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  • 1.
    Alklind Taylor, Anna-Sofia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för kommunikation och information. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Informationsteknologi.
    Backlund, Per
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för kommunikation och information. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Informationsteknologi.
    Niklasson, Lars
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för kommunikation och information. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Informationsteknologi.
    The Coaching Cycle: A Coaching-by-Gaming Approach in Serious Games2012Inngår i: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 43, nr 5, s. 648-672Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Military organizations have a long history of using simulations, role-play, and games for training. This also encompasses good practices concerning how instructors utilize games and gaming behavior. Unfortunately, the work of instructors is rarely described explicitly in research relating to serious gaming. Decision makers also tend to have overconfidence in the pedagogical power of games and simulations, particularly where the instructor is taken out of the gaming loop. The authors propose a framework, the coaching cycle, that focuses on the roles of instructors. The roles include instructors acting as game players. The fact that the instructors take a more active part in all training activities will further improve learning. The coaching cycle integrates theories of experiential learning (where action precedes theory) and deliberate practice (where the trainee's skill is constantly challenged by a coach). Incorporating a coaching-by-gaming perspective complicates, but also strengthens, the player-centered design approach to game development in that we need to take into account two different types of players: trainees and instructor. Furthermore, the authors argue that the coaching cycle allows for a shift of focus to a more thorough debriefing, because it implies that learning of theoretical material before simulation/game playing is kept to a minimum. This shift will increase the transfer of knowledge.

  • 2.
    Backlund, Per
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för kommunikation och information. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Virtuella system.
    Engström, Henrik
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för kommunikation och information. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Virtuella system.
    Johannesson, Mikael
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för kommunikation och information. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Virtuella system.
    Lebram, Mikael
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för kommunikation och information. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Virtuella system.
    Games for traffic education: An experimental study of a game-based driving simulator2010Inngår i: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 41, nr 2, s. 145-169Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the authors report on the construction and evaluation of a game-based driving simulator using a real car as a joystick. The simulator is constructed from off-the-shelf hardware and the simulation runs on open-source software. The feasibility of the simulator as a learning tool has been experimentally evaluated. Results are reported from an experimental study of games and traffic safety performed in an advanced gaming environment. During car simulator sessions, the authors collected data about different traffic safety variables, such as speed, headway distance, and lane change behavior, from 70 participants. The data were analyzed to investigate possible individual learning effects and differences between groupings of participants. The experiment shows clear, positive, individual learning effects for all traffic safety variables analyzed. The authors also made a qualitative analysis of the participants’ perception of the simulator as a learning tool. From the results, it is concluded that a game-based simulation can be used to enhance learning in driving education.

  • 3.
    Backlund, Per
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Informationsteknologi.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Engström, Henrik
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Informationsteknologi.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lebram, Mikael
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Informationsteknologi.
    Breaking Out of the Bubble Putting Simulation Into Context to Increase Immersion and Performance2018Inngår i: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 49, nr 6, s. 642-660Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Simulation based training with full-size mannequins is a prominent means of training within the healthcare sector. Prehospital missions include all parts of the healthcare process which take place before a patient is handed over to the receiving hospital. This implies that the context for prehospital care is varied and potentially challenging or dangerous in several ways. In this article we present a study which explores immersion and performance by emergency medical services (EMS) professionals in in a training situation which takes the specifics of prehospital interventions into account.

    Methods. The study was carried out as a field experiment at an ambulance unit. The experiment was designed to compare the differences between two types of medical scenarios: basic and contextualized. We analyzed the levels of immersion throughout the scenarios and then team performance was evaluated by independent experts. Both analyses were made by observing video recordings from multiple camera angles with a custom made analysis tool.

    Results. Our results show that the contextualization of a medical scenario increases both immersion as measured by the Immersion Score Rating Instrument (ISRI) and team performance as measured by the Global Rating Scale (GRS). The overall ISRI score was higher in the contextualized condition as compared to the basic condition, with an average team wise difference of 2.94 (sd = 1.45). This difference is significant using a paired, two-tailed t-test (p<.001). The GRS score was higher for overall clinical performance in the contextualized scenario with an average team wise difference of 0.83 (sd = 0.83, p=.005).

    Conclusions. Full-size mannequin simulation based training for EMS professionals may be enhanced by contextualizing the medical scenarios. The main benefits are that the contextualized scenarios better take prehospital medical challenges into account and allow participants to perform better.

  • 4.
    Linderoth, Jonas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Informationsteknologi. Swedish Defence University, Wargaming Section.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Being an Educator and Game Developer: The Role of Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Non-Commercial Serious Games Production2019Inngår i: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 50, nr 6, s. 771-788Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim. Previous literature has discussed tensions between the field of game design and the field of education. It has been emphasized that it is important to address this tension when developing game based learning (GBL). In order to find potential ways of approaching this problem, we investigate the development of GBL when performed by those who have both pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and experience in game development. Method. Two case studies about serious games production were conducted, a game section at a national defense college and a university course in educational game design. The cases, as well as individual development projects within the settings, were analyzed with a focus on the role of PCK during serious games development. Results. While the developers and instructors at the defence college, who designed games for their in-house needs, had both PCK and knowledge about game development, these competencies varied a lot among the participants at the university course. The results show that educational goals added complexity to the design process. By comparison, some studied game projects at the university course avoided this complexity. These projects legitimized their games as educational by suggesting unproven far transfer. In other cases, where the developers did have PCK, the instructional goals where taken as a starting point that guided the whole development process. This lead to games that were designed to match highly specific educational contexts. The developers, instructors and teachers in both of the settings who used their PCK tended to break a number of established game design heuristics that would have been counter productive in relation to the learning objectives of the games. Conclusions. The paper suggests that there is a need for people with pedagogical content knowledge AND knowledge about game development. Enhancing these dual competencies in game workers could forward the field of GBL.

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