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  • 1.
    Ali, Muhammad
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS USINGBIOLAYOUT, GENENET AND DAVID2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Deriving clusters of genes by different clustering techniques or finding the statistically significant variations among genes are conventional approaches to study microarray expression data. Nowadays in vitro experiments are being considered to make applications of genetical genomics more widespread in non-model species. Different bioinformatics tools are being used to investigate genetic pathways in the form of correlation based networks. In this study, a comparison was made between in vivo and in vitro gene expression data by using two software: BioLayout and GeneNet. From ten mice, five mice with the wild-type allele and five mice with the gene knock out (KO) for the gene SOCS2, a total of twenty samples were taken: five fresh samples from wildtype mice, five fresh samples from KO mice, five cultured samples from wildtype mice and five cultured samples from KO mice. After obtaining differentially expressed genes from microarray cDNA experiments, network analysis was done using the software BioLayout and GeneNet to make correlation and partial-correlation based networks. The resulting networks, or clusters derived from the networks, were subsequently analyzed for gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) using the tool DAVID. The results from the GSEA were used to compare all the clusters and networks between the fresh and cultured samples to test for functional overlap. The GSEA results were also used to compare the clusters from BioLayout with the networks from GeneNet to compare overlap between these tools using the same data. When functional enrichment analysis and comparisons were made between the fresh and cultured data set after getting the networks and clusters from BioLayout and GeneNet, only a few functional categories were found in common. This suggested that in vitro samples are unable to give the same biological information as in vivo samples for this particular gene KO. Also the two different network tools showed only limited overlap, suggesting that the correlation based networks from BioLayout show a different type of relationship among the genes than the partial correlations from GeneNet.

    Therefore, the use of different network tools can be recommended to visualize and explore the regulatory pathways among genes.

  • 2.
    Almqvist, Gustaf
    et al.
    University of Stockholm, Stockholm Sweden.
    Andersen, Michael
    Danish Fishermen’s Association, Fredericia, Denmark.
    Willestofte Berg, Casper
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Broadgate, Wendy
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bryan, Meaghan
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, United States.
    Campana, Steven
    Fisheries and Oceans Canada Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Canada.
    Cardinale, Max
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Dierking, Jan
    Leibniz-Institut für Meereswissenschaften, Kiel, Germany.
    von Dorrien, Christian
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Efimov, Yuri
    Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries & Oceanography (VNIRO), Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Department of Inland Fisheries, Silkeborg, Denmark.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Hüssy, Karin
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Johansson, Reine
    Baltic Sea Advisory Council, Dyrön, Sweden.
    Jonusas, Stanislovas
    DGMare, Brussels, Belgium.
    Kornelius, George
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR) 8 Daugavgrivas Str. Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Köster, Fritz
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Kraak, Sarah
    Thünen Institute, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Large, Scott
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Larsson, Staffan
    Swedish Cod Fishermen’s Producer Organisation, Lycke, Sweden.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Maguire, Jean-Jacques
    Godefroy, Quebec, Canada.
    Mosegaard, Henrik
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Anders
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Stepputtis, Daniel
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Stern, Edward
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Strehlow, Harry Vincent
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Svedäng, Henrik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Trenkel, Verena
    Ifremer Nantes Centre, Nantes, France.
    Wæver Pedersen, Martin
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Zimmermann, Christopher
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Cod Stocks (WKBALTCOD)2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Cod Stocks (WKBALTCOD), chaired by External Chair Jean-Jacques Maguire, Canada and ICES Chair Marie Storr-Paulsen, Denmark, and attended by two invited external experts Verena Trenkel, France and Meaghan Bryan, USA met in Rostock, Germany, 2–6 March 2015 with 39 participants and six countries represented. The objective of WKBALTCOD was to evaluate the appropriateness of data and methods to determine stock status and investigate meth-ods appropriate to use in the single-stock assessment for the cod stock in SD 22–24 and cod in SD 25–32 in the Baltic. Participants in the workshop were a large group with diverse backgrounds representing the industry, fisheries, NGOs, managers and scientists.The single-stock analytic assessment of the eastern Baltic stock was not accepted by the assessment working group (WGBFAS) in 2014 due to severe problems with the input data. The advice for the eastern Baltic cod was, therefore, based on the ICES approach for data-limited stocks. As an outcome ICES decided to establish a bench-mark for both cod stocks and to scope an integrated assessment for the Baltic cod stocks. The first meeting (WKSIBCA) was therefore meant to introduce the interces-sional work conducted since the assessment working group in April 2014, and to reach some conclusions on how to proceed both in the short term (Benchmark in March 2015) and longer term (2–3 years) and was seen as a data compilation work-shop, there is produced a separate report from this workshop. The WKBALTCOD was the 2nd meeting in the benchmark process and was intended to come up with a final stock assessment method, stock annex and input data for both stocks. As it was not possible to reach conclusive decision on the final model to be used for the east Baltic cod stock during the benchmark meeting and as more work on the preferable models was needed, it was decided by the ACOM leadership to prolong the bench-mark process until the assessment working group meeting in April 2015. This deci-sion has led to a relatively long process partly mixed with the assessment working group WGBFAS.It became clear during the benchmark process that although large effort has been put into explaining the underlying processes leading to the changes in the Baltic ecosys-tem, there is still some lack of understanding of the present situation in the eastern Baltic cod stock. Therefore, it was not possible to reach firm conclusions on the final model to be used and therefore not possible to set reference points. It was decided to continue to explore the most promising models and to continue to improve the input data until the assessment working group started in April.The main challenges still to be solved for the Eastern Baltic cod stock is the quantifi-cation of increased natural mortality and decrease in growth. Through several presentations during the workshop (both WKSIBCA and WKBALTCOD) it became clear that natural mortality very likely has increased in later years, due to decreased condition and increased parasite infection. A decrease in growth also seems plausible duo to a decrease in condition and/or selectivity-induced mortality of the largest in-dividuals. However, as none of these parameters are easily estimated, especially with the severe ageing problems, different model assumptions made the output very shaky.For the western Baltic cod, stock identification issues were examined in area SD 24, the intermediate area: based on otolith characteristics and genetics. Due to the results showing a large proportion of east cod in this area, it was decided to split the catch2 | ICES WKBALTCOD REPORT 2015and survey from SD 24 into either the western or eastern Baltic cod stock. It was pos-sible to derive proportions of eastern and western cod in SD 24 back to the mid-1990s.For the western Baltic cod stock a modelled survey indices was included in the as-sessment covering the western part of SD 24 and Area 22+23 and based on a smoothed ALK.Both cod stocks have in the past used commercial tuning fleet to have a better cov-ered of older age groups. It was decided to abound this time-series duo quality issues such as a limited coverage and problems with technical creeping.WKBALTCOD was not able to explore and define reference points for the Western Baltic cod stock during the meeting due to time constraints, but these were calculated and decided by correspondence after the meeting. The recent protocols on estimation procedures developed by WKMSYREF3 for stocks with a full analytical assessment and for data-limited stocks served as objective guidelines to obtain reference point estimates.

  • 3.
    Andersen, Michael
    et al.
    Danish Fishermen’s Association Fredericia, Denmark.
    Arula, Timo
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Clink, Sally
    Baltic Sea Regional Advisory Council, Denmark.
    Collie, Jeremy
    University of Rhode Island, USA.
    Eckeskog, Magnus
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Sweden.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Pehr E.
    Swedish Fisherman’s Federation Fiskets Hus, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Russian Federation.
    Gröhsler, Thomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Poland.
    Howell, Daniel
    Institute of Marine Research, Norway.
    Jepsena, Ilona
    European Commission, Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Belgium.
    Johansson, Reine J.
    Swedish Fishermen´s Federation, Sweden.
    Janusas, Stanislovas
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Belgium.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Russian Federation.
    Klaas, Kunnar
    Ministry of the Environment of Estonia, Estonia.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thûnen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Linke, Sebastian
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish Unniversity of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Poland.
    Maguire, Jean-Jacques
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Canada.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Plaganyi, Eva
    CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR), Australia.
    Plikshs, Maris
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Reeves, Stuart
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries , Belgium.
    Rindorf, Anna
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Storr- Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Strehlow, Harry V.
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Vinther, Morten
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Multispecies Assessments (WKBALT): 4–8 February 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark2013Report (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Aps, R.
    et al.
    University of Tartu.
    Fetissov, M.
    University of Tartu.
    Holmgren, Noel
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Kuikka, S.
    University of Helsinki.
    Central Baltic Sea herring: effect of environmental trends and fishery management2011In: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development VIII / [ed] Y. Villacampa & C. A. Brebbia, Southampton: WIT Press, 2011, p. 69-80Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertainty is an endemic condition of the Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus membras, L) fishery management. It is a condition exacerbated by the fishing fleet overcapacity and consequent exploitation of the herring stock at a level believed to be unsustainable. Some sources of uncertainty are mainly related to biology and fishing technique: the unsolved problem of herring assessment and management units, the recruitment–environment relationship and the reduction in mean weights-at-age, uncertain ageing of fish, the problem of unaccounted fishing mortality caused by the fish selection through the trawl net. Fishing fleet overcapacity is believed to be behind of the regulatory overfishing when setting the Total Allowable Catches (TACs) higher than the scientific advice (decision overfishing) and tolerating the extensive underreporting of catches (implementation overfishing). Two scenarios for the Central Baltic Sea herring fishery management options are constructed and the Bayesian networks are used to represent and update uncertainties encountered in the process of the management related situation assessment. First scenario represents the current status of the fishery management resulting in fishing mortality (F) higher than FMSY – the fishing mortality that corresponds to the Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). The second scenario demonstrates the assumed potential impact of economic incentives (e.g.zoning, individual transferable quotas (ITQs), territorial use rights etc.) on the reduction of excessive fishing capacity and bringing actual fishing mortality closer to FMSY.

  • 5.
    Arvidsson, D.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Clin Nutr, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Slinde, Frode
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Larsson, S.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Internal Med Respirat Med & Allergology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hulthén, L.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Clin Nutr, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Energy cost of physical activities in children: Validation of SenseWear Armband2007In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 39, no 11, p. 2076-2084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To examine the validity of SenseWear Pro2 Armband in assessing energy cost of physical activities in children, and to contribute with values of energy costs in an overview of physical activities in children. METHODS: Energy cost was assessed by SenseWear Pro2 Armband in 20 healthy children, 11-13 yr, while lying down resting, sitting playing games on mobile phone, stepping up and down on a step board, bicycling on a stationary bike, jumping on a trampoline, playing basketball, and walking/running on a treadmill at the speeds 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10 km x h(-1). During these activities, energy cost was also assessed from VO2 and VCO2 measured by Oxycon Mobile portable metabolic system, which was used as criterion method. RESULTS: The difference in energy cost between SenseWear Pro2 Armband and Oxycon Mobile was -0.7 (0.5) (P < 0.001) for resting, -2.0 (0.9) (P < 0.001) for playing games on mobile phone, -6.6 (2.3) (P < 0.001) for stepping on the step board, -12.0 (3.7) (P < 0.001) for bicycling, -2.7 (11.9) (P = 0.34) for jumping on the trampoline, and -14.8 (6.4) kJ x min(-1) (P < 0.001) for playing basketball. The difference in energy cost between SenseWear Pro2 Armband and Oxycon Mobile for increasing treadmill speed was 1.3 (3.1) (P = 0.048), 0.1 (2.9) (P = 0.82), -1.2 (2.6) (P = 0.049), -1.6 (3.2) (P = 0.044), -3.1 (3.7) (P = 0.0013), -4.9 (3.7) (P < 0.001), -5.3 (3.7) (P < 0.001), and -11.1 (3.5) kJ x min(-1) (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: SenseWear Pro2 Armband underestimated energy cost of most activities in this study, an underestimation that increased with increased physical activity intensity. A table of energy costs (MET values) of physical activities in children measured by indirect calorimetry is presented as an initiation of the creation of a compendium of physical activities in children

  • 6.
    Badekar, Karishma
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Cloning of two arsenic reponsive arsB and arsC genes from Lysinibacillus sphaericus and construction of binary vectors for T-DNA mediated transformation of tobacco plants.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic is classified to be a heavy metal that severely contaminates human foods, drinking water and the environment in many regions of the world. Long term exposure to arsenic can create chronic poisoning of human health leading to many life threatening and lethal diseases such as cancer, keratosis, gangrene, damage of lung, kidney and liver and also many other neuro vascular disorders.

    To cope with this problem, the researchers of the Biotechnology Research group at the University of Skövde has previously identified and isolated a bacterial strain Lysinibacillus sphaericus sp. B1-CDA from arsenic contaminated soil. These strains are resistant to arsenic, can uptake arsenic from the contaminated source and store it inside the cells thus reducing the arsenic content in the contaminated source. Genome sequencing of this strain revealed that the bacterium harbors several arsenic responsive genes. The research group has also performed several in silico studies on these genes to determine their molecular functions. Two of these genes arsB and arsC were predicted to be involved in uptake and storage of arsenics inside the cells. In this thesis work the arsB and arsC genes were cloned from the genomic DNA of bacterium by PCR using database sequences as primers. These genes were then transferred into two cloning vectors pMAN1080 and pMAN0385, respectively. The pCAMBIA1301 vector was utilized to construct the binary vectors for transferring these genes to tobacco plants by using Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA mediated gene transfer. Two binary vectors each harboring the respective arsenic responsive genes arsB and arsC were successfully constructed. Transgenic calli derived from leaf disk transformation were successfully selected. Transgenic shoots were generated but with a very low transformation frequency (<6%).

  • 7.
    Beniamin, Armanos
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Establishment of an Expression and Purification System for Plasmodium falciparum Multi Drug Resistance (pfmdr) Transporter2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria is a life threatening parasite disease caused and transmitted by infected female anopheles mosquito. However, the parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, has become resistant to most anti malarial drugs, such as chloroquine, which contributes to fever and anaemia because of its ability to digest the haemoglobin in the red blood cells. The aims of this project were to establish whether “Bac to Bac” Baculoviral Expression System is suitable for expression of pfmdr 1 gene and for purification of the pgh 1 protein. The pfmdr 1 gene encodes an ABC transporter protein, pgh 1, fixed in the cell membrane of the Plasmodium falciparuum gut, which assist in elimination of drug compounds. Furthermore, “Bac to Bac” Baculoviral Expression System uses vectors with histidine tags to clone the pfmdr 1 gene and subsequently transform these into DH10Bac cells to produce the recombinant bacmid DNA. Since pfmdr 1 gene is an AT-rich sequence, PCR was optimized, by lowering the annealing and extension temperature to 47Co and 66Co respectively. The results show that “Bac to Bac” Baculoviral Expression System can be used to express the pfmdr 1 gene, though further experiments has to be performed.

  • 8.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Boje, Jesper
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Degel, Henrik
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Eero, Margit
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Management Systems, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Grygiel, Wlodzimierz
    Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Sweden.
    Horbowy, Jan
    Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Karpushevskaia, Anastasiia
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Latvian Fish Resources Agency, Riga, Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research, Institute Kotka Unit, Kotka, Finland.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute Turku Game and Fisheries Research, Turku, Finland.
    Statkus, Romas
    Division of fishery research and science, Fishery service under Ministry of Agriculture, Klaipeda, Lithuania.
    Stoetera, Sven
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Report of the Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS): 14-21 April 2015, ICES HQ, Copenhagen, Denmark2015Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS) met 14-21 April 2015 (Chair: Mare Storr-Paulsen, Denmark), with 28 participants and 9 countries represented. The objective of WGBFAS was to assess the status of the following stocks:

    1 ) Sole in Division IIIa, SDs 20-22

    2 ) Cod in Kattegat, Cod in SD 22-24, Cod in SD 25-32

    3 ) Herring in SD 25-27, 28.2, 29 and 32, Herring in SD 28.1 (Gulf of Riga), Herring in SD 30, Herring SD 31.

    4 ) Sprat in SD 22-32

    5 ) Plaice 21-23, Plaice 2425

    6 ) Flounder 22-23; 24-25; 26+28 and 27+29-32, Brill 2232, Dab 2232, and Turbot 2232 (survey trends)

    WGBFAS also identified the data needed, for next year’s data call with some suggestions for improvements in the data call as well as in InterCatch. The report contains an introduction with the summary of other WGs relevant for the WGBFAS, country specific fishery description, the methods used, and ecosystem considerations. The results of the analytical stock assessment or survey trends for the species listed above are then presented with all the stocks with the same species in the same sections. The report ends with references, list of Working Documents, recommendations and Stock Annexes. In first quarter 2015 the Baltic cod stocks and the plaice stocks were benchmarked. As a result the Baltic cod stocks now have to apply a splitting key in SD 24 were both stocks are present. This has changed the assessment from being an area based assessment to now being a stock based assessments and has implications for the advice. The principle analytical models used for the stock assessments were XSA and SAM. For most flatfishes, CPUE trends from bottom trawl surveys were presented (except plaice 2425 and her31 using relative SSB from SAM and XSA, respectively). Ecosystem changes have been analytically considered in the following stock assessments: Herring in SD 25-27, 28.2, 29 and 32, and Sprat in SD 22-32, in form of cod predation mortality. Last year a very large retrospective pattern in the Eastern Baltic cod stock caused that the WG rejected the analytic assessment. Several uncertainties in the data lead to this conclusion i.a age reading problems with large inconsistency between and within nations as well as a change in growth and natural mortality. However, even though a data compilation workshop and a benchmark have been conducted in the intermediate time it was not possible to solve the main issue on growth. The lack of knowledge on growth caused to that even the length based data required in the data call was very uncertain for the models and in the end the WG was not able to produce a better model than was presented last year which is based on survey trends. The Her-30 (Herring in the Botnian Sea) was by the working group down scaled from a category 1 stock to a category 3 stock due to the commercial tuning fleet used in the assessment having very uncertain estimates in the last couples of years. However, during the Baltic ADG an alternative assessment was suggested were the stock is still considered a category 1 stock but the last 8 years of the commercial tuning fleet was terminated. This assessment was conducted after the working group but has been included in the report.

  • 9.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Cadigan, Noel
    Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Johann-Heinrich von Thünen-Institute, Germany .
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Morgado, Cristina
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Denmark.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Trenkel, Verena
    Ifremer Nantes Centre, France.
    Report of the Inter-Benchmark Protocol for Herring in Subdivision 30 (IBP Her30): 11–15 March 2013, By correspondence2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Inter-Benchmark Protocol for Herring in Subdivision 30 (IBP-Her30) worked by correspondence  between  February  28  and  March  28  2013. Verena Trenkel  (France) served as Chair with invited expert Noel Cadigan (Canada). There were six participants. The objectives of the groups were to review the work carried out in response to the benchmark working group WKPELA in 2012.

  • 10.
    Bergström, Lena
    et al.
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Anna
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Hamrén, Henrik
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jacob, Ute
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Kininmonth, Stuart
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Large, Scott
    ICES, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Levin, Phil
    Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, USA.
    Lehikoinen, Annukka
    Helsinki University, Kotka Maritime Research Centre, Kotka, Finland.
    Llope, Marcos
    Instituto Español de Oceanografía, Centro Oceanográfico de Cádiz, Spain.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Müller-Karulis, Bärbel
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möllmann, Christian
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Olsson, Jens
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Otto, Saskia
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Rau, Andrea
    Thuenen-Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Reid, David
    Marine Institute, Rinville, Galway, Ireland.
    Tomczak, Maciej, T.
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Torres, Marian
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food safety, Animal Health and Environment, Riga, Latvia.
    Uusitalo, Laura
    Finnish Environment Institute, Marine Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wesslander, Karin
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Marine Environment, Västra Frölunda, Sweden.
    Report of the ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea (WGIAB)2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea(WGIAB) was established in 2007 as a forum for developing and combining ecosystembasedmanagement efforts for the Baltic Sea. The group intends to serve as a scientificcounterpart and support for the ICES Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group(WGBFAS) as well as for efforts and projects related to Integrated Ecosystem Assessments(IEA) within ICES and HELCOM. The group works in cooperation with similargroups within the ACOM/SCICOM Steering Group on Integrated Ecosystem Assessments(SSGIEA).The 2015 WGIAB meeting was held in Cádiz, Spain, from 9–13 March, back-to-backwith the meeting of its counterpart in the Working Group on Ecosystem Assessmentof Western European Shelf Seas (WGEAWESS). The meetings had joint sessions as wellas WG specific work, and some participants effectively participated in both meetings.The WGIAB meeting was attended by 27 participants from nine countries. The meetingwas chaired by Christian Möllmann, Germany, Laura Uusitalo, Finland and Lena Bergström,Sweden.This was the last year of the ongoing three-year Terms of Reference (ToR) for WGIAB.The main working activities in 2015 were to i) conduct studies on Baltic Sea ecosystemfunctioning with the goal to publish case studies from different parts of the Baltic Seain peer-reviewed journals, ii) work on the demonstration exercise to develop ecosystem-based assessment and advice for Baltic fish stocks focusing on cod (DEMO) withmultiple approaches, iii) plan further how to integrate the social and economic aspectsmore tightly in the WGIAB work, and iv) discuss the future focus and format of theWGIAB work.The Baltic ecosystem functioning activity focused on identifying and exploring keytrends and linkages in the Baltic Sea foodweb. This was pursued by presentation andfurther discussion of ongoing intersessional work on foodweb modelling and integratedanalyses, and by exercises to develop conceptual models Baltic Sea foodwebsand the links to ecosystem function. Long-term monitoring datasets on the abiotic andbiotic parts of the Baltic Sea Proper ecosystem were updated for use in the continuedwork to develop environmental indicators for fisheries and marine management.The focus of the DEMO 3 (DEMOnstration exercise for Integrated Ecosystem Assessmentand Advice of Baltic Sea cod) was on finding a way to use the results from theDEMO1 and DEMO2 workshops in short and midterm projections/scenarios of Balticcod dynamics based on different types of modelling, as well as designing methodologyand modelling data for practical implementation of Integrated Advice for Baltic cod.The WGIAB was positively inclined towards including social and economic aspectsinto the integrated assessment. Openings to this path were provided by presentationon ongoing project work, and discussing their linkages to ecological aspects. It wasseen as crucial that experts on social and economic analysis should be included andtake an active part in the future work of the group.The group concluded that its upcoming work should focus more closely on functionaldiversity, which was identified as a recurring issue in the Baltic Sea. This approach wasalso identified as a useful connection point between scientific and management aspectsin order for the group to continue serving as a forum for developing ecosystem-basedmanagement efforts in the Baltic Sea. A focus on functional diversity was also seen as2 | ICES WGIAB REPORT 2015a potentially feasible way of bringing together management aspects for different sectors,by linking to ecosystem services concepts.The group proposed Saskia Otto, Germany and Martin Lindegren, Denmark as newincoming Chairs, together with Lena Bergström, Sweden and Laura Uusitalo, Finland.Having four Chairs is justified due to the wide scope of the group's work, as well asthe increased work load due to the planned new foci.

  • 11.
    Biswas, M. K.
    et al.
    Huazhong Agricultural University, China.
    Ahmed, M. B.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Mondal, M. A. A.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Razvy, M. A.
    Huazhong Agricultural University, China.
    Hoque, A.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Islam, R.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hossaina, M.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    In exploitation of genetic diversity in potato breeding2010In: Agronomski Glasnik (Agronomy Journal), ISSN 1848-8900, Vol. 72, no 4-5, p. 261-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a view to select divergent parents genetic diversity was estimated among twenty genotypes. Thirty F1 progenies developed by line-tester mating were studied from seedling generation to first clonal generation for five important agronomic traits. Cluster analysis reveals that the parents could be grouped into seven different clusters. Cluster means showed wide range of variation for several traits among singles as well as multi genotypic clusters. Considering diversity pattern, parents should select from cluster I, III, IV, and V for the improvement of potato. Analysis of variance revealed that all most all the sources of variation were highly significant for all the studied traits in both generations. Parents Challisha, Lalpakri, Patnai, Chamak, Sadagoti, TPS-67 and TPS-364 were found to be good general combiners for tuber yield and yield contribution traits due to their gca effects. The sca effects showed that out of 30 hybrids 12 were found to have specific combining ability for tuber yield and those hybrids also exhibited considerable heterosis for tuber yield and yield contributing traits.

  • 12.
    Eero, Margit
    et al.
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Behrens, Jane
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Buchmann, Kurt
    Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cardinale, Massimiliano
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Casini, Michele
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Hüssy, Karin
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Kirkegaard, Eskil
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment “BIOR”, Riga, Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Köster, Friedrich W.
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Plikshs, Maris
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment “BIOR”, Riga, Latvia.
    Radtke, Krzysztof
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Schmidt, Jörn
    Department of Economics, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Tomczak, Maciej T.
    Stockholm University, Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vinther, Morten
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Zimmermann, Christopher
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Eastern Baltic cod in distress: biological changes and challenges for stock assessment2015In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 2180-2186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eastern Baltic (EB) cod (Gadus morhua) stock was depleted and overexploited for decades until the mid-2000s, when fishing mortality rapidlydeclined and biomass started to increase, as shown by stock assessments. These positive developments were partly assigned to effective managementmeasures, and the EB cod was considered one of the most successful stock recoveries in recent times. In contrast to this optimistic view, theanalytical stock assessment failed in 2014, leaving the present stock status unclear. Deteriorated quality of some basic input data for stock assessmentin combination with changes in environmental and ecological conditions has led to an unusual situation for cod in the Baltic Sea, which posesnew challenges for stock assessment and management advice.Anumber of adverse developments such as low nutritional condition and disappearanceof larger individuals indicate that the stock is in distress. In this study, we (i) summarize the knowledge of recent changes in cod biology andecosystem conditions, (ii) describe the subsequent challenges for stock assessment, and (iii) highlight the key questions where answers are urgentlyneeded to understand the present stock status and provide scientifically solid support for cod management in the Baltic Sea.

  • 13.
    Ekström, Anette
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nissen, Eva
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Process-oriented training in breastfeeding attitudes and continuity of care improve mothers perception of support2007In: Health Education Research Trends / [ed] Peter R. Hong, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2007, p. 211-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Fagerlind, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Stålhammar, Hans
    VikingGenetics, Skara.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Expression of miRNAs in Bull Spermatozoa Correlates with Fertility Rates2015In: Reproduction in domestic animals, ISSN 0936-6768, E-ISSN 1439-0531, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 587-594Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Frisk, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Annie
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Sellman, Stefan
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Flisberg, Patrik
    The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rönnqvist, Mikael
    Département de génie mécanique, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
    Wennergren, Uno
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Route optimization as an instrument to improve animal welfare and economics in pre-slaughter logistics2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0193223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each year, more than three million animals are transported from farms to abattoirs in Sweden. Animal transport is related to economic and environmental costs and a negative impact on animal welfare. Time and the number of pick-up stops between farms and abattoirs are two key parameters for animal welfare. Both are highly dependent on efficient and qualitative transportation planning, which may be difficult if done manually. We have examined the benefits of using route optimization in cattle transportation planning. To simulate the effects of various planning time windows and transportation time regulations and number of pick-up stops along each route, we have used data that represent one year of cattle transport. Our optimization model is a development of a model used in forestry transport that solves a general pick-up and delivery vehicle routing problem. The objective is to minimize transportation costs. We have shown that the length of the planning time window has a significant impact on the animal transport time, the total driving time and the total distance driven; these parameters that will not only affect animal welfare but also affect the economy and environment in the pre-slaughter logistic chain. In addition, we have shown that changes in animal transportation regulations, such as minimizing the number of allowed pick-up stops on each route or minimizing animal transportation time, will have positive effects on animal welfare measured in transportation hours and number of pick-up stops. However, this leads to an increase in working time and driven distances, leading to higher transportation costs for the transport and negative environmental impact.

  • 16.
    Gordobil, Oihana
    et al.
    University of the Basque Country, Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain.
    Moriana, Rosana
    KTH Royal Institute of technology.
    Zhang, Liming
    KTH Royal Institute of technology.
    Labidi, Jalel
    University of the Basque Country, Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain.
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    KTH Royal Institute of technology.
    Assesment of technical lignins for uses in biofuels and biomaterials: Structure-related properties, proximate analysis and chemical modification2016In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 83, p. 155-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of organosolv and kraft eucalyptus and spruce lignin as feedstock for polymeric materials and biofuel applications was assessed. Proximate analysis was used to predict the heating values and char formation. Chemical modification, based on the esterification reaction with methacryloyl chloride, was applied to introduce vinyl groups into the lignin macromolecules for enhanced reactivity. Kraft eucalyptus and spruce lignins had a more condensed structure than organosolv lignins, which resulted in greater thermal stability for these lignins. For different species within the same process, the thermal parameters showed a correlation with certain structural and compositional parameters (ash and sugars content, molecular weight and degree of condensation). Organosolv spruce lignin produced the highest heating value of 24. MJ/Kg, which is suitable for biofuel applications. The content of phenolic OH groups was higher for kraft lignins and especially higher for softwood lignins, both organosolv and kraft. The degree of methacrylation, estimated from the content of vinyl groups per C9 lignin unit, was significantly greater for organosolv lignins than for kraft lignins despite the higher OH-groups content in the latter.

  • 17.
    Hirche, Elin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    AM I FUNNY NOW?: The Neurological Basis of Humor Styles2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present thesis will provide an overview of how the four humor styles, affiliative, self-enhancing, aggressive, and self-defeating humor, are connected to different brain areas. The thesis will also include an overview of how humor in general, and especially three factors of humor including, processing, appreciation, and comprehension is connected to different brain areas. The present study found a connection between these three factors of humor and activation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). The four humor styles were all connected to activity in the midbrain and nucleus accumbens (NAc), though they were found to differ in other parts of the brain. Affiliative humor and self-enhancing humor are humor styles found to share activation of similar brain areas, whereas self-enhancing and aggressive humor was found to the least extent share activation of the same brain areas. No neural differences in relation to the four humor styles have been found between men and woman, or between cultures.

  • 18.
    Holmgren, Noél M. A.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Aps, Robert
    University of Tartu, Estonian Marine Institute, Tallin, Estonia.
    Kuikka, Sakari
    Fisheries and Environmental Management Group, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    MSY-orientated management of Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus) during different ecosystem regimes2012In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 257-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea ecosystem has undergone dramatic changes, so-called ecosystem regime shifts, during the past four decades. Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus) spawning-stock biomass has declined to a third, and weight-at-age has halved as a result of food shortages and competition with sprat (Sprattus sprattus). The management objective for the herring stock is currently in transition from precautionary to maximum sustainable yield (MSY). The main basin Baltic Sea herring was modelled under the current ecosystem regime and the effect of a recovery of the cod (Gadus morhua) stock and the availability of planktonic food to levels found in the early 1980s analysed. A target of F-MSY = 0.16 for herring, which should decline to F-MSY = 0.10 with recovery of the cod stock, is proposed. An increase in the availability of planktonic food is estimated to more than double the yield at F-MSY = 0.27, overriding the negative effects of cod predation should there be a simultaneous increase in both cod and availability of planktonic food. The estimated net increase in yield is 40% at F-MSY = 0.20. Functions are presented to calculate FMSY and to estimate the expected yield depending on the abundance of cod and food availability. Retrospective application of the functions is indicative of overfishing of herring in the 1990s and early 2000s, and a net loss in yield, with a landing value of some E440 million.

  • 19. Hooshyar Yousefi, Bahram
    et al.
    Najjar Azali, Negin
    IAU Tabriz.
    Analysis of the Sociability Improvement as a Concept in Urban Spaces/Places: the Case of Miyar-Miyar in Tabriz2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    's economy, as the most populated city in the Tabriz1 northwest of Iran and a major industry and trade hub, is gradually improving which causes dramatic effects in accordance with the urban/architecture cultural development. Architectural/urban aspects are very sensitive to the issue of the place perception; whether we are equipped to develop a confrontation strategy related to the different challenges of urban/architectural context or not, we have to deal with the social consequences. By definition if we consider a "social urban place" as an integrated object includes our memories and life courses. In a contextual point of view, we identify ourselves with social spatial memories provided by the place we have been experiencing; on the other hand, a ―place‖ without this potential would not respond the needs of the identical sociability and eventually the existence of urban places. In this study we developed identity- based approaches to explain an understandings of ―place‖ the urban area Miyar Miyar [Persian: میار میار [in Tabriz. We have examined the relationship between this public space and social aspects and developed a perceptional platform to analyse the characteristics of the place and place identity associated with the physical built environment. In order to achieve the mentioned platform, we have investigated different factors that have been affecting the formation of the place, mostly the qualitative components. The paper also contains an argument about the existing models and methods of recent changes in Miyar-Miyar and and analytical prospect toward the recent developments considering the Islamic/Iranian spatial forms and concepts/theories and the perception of the audience; then we mention the possibilities of the contribution of the perception to design a responsive environment as sustainable attitude.

  • 20.
    Hooshyar Yousefi, Bahram
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Najjar Azali, Negin
    Master of Architecture, Independent Researcher.
    Integration of BIM and IoT in the Building Heritage: A KM Conceptual Framework2018In: Landscape in Transition: Middle East Landscape Architecture Conference (MELAC 2018) / [ed] Parastoo Eshrati, Tehran: IFLA, Middle East , 2018, p. 11-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current progress in the field of Building Informa on Modeling (BIM) and the new possibili es facilitated by IoT (Internet of Things) pla orms could contribute to the stream of the integra ng improvement of the knowledge-based built heritage management. In this paper, ُthe concept of integra on of BIM and IoT would appear as a process of coordina on of all phases under a proper knowledge-based strategic approach. The op mal provided model would eventually be essen al to integrate common sub-processes grounded on the developed BIM-IoT principles/model. The eventual model has been conceptualized through the correspondence of BIM with WSN (Wireless Sensors Network) as the central management brain of the opera on and maintenance of the buildings referring to the sustainability concept and conducts as a Knowledge Management System (KMS).

  • 21.
    Howell, Daniel
    et al.
    Institute of Marine Research, Nordnes, Norway.
    Kempf, Alexander
    Thuenen Institute of Sea Fisheries, Hamburg, Germany.
    Belgrano, Andrea
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Thorpe, Robert
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Suffolk, United Kingdom.
    Vinther, Morten
    DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Bartolino, Valerio
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pope, John
    NRC (Europe) Ltd.
    Perez Rodriguez, Alfonso
    Wageningen Marine Research.
    Gaichas, Sarah
    NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, MA, USA.
    Cerviño, Santiago
    Instituto Españo de Oceanografia, Spain.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Spence, Michael
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Suffolk, United Kingdom.
    Villanueva, Ching
    French Institute of Research for the Exploitation of the sea, Plouzané, France.
    Kulatska, Nataliia
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. of Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Sturludottir, Erla
    Science Institution, University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Trijoulet, Vanessa
    Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, MA, USA.
    Rindorf, Anna
    DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Andonegi, Eider
    AZTI, Pasaia, Spain.
    Altuna, Miren
    AZTI, Pasaia, Spain.
    Sánchez Maroño, Sonia
    AZTI, Pasaia, Spain.
    Urtizberea, Agurtzane
    AZTI, Pasaia, Spain.
    Interim Report of the Working Group on Multispecies Assessment Methods (WGSAM)2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The pan-regional Working Group on Multispecies Assessment Methods (WGSAM) met in San Sebastian, Spain, 16–20 October 2017. In this eleventh report of the group, work focused on three of the multi-annual ToRs (B, C, D). Based on their knowledge, participants provided an updated inventory of progress of multispecies models in ICES Ecoregions (ToR A), noting those regions where no information was available. A Key Run (ToR B) of the North Sea Stochastic Multispecies Model (SMS) was presented and reviewed in detail by 4 WGSAM experts, and approved by the group following implementation of changes agreed in plenary at the meeting and verified by a subset of experts post-meeting. The Key Run is documented in detail in Annex for ToR B, with key outputs summarised in Section 5 and data files made available on the WGSAM webpage and the ICES expert group Github (https://github.com/iceseg/wg_WGSAM). Since the M2 values are used for the assessment of important North Sea stocks, it is recommended to publish the annex also on the official stock annex website. In addition, WGSAM does not recommend updating existing data series of natural mortality by simply adding the latest three new years. The timeseries as a whole shows patterns which are not retained by this procedure. Multispecies model skill assessment (ToR C) and multi-model ensemble methods (ToR D) were emphasized this year. Considerable progress has been made towards advancing both aspects of multispecies modelling. Investigation of skill assessment and ensemble methods and case studies is critical to ensure that outputs of multispecies assessment models are reliable for use in operational assessment and to inform management decisions. Progress was also made on investigations of top predator impacts on managed fish across several regions (ToR F), including the North Sea where new information was included in the SMS key run. Further progress was also made on multispecies and ecosystem level reference points and harvest control rules in mixed fisheries (ToR G).

  • 22.
    Howell, Daniel
    et al.
    Institute of Marine Research, Nordnes, Norway.
    Mackinson, Steve
    CEFAS, United Kingdom.
    Kempf, Alexander
    Thuenen Institute of Sea Fisheries, Hamburg, Germany.
    Rindorf, Anna
    DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Belgrano, Andrea
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden / Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment (SIME), Göteborg, Sweden.
    Thorpe, Robert
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), United Kingdom.
    Vinther, Morten
    DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Bartolino, Valerio
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pope, John
    NRC (Europe) Ltd.
    Rodriguez, Alfonso Perez
    Institute of Marine Research, Nordnes, Norway.
    Garcia, Clement
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), United Kingdom.
    Lehuta, Sigrid
    French Institut of Research for the Exploitation of the Sea (Ifremer), Nantes, France .
    Kaplan, Isaac
    NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, USA.
    Gaichas, Sarah
    NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, USA.
    Kiersten, Curti
    NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, USA.
    Lucey, Sean
    Dept. of Commerce/NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, USA.
    Gamble, Robert
    NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, USA.
    Cole, Harriet
    Marine Lab, Marine Scotland Science, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
    Lindstrom, Ulf
    Instittute of Marine Research, Tromsø, Norway.
    Holmgren, Noel
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Villanueva, Ching
    French Institut of Research for the Exploitation of the Sea (Ifremer), Plouzané, France.
    Poos, Jan Jaap
    IMARES, IJmuiden, The Netherlands.
    Report of the Working Group on Multispecies Assessment Methods (WGSAM), 9–13 November 2015, Woods Hole, USA2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Three meetings were held between 2013 and 2015 (Stockholm, London and Woods Hole), with progress being made on all the Terms of Reference. WGSAM has been making significant contributions required to enable ICES to develop its capability to give advice on the ecosystem impacts of fishing and climate change. This is a priority area identified in the ICES strategic plan and is consistent with scientific needs to support implementation of the Common Fisheries Policy and Marine Strategy Framework Directive. This final report summarises the key progress made against each ToR. A particularly important area established during this period has been the discussions that have led to guidelines on quality assurance of ecosystem models in-tended for advice giving. WGSAM prepared a specific briefing on this issue and con-tinues to work on issues related to model review processes, model validation and developing methods for generating advice from multi-model ensembles. These are all important areas of work in the evolution toward giving integrated, ecosystem-based advice to ICES clients. We recommend that ICES supports continuation of WGSAM new ToRs and considers more specifically how to support WGSAM in developing advice relevant products.

  • 23.
    Håkansson, Nina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Flisberg, P.
    Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Algers, B.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Annie
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Rönnqvist, M.
    Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden / University Laval, Quebec City, Canada.
    Wennergren, U.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping, Sweden.
    Improvement of animal welfare by strategic analysis and logistic optimisation of animal slaughter transportation2016In: Animal Welfare, ISSN 0962-7286, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 255-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transportation of animals to slaughterhouses is a major welfare concern. The number of slaughterhouses has decreased over time in Europe due to centralisation. This is expected to increase transport time for animals and as a consequence negatively affect animal welfare. We propose an optimisation model based on a facility location model to perform strategic analysis to improve transportation logistics. The model is tested on the Swedish slaughter transport system. We show that, by strategic planning and redirection of transports while keeping the slaughterhouse capacities as of the originaldata, the potential exists to reduce transport distance by 25% for pigs and 40% for cattle. Furthermore, we demonstrated that approximately 50% of Swedish slaughterhouses can be shut down with a minimal effect on total transport distances. This implies that in terms of the overall welfare picture, the decision of which animals to send where plays a for more significant role than the number of slaughterhouses. In addition, by changing relative weights on distances in the optimisation function the amount of individualtransports with longjourney times can be decreased. We also show results from altered slaughterhouse capacity and geographical location of slaughterhouses. This is the first time an entire country has been analysed in great detail with respect to the location, capacity and number of slaughterhouses. The focus is mainly on the analysis of unique and detailed information of actual animal transports in Sweden and a demonstration of the potential impact redirection of the transports and/ or altering of slaughterhouses can have on animal welfare.

  • 24.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Behav Sci, S-58183 Linköping, Sweden.
    Odén, Anders
    Chalmers, Dept Math Sci, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Owe
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    A comparison of experiences of training emergency care in military exercises and competences among conscript nurses with different levels of education2007In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, E-ISSN 1930-613X, Vol. 172, no 10, p. 1046-1052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The military emergency care education of nurses is primarily concerned with the treatment of soldiers with combat-related injuries. Even though great progress has been made in military medicine, there is still the pedagogical question of what emergency care education for military nurses should contain and how it should be taught. The aim of this study was to describe and compare experiences of training emergency care in military exercises among conscript nurses with different levels of education. A descriptive study was performed to describe and compare experiences of training emergency care in military exercises among conscript nurses with different levels of education in nursing. There were statistical differences between nurses with general nursing education and nurses with a general nursing education and supplementary education. A reasonable implication of the differences is that the curriculum must be designed differently depending on the educational background of the students. Hence, there is an interaction between background characteristics, e.g., the level of previous education and differences pertaining to clinical experience of the participants, and the impact of the exercise itself.

  • 25.
    Karpushevskaia, Anastasiia
    et al.
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Nielsen, Anders
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Mikhaylov, Andrey
    Atlantic Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography (AtlantNIRO), Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Albert, Anu
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Berg, Casper Willestofte
    DTU Aqua National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Svecovs, Fausts
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Bastardie, François
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Strods, Guntars
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Strehlow, Harry Vincent
    Thünen Institute, Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Degel, Henrik
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Section for Monitoring and Data, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Sics, Ivo
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Turku, Finland.
    Boje, Jesper
    DTU Aqua, Arctic Section, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Natural resources and bioproduction, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hommik, Kristiina
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Öhman, Kristin
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Radtke, Krzysztof
    National Marine Fisheries, Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Plikshs, Maris
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Riga, Latvia.
    Pedersen, Martin Wæver
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Afanasyev, Pavel
    Atlantic Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography (AtlantNIRO), Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Jounela, Pekka
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Statistical methods, Turku Finland.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute, Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Statkus, Romas
    Fisheries Service under the Ministry of Agriculture, Division of Fisheries Research and Science, Klaipeda, Lithuania.
    Carlshamre, Sofia
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Jonusas, Stanislovas
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Brussels, Belgium.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Section for Fisheries Advice Population Ecology and Genetics, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Stoetera, Sven
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Smolinski, Szymon
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Arula, Timo
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Dept. of Ecodynamics, Lootsiza, Estonia.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Zolubas, Tomas
    Fisheries Service under the Ministry of Agriculture, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Amosova, Viktoriia
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Grygiel, Wlodzimierz
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Mirny, Zuzanna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Report of the Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS), 12-19 April 2016, ICES HQ, Copenhagen, Denmark2016Report (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lundström, Christina
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Lantbrukares beslutsfattande och lantbruksrådgivning: en förstudie (DEMIPROF)2014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this pilot study was to decrease the lack of understanding concerning farmers’ decision-making in order to gain a deeper portrayal of farmers' decision-making by studying decision-making in practice. Farmers' decision-making is a process that is influenced by a variety of factors and requires that farmers are versed in many specialized areas. Previous research in this area lacks a holistic perspective where biological, technical, economic, ethical and social factors are integrated, in order to describe the farmers’ lifeworld. Three farmers from western Sweden were included in the study, which has been conducted as a multiple case study, in the form of workplace studies, in order to identify the participating farmers' lifeworld, the support through advisors and various external resources, eg. IT tools. This qualitative research design has resulted in a number of detailed descriptions of how choices and decisions are made at the farm level, than had not been possible with more quantitative methods and statistical analysis of socio-economic variables. According to researchers in the field "farm management" this kind of studies are currently missing in the agricultural domain, and this study is considered to be a first step in that direction. The result highlights a number of factors regarding how the farmers consider their situation and lifeworld, of the advisory role and the impact of IT and other tangible artifacts. The report includes a discussion of the results obtained, different views and explanations of knowledge and thinking, and provides suggestions for further research. The report ends with some conclusions which indicate that farmers’ being-in-the-world is complex and can be described as a dynamic system without clear linear causality, which is both fascinating and frustrating. The advisory service is primarily considered as a support function and a sounding board for more current decisions regarding crops, spraying and fertilizing, while major and strategic decisions are initially discussed in other networks. The advisory service needs to develop by expanding a little more outside the comfort zone of ordinary activities and take some height in more strategic terms for the farm as a whole

  • 27.
    Orio, Alessandro
    et al.
    SLU, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Anders
    DTU Aqua, Denmark.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    Morski Instytut Rybacki, Poland.
    Berg, Casper
    DTU Aqua, Denmark.
    Ustups, Didzis
    BIOR, Latvia.
    Artemenkov, Dmitriy
    Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography, Russia.
    Schade, Franziska
    Thünen-Institut, Germany.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    BIOR, Latvia.
    Degel, Henrik
    DTU Aqua, Denmark.
    Strehlow, Harry
    Thünen-Institut, Germany.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Russia.
    Horbowy, Jan
    Morski Instytut Rybacki, Poland.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Luke Natural Resources Institute, Finland.
    Boje, Jesper
    DTU Aqua, Denmark.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    SLU, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Johan
    SLU, Sweden.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Luke Natural Resources Institute, Finland.
    Hommik, Kristiina
    Öhman, Kristin
    SLU, Sweden.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua, Denmark.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua, Denmark.
    Plikshs, Maris
    BIOR, Latvia.
    Casini, Michele
    SLU, Sweden.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    SLU, Sweden.
    Mosegaard, Henrik
    Holmgren, Noel
    SLU, Sweden.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    SLU, Sweden.
    Jounela, Pekka
    Luke Natural Resources Institute, Finland.
    Statkus, Romas
    Lithuania.
    Jonusas, Stanislovas
    European Commission.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua, Denmark.
    Stoetera, Sven
    Thünen-Institut, Germany.
    Raid, Tiit
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Mildenberger, Tobias
    DTU Aqua, Denmark.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thünen-Institut, Germany.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen-Institut, Germany.
    Amosova, Viktoriia
    AtlantNIRO, Russia.
    Grygiel, Wlodzimierz
    Morski Instytut Rybacki, Poland.
    Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep
    SLU, Sweden.
    Mirny, Zuzanna
    Morski Instytut Rybacki, Poland.
    Report of the Baltic Fisheries AssessmentWorking Group (WGBFAS): 19-26 April 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS) met 19-26 April 2017(Chair: Tomas Gröhsler, Germany and Co-chair: Michele Casini, Sweden), with 41 participants and 9 countries represented. The objective of WGBFAS was to assess the status of the following stocks: Sole in Division 3.a, SDs 20–24; Cod in Kattegat, Cod in SDs 22–24, Cod in SDs 25–32; Herring in SDs 25–27, 28.2, 29 and 32, Herring in SD 28.1 (Gulf of Riga), Herring in SDs 30-31 (Gulf of Bothnia); Sprat in SDs 22–32; Plaice in SDs 21–23, Plaice in SDs 24–25; Flounder in SDs 22–23, in SDs 24–25, in SDs 26+28 and SDs 27+29–32; Brill in SDs 22–32, Dab in SDs 22–32 and Turbot in SDs 22–32. WGBFAS also identified the data needed for next year’s data call with some suggestions for improvements in the data call, and stock-specific research needs.The report contains an introduction with the summary of other WGs relevant for the WGBFAS, the methods used, and ecosystem considerations. The results of the analytical stock assessment or survey trends for the species listed above are then presented with all the stocks with the same species in the same sections. The report ends with references, recommendations, links to Stock Annexes and list of Working Documents.The principle analytical models used for the stock assessments were XSA and SAM. For most flatfishes and cod in SDs 25–32 (data limited stocks), CPUE trends from bottomtrawl surveys were used in the assessment (except plaice in SDs 24–25 for which relative SSB from SAM was used). For the data limited stocks, reference points based on length-based indicators were estimated (except cod in SDs 25-32 for which relative reference points were estimated using the SPiCT model). For cod in SDs 25–32, intersessional work was planned to hopefully allow returning to an analytical stock assessment in the near future. Ecosystem changes have been analytically considered in the following stock assessments: Herring in SD 25–27, 28.2, 29 and 32, and Sprat in SD 22–32, in form of cod predation mortality.

  • 28.
    Patel, Angana Heet
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Unravelingthe molecular mechanism behind metabolic reprogramming caused by alterations of the enzyme PI3-kinase2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes play a key role in cancer induction and progression. They directly or indirectly regulate critical metabolic pathways, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase pathway being frequently activated pathway in cancer. The catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), p110α, is the most frequently mutated kinase in human cancer, E542K, E545K, and H1047R mutations being the most common. Expression of hepatic E545K and H1047R p110α mutants in vivo shows marked and rapid increase in hepatic lipid and glycogen accumulation in mice with developmental (chronic) liver-specific deletion of p110α, which was not seen in mice when wildtype p110α is overexpressed. To investigate the logical pathways that could explain the lipid accumulation in mutant expressing mice, RNA sequencing from wildtype, knockout and mutated mouse livers was performed. Read alignment and count quantification was done using the Rsubread package and the statistical analyses are performed using the DeSeq2 package. Differentially expressed genes were identified with adjusted p-value of 0.05. Gene ontology analysis was performed on the differentially expressed genes using clusterProfiler, an R package to identify several key pathways which were upregulated and downregulated among the different sample groups. Signaling pathways related to cell cycle processes were mainly upregulated in the mutated samples when compared with the wildtype as well as knockout samples while signaling pathways related to many metabolic processes seem to be downregulated in mutated samples, even though these mutants showed upregulated metabolism by accumulation of lipids and glycogen physiologically. To confirm the results of gene expression data the results have to be cross validated with the gold standard quantitative Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

  • 29.
    Pavani, Krishna Chaitanya
    University of the Azores.
    Optimization of a specific messenger RNA extraction protocol for fresh and vitrified bovine oocytes to gene expression studies: Specific mRNA extraction protocol for bovine oocytes.2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To understand bovine oocytes meiotic maturation, developmental potential, gene expression is required. The gene expression studies in the preimplantation bovine oocytes has been difficult, because the procedures that are being employed for extracting total RNA are not specific for bovine oocytes and so far is not providing the required amount for further procedures. Quantification of genes generally requires large amounts of total RNA in order to overcome the problem of low amount of mRNA present, so a standardized specific protocol is recommended. These days most of the researchers are using commercial Kit protocols without knowing the significance of chemicals and how they are acting on cells. In present project a standardized protocol (modified trizol) was designed for bovine oocytes, which was specific and less expensive. The efficiency of this protocol compared with Pure Link (Kit Protocol), GNTC (Guanidinium thiocyanate) for extraction of total RNA from fresh oocytes, vitrified oocytes with PROH (1,2 propanediol) and DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) cryoprotectans was much better. The RNA (absorbance 260/280) purity levels of the standardized protocol was ranging (1.50-2.10), whereas for GNTC protocol (1.05-1.36), Pure Link (kit protocol) (2.05-2.7). Amplification of housekeeping genes (SDHA and GAPDH gene) showed the specificity and efficiency of the standardized protocol over other protocols.

  • 30.
    Russo, Marika D.
    et al.
    Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, University of Bremen, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Kourides, Yannis
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Cyprus.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    Russo, Paula
    Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    The impact of adding sugars to milk and fruit on adiposity and diet quality in children: A cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of the identification and prevention of dietary-and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants (IDEFICS) study2018In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 1350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sugar, particularly as free sugars or sugar-sweetened beverages, significantly contributes to total energy intake, and, possibly, to increased body weight. Excessive consumption may be considered as a proxy of poor diet quality. However, no previous studies evaluated the association between the habit of adding sugars to “healthy” foods, such as plain milk and fresh fruit, and indicators of adiposity and/or dietary quality in children. To answer to these research questions, we Panalysed the European cohort of children participating in the IDEFICS study. Anthropometric variables, frequency of consumption of sugars added to milk and fruit (SAMF), and scores of adherence to healthy dietary pattern (HDAS) were assessed at baseline in 9829 children stratified according to age and sex. From this cohort, 6929 children were investigated again after two years follow-up. At baseline, a direct association between SAMF categories and adiposity indexes was observed only in children aged 6–<10 years, while the lower frequency of SAMF consumption was significantly associated with a higher HDAS. At the two year follow-up, children with higher baseline SAMF consumption showed significantly higher increases in all the anthropometric variables measured, with the exception of girls 6–<10 years old. The inverse association between SAMF categories and HDAS was still present at the two years follow-up in all age and sex groups. Our results suggest that the habit to adding sugars to foods that are commonly perceived as healthy may impact the adherence to healthy dietary guidelines and increase in adiposity risk as well. 

  • 31.
    Segerdahl, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Anesthesia, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Warrén-Stomberg, Margareta
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Rawal, N.
    Örebro Univ Hosp, Dept Anesthesia & Intens Care, Örebro, Sweden .
    Brattwall, M.
    Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp Molndal, Unit Day Care Surg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Anesthesia, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clinical practice and routines for day surgery in Sweden2008In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Day surgery is common in paediatric surgical practice. Safe routines including parental and child information in order to optimise care and reduce anxiety are important. Most day surgery units are not specialised in paediatric care, which is why specific paediatric expertise is often lacking.

    Methods: We studied the practice of paediatric day surgery in Sweden by a questionnaire survey sent to all hospitals, obtaining an 88% response rate. Three specific paediatric cases were enquired for in more detail.

    Results: The proportion of paediatric day surgery vs. in-hospital procedures was 46%. Seventy-one out of 88 responding units performed paediatric day surgery. All units had anxiolytic pre-medication as a routine in 1–6-year-olds, and in 7–16-year-olds at 60% of the units. Most units performed circumcision and adenoidectomy, while 33% performed tonsillectomy. Anaesthesia induction was intravenous in older children, and also in 1–6-year-olds at 50% of the units. Parental presence at induction was mandatory. Post-operatively, 93% of units routinely assessed pain. Paracetamol and NSAIDs were the most common analgesics, as monotherapy or combined with rescue medication in the recovery as IV morphine. At 42% of units, take-home bags of analgesics were provided, covering 1–3 days of treatment. Pain was the most frequent complaint on follow-up. Micturition difficulties were common after circumcision, nausea after adenoidectomy and nutrition difficulties after tonsillectomy.

    Conclusions: In Sweden, most day surgery units perform paediatric surgery, most children receive pre-medication, anaesthesia is induced IV and take-home analgesics paracetamol and or NSAIDs are often provided. Still, pain is a common complaint after discharge.

  • 32.
    Slinde, Frode
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Vad behöver du för information för att göra ett bra arbete som dietist2007In: Dietistaktuellt, ISSN 1102-9285, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 28-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Stahel, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    1,25(OH)2D3 Initially Reduces TGFβ Activity in PC-3 Prostate Cancer Cells2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The vitamin D metabolite 1,25(OH)2D3 has long been known to inhibit growth of prostate cancer cells and this mainly through a VDR-mediated pathway controlling target gene expression, resulting in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and differentiation. Another major way in which 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits cell growth in prostate cancer is via membrane-initiated steroid signalling, which triggers activation of signal cascades upon steroid binding to a receptor complex, leading to induction of genes regulating cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. The main prostate cancer inhibiting membrane-initiated route is the TGFβ signalling pathway, elicited by the protein TGFβ. In this experiment the activating effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on TGFβ in prostate cancer cells, as well as two other important proteins downstream in this cascade, Smad2 and 3, were investigated. PC-3 cells were incubated for 3, 5, 10, 30 and 60 minutes as well as 38 hours both together with 1,25(OH)2D3 of the concentrations 10-10 and 10-7 M and without. As the downstream cascade protein JNK is a known activator of Smad2/3, this procedure was also repeated with a JNK inhibitor. An ELISA assay scanning for activated TGFβ was then performed on supernatants from the cells treated without JNK inhibitor. In addition, a Western Blot scanning for activated Smad2 and 3 was performed on supernatants from all groups of treatment. The analysis of the result values showed that 10-10 M 1,25(OH)2D3 significantly lowered the content of active TGFβ in PC-3 cells within 3 and 5 minutes. Unfortunately the Western Blot was unsuccessful and needs therefore be repeated.

  • 34.
    Stahel, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    24,25(OH)2D3 and Regulation of Catalase Activity in LNCaP Prostate Cancer Cells: A Study of Long-term Effects2008Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The vitamin D metabolite 1,25(OH)2D3 has long been known to inhibit growth of prostate cancer cells and this has been attributed to a VDR-mediated pathway controlling target gene expression, resulting in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and differentiation. New research has shown that another vitamin D metabolite, 24,25(OH)2D3, inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells as well, more specifically, cells of the line LNCaP. It is not clear exactly how 24,25(OH)2D3 exerts this cancer growth inhibition but it has been shown that it is to some extent regulated via G protein coupled signalling pathways. Catalase is a haem-containing redox enzyme found in the majority of animal cells, plant cells and aerobic microorganisms. This enzyme is very important because it prevents excessive accumulation of the strongly oxidizing agent H2O2 which otherwise can do damage to the cells. Because of this preventive effect of catalase, important cellular processes which generate H2O2 as by-product can proceed safely. Biochemical analysis of catalase has shown that it binds endogenously to 24,25(OH)2D3. The fact that 24,25(OH)2D3 has anti-proliferative effects on prostate cancer cells combined with the fact that it binds to catalase generates the hypothesis that this binding interferes with the essential task of catalase to keep the cell free from accumulation of destructive H2O2, and by means of this interference induces apoptosis. Finding out about the cancer growth inhibiting mechanism behind each vitamin D metabolite is important and may be a lead in the search for a new, better treatment of prostate cancer. This is a follow-up to an earlier study, and the specific aim of this project was to find out if and in what way 24,25(OH)2D3 affects the enzymatic activity of catalase in LNCaP cells during long-term treatment (up to 48 hours). In this experiment LNCaP cells were incubated for 48 hours together with 24,25(OH)2D3 of the concentration 10-8 M, then a catalase assay was performed on the cells including fluorescence-mediated measuring of catalase activity in both treated and untreated cells. The analysis of the result values showed that despite of the rather high dose used, 24,25(OH)2D3 has no statistically significant effect on catalase activity in cells of the line LNCaP, regardless of time.

  • 35.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    et al.
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Denmark.
    Anu, Albert
    Department of fish biology and fisheries, Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu.
    Arula, Timo
    University of Tartu, Estonian Marine Institute, Dept. of Ecodynamics.
    Boje, Jesper
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil.
    Degel, Henrik
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Denmark.
    Eero, Margit
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Management Systems, Denmark.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil.
    Horbowy, Jan
    Sea Fisheries Institute in Gdynia, Poland.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Jonusas, Stanislovas
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Brussels, Belgium.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund.
    Karpushevskaia, Anastasiia
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Karpushevskiyi, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Latvian Fish Resources Agency, Riga.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil.
    Mikhaylov, Andrey
    Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries & Oceanography (VNIRO), Moscow.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute Kotka Unit.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute Turku.
    Statkus, Romas
    Division of fishery research and science, Fishery service under Ministry of Agriculture, Klaipeda, Lithuania.
    Stoetera, Sven
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Strehlow, Harry Vincent
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Karlskrona.
    Report of the Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS), 3-10 April 2014, ICES HQ, Copenhagen, Denmark2014Report (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    et al.
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Arula, Timo
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Boje, Jesper
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Degel, Henrik
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Eero, Margit
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Horbowy, Jan
    Sea Fisheries Institute in Gdynia, Poland.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jonusas, Stanislovas
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Belgium.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Karpushevskaia, Anastasiia
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Latvian Fish Resources Agency, Riga.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Mikhaylov, Andrey
    Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries & Oceanography (VNIRO), Russian Federation.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Sics, Ivo
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Statkus, Romas
    Fishery service under Ministry of Agriculture, Klaipeda, Lithuania.
    Stoetera, Sven
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Karlskrona.
    Report of the Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS), 10-17 April 2013, ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen2013Report (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Sunhede, Stellan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Vasiliauskas, Rimvydas
    Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ecology and decay pattern of Inocutis dryophila on Quercus robur2003In: Karstenia, ISSN 0453-3402, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biology of Inocutis dryophila (Berk.) Fiasson & Niemelä was studied on Quercus robur L. in Lithuania, based on 22 host trees. Decay columns caused by the fungus in six oaks,120–180 years old, were examined in detail by dissecting the stems. Length of the decay columns in different trees varied between 4.8 and 11 m. Vegetative compatibility tests with the isolates indicated that each rot column comprised of a single genet of the fungus, and that the rot columns in different trees represented different genets. Basidiocarps of the fungus were recorded from 0.7 to 12.5 m above the ground. Infection routes, forestry, and biodiversity aspects are discussed. Colour photographs are shown of the basidiocarp, decay of different stages, and confrontation tests among cultivated mycelia of the same and different genets.

  • 38.
    Tanveer, M. K.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Kamran, A.
    Department of Parasitology, University of Veterinary and animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan.
    Abbas, Muhammad Athar
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Umer, Nighat C.
    Department of Parasitology, University of Veterinary and animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan / Department of comparative biology and experimental medicine, University of Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.
    Azhar, M. A.
    Department of Parasitology, University of Veterinary and animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan.
    Munir, Muhammad Arif
    Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Division of Virology, Research and Development, Department of Virology, Immunobiology and Parasitology of the National, Veterinary Institute (SVA) and Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Ulls väg 2B, SE-751 89 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Prevalence and chemo-therapeutical investigations of gastrointestinal nematodes in domestic pigeons in Lahore, Pakistan2011In: Tropical Biomedicine, ISSN 0127-5720, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 102-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes was studied in 143 (80 male and 63 female) domestic pigeons. Faecal samples were collected to determine the gastrointestinal nematodes of domestic pigeons through qualitative and quantitative faecal examinations. A total of 48 (male 33 and 25 female) naturally infected domestic pigeons were divided into G(1) (albendzdole) and G(2) (fenbendazole) treatment-groups along with one control group (C). The overall prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes was 40.5% (58/143) in domestic pigeons. Likewise, the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes in males and females was found 41.3% (33/58) and 39.7% (25/58) respectively. The overall prevalence of Capillaria obsignata and Ascaridia columbae was found to be 67.2% and 32.8%, respectively. The prevalence of C. obsignata and A. columbae in males was 72.7% (24/33) and 27.8% (9/33) and in females was 60% (15/25) and 40% (10/25), respectively. There was no significant sex related difference seen in the prevalence of C. obsignata (p>0.56) and A. columbae (p>0.40) in domestic pigeons, respectively. The overall efficacy of albendazole and fenbendazole was calculated to be 66% and 71%. A remarkable significant difference (p<0.05) was observed in eggs per gram before and after treatment in both G(1) and G(2) treated-groups. The efficacy of fenbendazole was found to be more significant (p<0.02) than albendazole.

  • 39.
    Wallenhammar, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    HS Konsult AB, Örebro, Sweden.
    Algerin, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Tilevik, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ny metod bedömer risk för bomullsmögel2017In: Arvensis, ISSN 2000-0871, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Westin, Lars
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Danielson, Ella
    Sahlgrens Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden / Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Hlth Serv, Östersund, Sweden.
    Encounters in Swedish nursing homes: a hermeneutic study of residents' experiences2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 172-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This paper is a report of a study to illuminate and interpret the meaning of residents' experiences of encounters with nurses in nursing homes.

    Background. A large number of older people suffer from illness and become dependent on other people in their daily living. These people are often in need of care in nursing homes. It is assumed that encounters between nurses and residents are of importance in how residents experience care in nursing homes.

    Method. Twelve residents from three nursing homes in Sweden were interviewed in 2004–2005 about their experiences in encounters with nurses. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A hermeneutic method was used to describe and interpret the meaning of residents' experiences.

    Findings. Three themes emerged: 'being somebody', 'being nobody' and 'being in a community'. The encounters had both positive and negative influences on residents, expressed as being somebody and belonging somewhere or being nobody and not being seen as a person or simply being left out of things. Encounters between residents and nurses have a mutual dependency where residents certainly have some influence on the relationship. The nurses have both an influence on the relationship and a professional responsibility for the outcome of encounters with residents.

    Conclusion. The insights gained from the study can guide nurses in their encounters with residents in nursing homes so that they feel respected as unique human beings and part of a community.

1 - 40 of 40
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