a panel of well-stratified endometrial carcinomas as well as to assess the biological significance of MYO1C as a tumor suppressor in vitro. We found a significant correlation between the tumor stage and lowered expression of MYO1C in endometrial carcinoma samples. In cell transfection experiments, we found a negative correlation between MYO1C expression and cell proliferation, and MYO1C silencing resulted in diminished cell migration and adhesion. Cells expressing excess of MYO1C had low basal level of phosphorylated protein kinase B (PKB, a.k.a. AKT) and cells with knocked down MYO1C expression showed a quicker phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) response in reaction to serum stimulation. Taken together the present study gives further evidence for tumor suppressor activity of MYO1C and suggests MYO1C mediates its tumor suppressor function through inhibition of PI3K pathway and its involvement in loss of contact inhibition.

  • 34.
    Wobst, Heike J.
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, Tufts Laboratory for Basic and Translational Neuroscience, Tufts University, Boston, United States.
    Delsing, Louise
    AstraZeneca-Tufts Laboratory for Basic and Translational Neuroscience, Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States of America / AstraZeneca, Discovery Science, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Brandon, Nicholas J.
    AstraZeneca, Tufts Laboratory for Basic and Translational Neuroscience, Tufts University, Boston, United States / AstraZeneca, Neuroscience, Innovative Medicines and Early Development, Waltham, United States.
    Moss, Stephen J.
    AstraZeneca, Tufts Laboratory for Basic and Translational Neuroscience, Tufts University, Boston, United States / Department of Neuroscience, Tufts University, School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States.
    Truncation of the TAR DNA-binding protein 43 is not a prerequisite for cytoplasmic relocalization, and is suppressed by caspase inhibition and by introduction of the A90V sequence variant2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e0177181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The RNA-binding and -processing protein TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is heavily linked to the underlying causes and pathology of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. In these diseases, TDP-43 is mislocalized, hyperphosphorylated, ubiquitinated, aggregated and cleaved. The importance of TDP-43 cleavage in the disease pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we detail the use of D-sorbitol as an exogenous stressor that causes TDP-43 cleavage in HeLa cells, resulting in a 35 kDa truncated product that accumulates in the cytoplasm within one hour of treatment. We confirm that the formation of this 35 kDa cleavage product is mediated by the activation of caspases. Inhibition of caspases blocks the cleavage of TDP-43, but does not prevent the accumulation of full-length protein in the cytoplasm. Using D-sorbitol as a stressor and caspase activator, we also demonstrate that the A90V variant of TDP-43, which lies adjacent to the caspase cleavage site within the nuclear localization sequence of TDP-43, confers partial resistance against caspase-mediated generation of the 35 kDa cleavage product.

  • 35.
    Östensson, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Montén, Caroline
    Diabetes and Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bacelis, Jonas
    Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.
    Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Department of Pediatrics, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adamovic, Svetlana
    Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ek, Johan
    Buskerud Central Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Drammen, Norway.
    Ascher, Henry
    Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Unit of Social Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pollak, Elisabet
    Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Arnell, Henrik
    Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browaldh, Lars
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Agardh, Daniel
    Diabetes and Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Jan
    Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Torinsson-Naluai, Åsa
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A Possible Mechanism behind Autoimmune Disorders Discovered By Genome-Wide Linkage and Association Analysis in Celiac Disease2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8, article id e70174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disorder characterized by an intestinal inflammation triggered by gluten, a storage protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Similar to other autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease is the result of an immune response to self-antigens leading to tissue destruction and production of autoantibodies. Common diseases like celiac disease have a complex pattern of inheritance with inputs from both environmental as well as additive and non-additive genetic factors. In the past few years, Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding genetic risk variants behind many common diseases and traits. To complement and add to the previous findings, we performed a GWAS including 206 trios from 97 nuclear Swedish and Norwegian families affected with celiac disease. By stratifying for HLA-DQ, we identified a new genome-wide significant risk locus covering the DUSP10 gene. To further investigate the associations from the GWAS we performed pathway analyses and two-locus interaction analyses. These analyses showed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and identified a set of candidate mechanisms and genes of which some were selected for mRNA expression analysis using small intestinal biopsies from 98 patients. Several genes were expressed differently in the small intestinal mucosa from patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to intestinal mucosa from control patients. From top-scoring regions we identified susceptibility genes in several categories: 1) polarity and epithelial cell functionality; 2) intestinal smooth muscle; 3) growth and energy homeostasis, including proline and glutamine metabolism; and finally 4) innate and adaptive immune system. These genes and pathways, including specific functions of DUSP10, together reveal a new potential biological mechanism that could influence the genesis of celiac disease, and possibly also other chronic disorders with an inflammatory component.

1 - 35 of 35
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf