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  • 1.
    Molassiotis, Alexander
    et al.
    School of Nursing, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Margulies, Anita
    University Hospital Zürich, Klinik und Poliklinik für Onkologie, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Fernandez-Ortega, Paz
    Institut Català Oncologia ICO, Barcelona, Spain.
    Pud, Dorit
    Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Panteli, Vassiliki
    Greek Oncology Nursing Society, Athens, Greece.
    Bruyns, Ingrid
    Belgian Society of Oncology Nursing, Brussels, Belgium.
    Scott, Julia A.
    Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland.
    Gudmundsdottir, Gudbjorg
    Department of Oncology, Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Browall, Maria
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Madsen, Elin
    Oncology Department, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Ozden, Gulten
    Gazi University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
    Magri, Miriam
    Università degli Studi di Milano-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Selvekerova, Sarka
    Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Platin, Nurgun
    School of Health Sciences, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Kearney, Nora
    Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland.
    Patiraki, Elisabeth
    Greek Oncology Nursing Society, Athens, Greece.
    Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with haematological malignancies in Europe2005In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 105-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports upon a descriptive cross-sectional survey assessing the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with haematological cancers. Twelve European countries contributed data from patients with haematological cancers, as part of a larger study. Sixty-eight patients with haematological cancer participated. Among the participants, 26.5% used some form of CAM after the cancer diagnosis. The most common therapies used were homeopathy (38.9%), herbal medicine (22.2%) various psychic therapies, such as use of mediums, healers, rebirthing or past life regression therapy (22.2%). A particular profile of a CAM user was not evident in the sample. Moderate levels of satisfaction with CAM were reported. Patients commonly used CAM to increase the ability of their body to fight cancer and to improve physical and emotional well-being. Information about CAM was received mainly from friends or family. As CAM use in patients with haematological malignancies is common, clinicians should assist patients who want to use CAM to make an appropriate decision, and improve communication with them about CAM use in an open and non-judgemental dialogue. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Molassiotis, Alexander
    et al.
    a School of Nursing, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Panteli, Vassiliki
    Greek Oncology Nursing Society, Athens, Greece.
    Patiraki, Elisabeth
    Greek Oncology Nursing Society, Athens, Greece.
    Ozden, Gulten
    Gazi University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
    Platin, Nurgun
    School of Health Sciences, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Madsen, Elin
    Oncology Department, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Browall, Maria
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fernandez-Ortega, Paz
    Institut Català Oncologia ICO, Barcelona, Spain.
    Pud, Dorit
    Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Margulies, Anita
    University Hospital Zürich, Klinik und Poliklinik für Onkologie, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Complementary and alternative medicine use in lung cancer patients in eight European countries2006In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 34-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents findings from a cross-sectional survey about the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with lung cancer, forming part of a larger study. Data from 111 lung cancer patients in 8 countries in Europe were collected through a descriptive 27-item questionnaire. The data suggest that 23.6% of the lung cancer patients used CAM after the diagnosis with cancer. The most popular CAM modalities were herbal medicine (48.1%), medicinal teas (11.5%), homeopathy (11.5%), use of animal extracts (11.5%) and spiritual therapies (11.5%). Herbal use increased by three times after the diagnosis of cancer. Patients seemed quite satisfied with the CAM used. They were also spending on average about 142 Euros monthly on CAM therapies or remedies. The most common motivation to use CAM was to increase the body's ability to fight the cancer. Main sources of information about CAM were friends and family. As CAM is increasingly used by patients with lung cancer, it is important to be able to assist patients make an appropriate decision by discussing the issue of CAM openly, providing reassurance and communicating safe and appropriate information to patients. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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