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  • 1.
    Asp, Julia
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Clin Chem & Transfus Med, Inst Biomed, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Synnergren, Jane
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Jonsson, Marianne
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Clin Chem & Transfus Med, Inst Biomed, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Dellgren, Goran
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden / Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jeppsson, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden / Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Comparison of human cardiac gene expression profiles in paired samples of right atrium and left ventricle collected in vivo2012In: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 89-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Asp J, Synnergren J, Jonsson M, Dellgren G, Jeppsson A. Comparison of human cardiac gene expression profiles in paired samples of right atrium and left ventricle collected in vivo. Physiol Genomics 44: 89-98, 2012. First published November 15, 2011; doi: 10.1152/physiolgenomics.00137.2011.-Studies of expressed genes in human heart provide insight into both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. This is of importance for extended understanding of cardiac function as well as development of new therapeutic drugs. Heart tissue for gene expression studies is generally hard to obtain, particularly from the ventricles. Since different parts of the heart have different functions, expression profiles should likely differ between these parts. The aim of the study was therefore to compare the global gene expression in cardiac tissue from the more accessible auricula of the right atrium to expression in tissue from the left ventricle. Tissue samples were collected from five men undergoing aortic valve replacement or coronary artery bypass grafting. Global gene expression analysis identified 542 genes as differentially expressed between the samples extracted from these two locations, corresponding to similar to 2% of the genes covered by the microarray; 416 genes were identified as abundantly expressed in right atrium, and 126 genes were abundantly expressed in left ventricle. Further analysis of the differentially expressed genes according to available annotations, information from curated pathways and known protein interactions, showed that genes with higher expression in the ventricle were mainly associated with contractile work of the heart. Transcription in biopsies from the auricula of the right atrium on the other hand indicated a wider area of functions, including immunity and defense. In conclusion, our results suggest that biopsies from the auricula of the right atrium may be suitable for various genetic studies, but not studies directly related to muscle work.

  • 2.
    Ghosheh, Nidal
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Küppers-Munther, Barbara
    Takara Bio Europe Aktiebolaget, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Asplund, Annika
    Takara Bio Europe Aktiebolaget, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Edsbagge, Josefina
    Takara Bio Europe Aktiebolaget, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ulfenborg, Benjamin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Andersson, Tommy B.
    Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden / Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Section of Pharmacogenetics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björquist, Petter
    NovaHep Aktiebolaget, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Christian X.
    Takara Bio Europe Aktiebolaget, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carén, Helena
    Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simonsson, Stina
    Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. AstraZeneca Research and Development, Global Medicines Development Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Global Medicines Development Unit, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Comparative transcriptomics of hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells and adult human liver tissue2017In: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 430-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-HEP) have the potential to replace presently used hepatocyte sources applied in liver disease treatment and models of drug discovery and development. Established hepatocyte differentiation protocols are effective and generate hepatocytes, which recapitulate some key features of their in vivo counterparts. However, generating mature hPSC-HEP remains a challenge. In this study, we applied transcriptomics to investigate the progress of in vitro hepatic differentiation of hPSCs at the developmental stages, definitive endoderm, hepatoblasts, early hPSC-HEP, and mature hPSC-HEP, to identify functional targets that enhance efficient hepatocyte differentiation. Using functional annotation, pathway and protein interaction network analyses, we observed the grouping of differentially expressed genes in specific clusters representing typical developmental stages of hepatic differentiation. In addition, we identified hub proteins and modules that were involved in the cell cycle process at early differentiation stages. We also identified hub proteins that differed in expression levels between hPSC-HEP and the liver tissue controls. Moreover, we identified a module of genes that were expressed at higher levels in the liver tissue samples than in the hPSC-HEP. Considering that hub proteins and modules generally are essential and have important roles in the protein-protein interactions, further investigation of these genes and their regulators may contribute to a better understanding of the differentiation process. This may suggest novel target pathways and molecules for improvement of hPSC-HEP functionality, having the potential to finally bring this technology to a wider use.

  • 3.
    Holmgren, Gustav
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ghosheh, Nidal
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Chemistry/Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zeng, Xianmin
    Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Buck Institute, Novato, California, USA.
    Bogestål, Yalda
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. AstraZeneca Research and Development, Global Medicines Development, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Global Medicines Development Unit, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Identification of stable reference genes in differentiating human pluripotent stem cells2015In: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 232-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reference genes, often referred to as housekeeping genes (HKGs), are frequently used to normalize gene expression data based on the assumption that they are expressed at a constant level in the cells. However, several studies have shown that there may be a large variability in the gene expression levels of HKGs in various cell types. In a previous study, employing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) subjected to spontaneous differentiation, we observed that the expression of commonly used HKG varied to a degree that rendered them inappropriate to use as reference genes under those experimental settings. Here we present a substantially extended study of the HKG signature in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC), including nine global gene expression datasets from both hESC and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), obtained during directed differentiation towards endoderm-, mesoderm-, and ectoderm derivatives. Sets of stably expressed genes were compiled and a handful of genes (e.g., EID2, ZNF324B, CAPN10, and RABEP2) were identified as generally applicable reference genes in hPSCs across all cell lines and experimental conditions. The stability in gene expression profiles was confirmed by quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis. Taken together, the current results suggest that differentiating hPSCs have a distinct HKG signature, which in some aspects is different from somatic cell types, and underscore the necessity to validate the stability of reference genes under the actual experimental setup used. In addition, the novel putative HKGs identified in this study can preferentially be used for normalization of gene expression data obtained from differentiating hPSCs.

  • 4.
    Synnergren, Jane
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Chemistry/Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Ameen, Caroline
    Cellartis, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jansson, Andreas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Sartipy, Peter
    Cellartis, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Global transcriptional profiling reveals similarities and differences between human stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters and heart tissue2012In: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 245-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is now well documented that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can differentiate into functional cardiomyocytes. These cells constitute a promising source of material for use in drug development, toxicity testing, and regenerative medicine. To assess their utility as replacement or complement to existing models, extensive phenotypic characterization of the cells is required. In the present study, we used microarrays and analyzed the global transcription of hESC-derived cardiomyocyte clusters (CMCs) and determined similarities as well as differences compared with reference samples from fetal and adult heart tissue. In addition, we performed a focused analysis of the expression of cardiac ion channels and genes involved in the Ca2+-handling machinery, which in previous studies have been shown to be immature in stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Our results show that hESC-derived CMCs, on a global level, have a highly similar gene expression profile compared with human heart tissue, and their transcriptional phenotype was more similar to fetal than to adult heart. Despite the high similarity to heart tissue, a number of significantly differentially expressed genes were identified, providing some clues toward understanding the molecular difference between in vivo sourced tissue and stem cell derivatives generated in vitro. Interestingly, some of the cardiacrelated ion channels and Ca2+-handling genes showed differential expression between the CMCs and heart tissues. These genes may represent candidates for future genetic engineering to create hESC-derived CMCs that better mimic the phenotype of the cardiomyocytes present in the adult human heart.

  • 5.
    Synnergren, Jane
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Améen, Caroline
    Cellartis, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Anders
    Dept of Clinical Chemistry/Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Sartipy, Peter
    Cellartis, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Expression of microRNAs and their target mRNAs in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters and in heart tissue2011In: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 581-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) act as posttranscriptional regulators and that they play important roles during heart development and in cardiac function. Thus, they may provide new means of altering stem cell fate and differentiation processes. However, information about the correlation between global miRNA and mRNA expression in cardiomyocyte clusters (CMCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and in fetal and adult heart tissue is lacking. In the present study the global miRNA and mRNA expression in hESC-derived CMCs and in fetal and adult heart tissue was investigated in parallel using microarrays. Target genes for the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using computational methods, and the concordance in miRNA expression and mRNA levels of potential target genes was determined across the experimental samples. The biology of the predicted target genes was further explored regarding their molecular functions and involvement in known regulatory pathways. A clear correlation between the global miRNA expression and corresponding target mRNA expression was observed. Using three different sources of cardiac tissue-like samples, we defined the similarities between in vitro hESC-derived CMCs and their in vivo counterparts. The results are in line with previously reported observations that miRNAs repress mRNA expression and additionally identify a number of novel miRNAs with potential important roles in human cardiac tissue. The concordant miRNA expression pattern observed among all the cardiac tissue-like samples analyzed here provide a starting point for future ambitious studies aiming towards assessment of the functional roles of specific miRNAs during cardiomyocyte differentiation.

  • 6.
    Synnergren, Jane
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Drowley, Lauren
    Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Plowright, Alleyn T.
    Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Brolén, Gabriella
    Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Goumans, Marie-Josè
    Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.
    Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Global Medicines Development Unit, AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wang, Qing-Dong
    Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Comparative transcriptomic analysis identifies genes differentially expressed in human epicardial progenitors and hiPSC-derived cardiac progenitors2016In: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 48, no 11, p. 771-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparative transcriptomic analysis identifies genes differentially expressed in human epicardial progenitor cells and hiPSC-derived cardiac progenitor cells: effects of hypoxic vs normoxic culture conditions.

1 - 6 of 6
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