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  • 1.
    Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ekman, Inger
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Lindblad, Ulf
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Friberg, Febe
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Perceived symptoms in people living with Impaired Glucose Tolerance2011In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, p. Article ID 937038, 9 s.-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to identify symptoms in people with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and describe their experiences of living with the symptoms which they related to their condition. Twenty-one participants, from a cross-sectional population-based study, diagnosed as having IGT, were invited for an interview. The interviews were analyzed in two phases by means of a manifest and latent content analysis. The narratives included seven categories of symptoms (and more than 25 different symptoms) presented by the respondents. This study shows that symptoms such as the patient's own interpretation of different perceptions in the body must be considered, as well as signs and/or objective observations. Symptoms ought to be seen as complementary components in the health encounter and health conversation. The results of this study indicate that health professionals should increase their awareness of the balance between the implicit and the explicit bodily sensations that individuals communicate. Further studies are needed.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Karlsson, Veronika
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhattan, Sweden.
    Bennet, Louise
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Family Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fellbrant, Klas
    Family Medicine, Department of Primary Health Care, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hellgren, Margareta
    Institute of Medicine, Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Attitudes Regarding Participation in a Diabetes Screening Test among an Assyrian Immigrant Population in Sweden2016In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 1504530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immigrants from the Middle East have higher prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with native Swedes. The aim of the study was to describe and understand health beliefs in relation to T2D as well as attitudes regarding participation in a screening process in a local group of Assyrian immigrants living in Sweden. A qualitative and quantitative method was chosen in which 43 individuals participated in a health check-up and 13 agreed to be interviewed. Interviews were conducted, anthropometric measurements and blood tests were collected, and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. In total, 13 of the 43 participants were diagnosed with impaired glucose metabolism, 4 of these 13 had TD2. The interviewed participants perceived that screening was an opportunity to discover more about their health and to care for themselves and their families. Nevertheless, they were not necessarily committed to taking action as a consequence of the screening. Instead, they professed that their health was not solely in their own hands and that they felt safe that God would provide for them. Assyrians' background and religion affect their health beliefs and willingness to participate in screening for TD2.

  • 3.
    Huusko, Linda
    et al.
    Närhälsan Skövde Women's Health Clinic, Skövde, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Sandra
    Women's Health Clinic, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Hertfelt Wahn, Elisabeth
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    First-Time Fathers’ Experience of Support from Midwives in Maternity Clinics: An Interview Study2018In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 9618036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research shows that first-time fathers want to take part in preparation for birth and parenthood but they describe being excluded by health professionals. Aim: The aim of this study was to illustrate first-time fathers’ experiences of support from midwives in maternity clinics as a step in the validation of “The Father Perceived-Professional-Support” (The FaPPS) scale. Methods: A qualitative content analysis with an inductive and deductive approach was used; seven first-time fathers were strategically selected and interviewed. In the inductive part the following open question was asked: “How did you perceive the support from the antenatal midwife/midwives?” In the deductive part, the fathers were asked to respond to the FaPPS scale, in order to receive their thoughts and understanding of the scale, inspired by the “Think-aloud” method. Findings. The inductive results showed two main categories: Experience of not knowing what support they needed and Experience of being excluded. The fathers found support from other fathers in parental education classes, but they lack time to discuss. Overall it seems as if the fathers answered both from their own perspective and from the mothers’ perspective. This was not evident in the deductive results. The FaPPs scale should therefore include professionals’ ability to strengthen social support from other first-time fathers and professionals’ ability to offer support to the mother. Conclusion and Clinical Implications. The fathers experienced exclusion both by themselves and also by midwives. Midwives should offer both parents the opportunity to pose questions. It is important for expectant fathers that time for discussion is planned in parental education classes. The FaPPS scale is useful but needs further development. Parts of our result are in line with earlier research, for decades; therefore it is necessary to focus more on support for fathers.

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  • 4.
    Larsson, Inga E.
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhattan, Sweden.
    Sahlsten, Monika J. M.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions2016In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 1797014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses’ perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n=15). Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients’ best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers’ professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  • 5.
    Larsson, Inga E.
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Sahlsten, Monika J. M.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Segesten, Kerstin
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University College of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Plos, Kaety A. E.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patients' Perceptions of Nurses' Behaviour That Influence Patient Participation in Nursing Care: A Critical Incident Study2011In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 534060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient participation is an important basis for nursing care and medical treatment and is a legal right in many Western countries. Studies have established that patients consider participation to be both obvious and important, but there are also findings showing the opposite and patients often prefer a passive recipient role. Knowledge of what may influence patients' participation is thus of great importance. The aim was to identify incidents and nurses' behaviours that influence patients' participation in nursing care based on patients' experiences from inpatient somatic care. The Critical Incident Technique (CIT) was employed. Interviews were performed with patients (𝑛=17), recruited from somatic inpatient care at an internal medical clinic in West Sweden. This study provided a picture of incidents, nurses' behaviours that stimulate or inhibit patients' participation, and patient reactions on nurses' behaviours. Incidents took place during medical ward round, nursing ward round, information session, nursing documentation, drug administration, and meal.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Thorsell, Tina
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Sweden.
    Hertfelt Wahn, Elisabeth
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Factors influencing positive birth experiences of first-time mothers2013In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2013, article id 349124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to describe first-time mothers’ experiences and reflections of their first birth. Study Design. This study is a part of a larger study which was carried out in southwestern Sweden in 2008. A qualitative method with content analysis was chosen for this study. The unit of data was 14 written narratives from the first-time mothers. Results. The theme “To be empowered increases first-time mothers’ chances for a positive birth experience” crossed over into all the three categories: “To trust the body and to face the pain,” “Interaction between body and mind in giving birth,” and “Consistency of support.” Conclusion. In order to feel confident in their first childbirth, the women wanted to be confirmed and seen as unique individuals by the professionals and their partner. If professionals responded to the individual woman’s needs of support, the woman more often had a positive birth experience, even if the birth was protracted or with medical complications.

  • 7.
    Ranch, Matilda Möller
    et al.
    Neonatal Care Unit, NÄL Hospital Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jämtén, Sofia
    Pediatric Healthcare Setting, Capio, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette C.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Health Sciences, University West, Sweden.
    First-Time Mothers Have a Desire to Be Offered Professional Breastfeeding Support by Pediatric Nurses: An Evaluation of the Mother-Perceived-Professional Support Scale2019In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2019, article id 8731705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Although the World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for six months, the rate of breastfeeding has decreased worldwide. Breastfeeding is the natural way of feeding a baby, but it is a process that has to be learnt. It is not unusual for problems to occur and hence support for breastfeeding is vital. The aim of this study was to explore first-time mothers' experiences of the breastfeeding support offered by pediatric nurses, as well as to develop and evaluate the Mother Perceived Support from Professionals (MoPPS) scale. Methods. A qualitative design involving both inductive and deductive approaches was chosen. Nine first-time mothers were interviewed regarding their experiences of the breastfeeding support offered by pediatric nurses. Semistructured interviews were conducted. The mothers were also asked to grade their experiences of breastfeeding support on the MoPPS scale. A qualitative content analysis was applied when analyzing the data obtained using both the inductive (interviews) and deductive (MoPPS scale) approaches. Results. The results revealed that the mothers felt the desire to breastfeed, although they all experienced some difficulties. They wanted the pediatric nurses to be perceptive and provide professional support based on their own experiences. When the pediatric nurses took time and booked extra appointments, the mothers felt supported. The inductive analysis resulted in one theme: When wanting to breastfeed, mothers have a desire to be offered professional breastfeeding support. Two main categories were identified, namely Mothers wanted but lacked breastfeeding support and Mothers received professional support. The deductive analysis of the MoPPS scale showed similar results, and the questions were perceived as relevant to the aim. The mothers considered it important that the pediatric nurses had sufficient knowledge about breastfeeding. It was also considered important that the pediatric nurses involved the mothers' partners in the breastfeeding support. Therefore, we suggest that these areas should be included in the MoPPS scale for pediatric nurses. Conclusions. The MoPPS scale can be a useful tool for helping pediatric nurses to offer mothers professional breastfeeding support. Indeed, when offering breastfeeding support, pediatric nurses can use the items included on the MoPPS scale as guidance.

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  • 8.
    Thorsell, K. B. E.
    et al.
    Section of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden / Section of Elderly, Municipality of Hässleholm, Sweden.
    Nordström, B. M.
    Section of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen, Norway.
    Sivberg, B. V.
    Section of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Time in Care for Older People Living in Nursing Homes2010In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, p. Article ID 148435, 10 pages-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to measure actual care needs in relation to resources required to fulfill these needs, an instrument (Time in Care) with which to evaluate care needs and determine the time needed for various care activities has been developed with the aim of assessing nursing intensity in municipal care for older people. Interreliability (ICC=0.854) of time measurements (n = 10´546) of 32 nursing activities in relation to evaluated care levels in two nursing homes (staff n = 81) has been determined. Nursing intensity for both periods at the two nursing homes comprised on average a direct care time of 75 (45%) and 101 (42%) minutes, respectively. Work time was measured according to actual schedule (462 hours per nursing home during two weeks). Given that the need for care was high, one must further investigate if the quality of care the recipients received was sufficiently addressed.

  • 9.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hertfelt Wahn, Elisabeth
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Exploring Professional Support Offered by Midwives during Labour: An Observation and Interview Study2012In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2012, p. Article ID 648405-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Support in labour has an impact on the childbirth experience as well as on childbirth outcomes. Both social and professional support is needed. The aim of this study was to explore professional support offered by midwives during labour in relation to the supportive needs of the childbearing woman and her partner. The study used a qualitative, inductive design using triangulation, with observation followed by interviews. Seven midwives were observed when caring for seven women/couples in labour. After the observations, individual interviews with midwives, women, and their partners were conducted. Data were analysed using hermeneutical text interpretation. The results are presented with three themes. (1) Support as a professional task seems unclear and less well defined than medical controls. (2) Midwives and parents express somewhat different supportive ideas about how to create a sense of security. (3) Partner and midwife interact in support of the childbearing woman. The main interpretation shows that midwives' supportive role during labour could be understood as them mainly adopting the "with institution" ideology in contrast to the "with woman" ideology. This may increase the risk of childbearing women and their partners perceiving lack of support during labour. There is a need to increase efficiency by providing support for professionals to adopt the "with woman" ideology.

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  • 10.
    Vestman, C.
    et al.
    Department of Dialysis, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hasselroth, M.
    Department of Dialysis, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Freedom and Confinement: Patients' Experiences of Life with Home Haemodialysis2014In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 252643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic end stage renal disease need dialysis to survive; however, they also need a treatment that suits their life situation. It is important that healthcare providers provide reliable, up-to-date information about different dialysis treatment options. Since home haemodialysis is a relatively new treatment, it is necessary to gather more knowledge about what the treatment entails from the patient’s perspective. The aim of this study was to describe patients’ experiences of having home haemodialysis. To gain access to the patients’ experiences, they were asked to write narratives, which describe both their good and bad experiences of life with the treatment. The narratives were analysed with a qualitative method. The results of this analysis are subdivided into five themes: freedom to be at home and control their own treatment, feeling of being alone with the responsibility, changes in the home environment, need for support, and security and well-being with home haemodialysis. The conclusion is that home haemodialysis provides a certain level of freedom, but the freedom is limited as the treatment itself is restrictive. In order to improve patients’ experiences with home haemodialysis, more research based on patients’ experiences is needed and it is necessary to involve the patients in the development of the care.

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