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  • 1.
    Engqvist, Inger
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Skaraborg Hospitals, Falköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The recovery process of postpartum psychosis from both the woman's and next of kin's perspective: An interview study in Sweden2014In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 8-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Objectives: The most serious type of psychiatric disorder in connection with childbirth is postpartum psychosis. With this disorder occasionally follows emotional rejection of the infant which has serious long term effect on mother and child. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of the recovery process of postpartum psychosis from the women, from the partners of the women, and their next of kin.

    Methods: Interviews were conducted with seven women, who had previously suffered postpartum psychosis, and six of their next of kin. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.

    Results: Two categories emerged: the recovery process and the circumstances of the support provided. The women and their next of kin spoke about the turning point in the illness, their own personal as well as their social recovery, the importance of support not only from relatives and friends, but also from professionals, and the use of medication. However, the key to recovery was an internal decision by the women themselves.

    Conclusion: Conclusion is that the recovery from this severe mental disorder requires hard work and the key to their recovery was the decision made by the women. This disorder causes a mental darkness to descend, but at the start of the recovery a dim light shines in the dark tunnel. The nursing staff must be made aware that good sleep is important for the psychiatric treatment and that recovery may take a long time. The nurse needs to provide hope and encouragement, as well as help the woman to recognise the strength that exists within her. To reduce the risk of a recurrence of the disorder, the staff needs to offer follow up visits.

  • 2.
    Karlsson, Christina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Registered Nurses' View of Performing Pain Assessment among Persons with Dementia as Consultant Advisors2012In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 62-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain assessment in persons with dementia is well known as a challenging issue to professional caregivers, because of these patients´ difficulties in verbalising pain problems. Within municipal dementia care in Sweden, pain assessment has become problematic for registered nurses, as they have entered a new role in their nursing profession, from being clinical practitioners to becoming consultant advisers to other health care staff.

    Aim: To present municipal registered nurses´ view of pain assessment in persons with dementia in relation to their nursing profession as consultant advisers.

    Methods: Purposive sampling was undertaken with 11 nurses invited to participate. Data were collected by focus groups. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

    Findings: Four categories were identified to describe registered nurses´ view of pain assessment: estrangement from practical nursing care, time consuming and unsafe pain documentation, unfulfilled needs of reflection possibilities, and collaboration and coordination.

    Conclusions: The performance of pain assessment through a consultant advising function is experienced as frustrating and as an uncomfortable nursing situation. The nurses feel resistance to providing nursing in this way. They view nursing as a clinical task demanding daily presence among patients to enable them to make accurate and safe assessments. However, due to the consultative model, setting aside enough time for the presence seems difficult to accomplish. It is necessary to promote the quality of systematic routines in pain assessment and reflection, as well as developing professional knowledge of how pain can be expressed by dementia patients, especially those with communication difficulties.

  • 3.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences, Östersund, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Bräcke Diakoni Foundation, Research Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden / Karolinska Institutet, Institution of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Medical Management Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Clinical Trial Unit. Gothenburg, Sweden / The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden.
    Living in the Presence of Death: An Integrative Literature Review of Relatives' Important Existential Concerns when Caring for a Severely Ill Family Member2012In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 6, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore relatives’ existential concerns when caring for a seriously ill family member as well as to describe interventions that meet these concerns.

    Methods: In this integrative literature review we assessed and classified 17 papers, 12 qualitative and 5 quantitative. Literature was sought in the databases Cinahl, PubMed, Psykinfo and Web of Science in September 2009 and in March 2010. Search terms used in different combinations were: family, family caregiver, next of kin, relatives, palliative, palliative care, end-of-life care, existential, spirit*. Data were redrawn from the papers results/findings, and synthesized into a new descriptive content.

    Results: The results were categorized from 13 papers exploring relatives’ important existential concerns and 4 papers describing interventions aimed to support them in the existential area. A majority of the reviewed papers had been written in Sweden and concerned relatives of patients with cancer. One overarching theme, living in the presence of death, and three categories: responses to life close to death; support when death is near; and beyond the presence of death were created.

    Conclusion: There is an urgent demand for large-scale studies using accurate methodology, as well as a need to design qualified investigations regarding the effects of various interventions, and to determine which interventions are the most effective in supporting relatives who experience existential distress manifested physically and/or psychologically. There is also a considerable demand for educational interventions among professionals in various healthcare settings to increase their knowledge regarding existential concerns among relatives.

  • 4.
    Rosén, Helena I.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Bergh, Ingrid H.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Odén, Anders
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Patients´ Experiences of Pain Following Day Surgery - At 48 Hours, Seven Days and Three Months2011In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 5, p. 52-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies indicate that patients experience pain after day surgery for a longer period than previously known. This requires verification. This was a prospective, descriptive correlational study. A convenience sample of 298 day surgery patients undergoing various surgical procedures was asked to report pain intensity and its interference with daily function 48 hours, seven days and three months after day surgery. Correlation and regression analyses were performed. On a NRS, 55% (n=230) reported pain (≥4) 48 hours after surgery, as did 43% (n=213) at seven days. Pain interfered with normal activities at ≥4 NRS at 48 hours and at seven days, after which it decreased.

  • 5.
    Warrén Stomberg, Margareta
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nursing Students' Self-Graded Motivation to Complete their Programme of Study2010In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 4, p. 42-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore variation in nursing students’ motivation to complete their programme of study,  as  well  as  factors  relating  to  low  versus  high  motivation  and  students’  opinions  of  what  would  increase  their motivation to complete their programme of study. A study was carried out between April 2006 and December 2007. A total of 872 students registered in a 3-year nursing programme  randomly  participated  in  self-rating  their  motivation  score  once  each  semester.  Descriptive  statistics, statistical calculations and content analysis regarding open-ended questions were performed. Most of the students, 73%, rated their motivation as ≥6 on a 0-10 Likert scale; and 16% gave a rating of ≤4. The desire to become  a registered nurse (RN)  and having  a positive  attitude towards the  studies were  the main factors influencing high motivation to complete the programme of study. Having a negative attitude towards the studies was an explanation of decreased motivation. There was a significant decrease (p=0.001) in the motivation score with respect to number of semesters, and motivation increased with the student’s age (p=0.0119). Suggestions for increasing motivation given by those who rated their motivation as ≤4 mainly focused on improvements in didactics and study organisation.

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