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  • 1. Hellberg, Ingela
    et al.
    Augustsson, Veronica
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Elderly people’s experiences of living in special housing accommodation2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 5894-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Accounts of Pain Experience in a Swedish Elderly Care Context2010In: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Delaktighet i äldreomsorgens språkliga möten2012In: Delaktighet i samtal, - Kommunikationens villkor och förutsättningar för delaktighet i vård, omsorg och socialt arbete / [ed] P. Bülow, I. Sandén & D. Thunqvist-Persson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Karlsson, Christina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Registered nurses' shared knowledge construction of dementia careManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Department of ALM, Uppsala University, Sweden / Information Studies, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Hirvonen, Noora
    Information Studies, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland / Information Studies, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Enwald, Heidi
    Information Studies, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland / Information Studies, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Differences in Health Information Literacy Competencies Among Older Adults, Elderly and Younger Citizens2019In: Information Literacy in Everyday Life: 6th European Conference, ECIL 2018, Oulu, Finland, September 24–27, 2018, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Serap Kurbanoğlu, Sonja Špiranec, Yurdagül Ünal, Joumana Boustany, Maija Leena Huotari, Esther Grassian, Diane Mizrachi, Loriene Roy, Springer, 2019, Vol. 989, p. 136-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the research gap on age-based differences in health information literacy (HIL), we investigated how younger (born 1960–) and older adults (1946–1960), and elderly citizens (–1945) differed from each other by their HIL competencies. Data were collected with an online survey of patients using the Swedish national electronic health record system. Altogether, 2,587 users responded. One-way ANOVA with post hoc tests revealed several differences between the groups: younger adults were less likely to value health information than older adults; older adults and elderly were least likely to compare information from multiple sources and had trouble in determining health information needs; older adults were most likely to have trouble understanding health terminology and the elderly to have difficulties in understanding medicinal package labels. The study shows that HIL is not necessarily improving or declining but adapting to challenges of advanced age. © 2019, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Science, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden / Department of Administration, Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden / Primary Care, Region Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Science, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    School of Health and Social Sciences, University Dalarna, Falun, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Patients' experiences of support for learning to live with diabetes to promote health and well-being: A lifeworld phenomenological study2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning to live with diabetes in such a way that the new conditions will be a normal and natural part of life imposes requirements on the person living with diabetes. Previous studies have shown that there is no clear picture of what and how the learning that would allow persons to incorporate the illness into their everyday life will be supported. The aim of this study is to describe the phenomenon of support for learning to live with diabetes to promote health and well-being, from the patient’s perspective. Data were collected by interviews with patients living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The interviews were analysed using a reflective lifeworld approach. The results show that reflection plays a central role for patients with diabetes in achieving a new understanding of the health process, and awareness of their own responsibility was found to be the key factor for such a reflection. The constituents are responsibility creating curiosity and willpower, openness enabling support, technology verifying bodily feelings, a permissive climate providing for participation and exchanging experiences with others. The study concludes that the challenge for caregivers is to create interactions in an open learning climate that initiates and supports reflection to promote health and well-being.

  • 7.
    Mattsson, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna.
    Pietilä Rosendahl, Sirpa
    Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna.
    Teaching gerontology in globalized academics: a qualitative study of Thai nursing students' views on ageing when studying abroad.2017In: Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, ISSN 1037-6178, E-ISSN 1839-3535, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 36-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Negative views towards ageing and older adults may be a reason why nurses do not choose to work in gerontological nursing. Studying in another cultural context can challenge these views. The Objective was to explore nursing students' views on ageing and older adults before and after a gerontology course held abroad.

    DESIGN AND METHOD: A qualitative approach based on content analysis of responses to open-ended questions by 30 Thai nursing students studying a gerontology course in Sweden.

    RESULTS: Three main categories: positive imprints of ageing, ageing takes its toll, and knowledge leading to action, emerged through sub-categories carrying a view of older adults as not only in need of care, but also as resourceful and competent. Professional healthcare, besides family was seen as potential caregivers in old age.

    CONCLUSIONS: Studying gerontology abroad can widen views towards ageing and older adults, inspiring nurses to work in gerontological nursing.

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan.
    Conceptualizing and contextualizing mindfulness: New and critical perspectives2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation aims at analyzing mindfulness as a concept and a multidimensional phenomenon in its historic and primordial but also contemporary contexts. In the course of examining this more general question, this dissertation targets four specific objectives: 1) classifying existing definitions of mindfulness, 2) critically analyzing and interpreting the Buddhist and Western interpretations and practices of mindfulness, 3) elaborating on the social and existential dimensions of mindfulness, and 4) applying these dimensions in advancing the notion of mindful sustainable aging in the context of successful aging. Paper I examines and assesses the numerous definitions of mindfulness that have been presented over the years by a wide range of scholars from a variety of disciplines. Paper II traces the roots of modern mindfulness in Buddhism. It continues by exploring the utility and practices of mindfulness in the context of social work. The definitions provided in Paper I and the Buddhist underpinnings discussed in Paper II call attention to the fact that in addition to the more commonly considered physical and mental dimensions, mindfulness contains a social and an existential dimension as well – dimensions that remain under-researched and not well understood. To redress this imbalance, Paper III elaborates on these two latter dimensions, emphasizing their potential to enhance health, wellbeing and meaning in life. Paper III further argues that a more nuanced understanding of physical, mental, social and existential mindfulness can be obtained by examining the interconnectedness of all four fields. Paper IV continues the discussion of the social and the existential dimensions of mindfulness with specific emphasis on their utility for successful aging, and advances the notion of mindful sustainable aging. Paper IV highlights the potential of mindfulness for living a meaningful life and boosting the elderly’s capacity to find deeper meaning in their final stage of life.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Jönköping University.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    Jönköping University / University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mindful sustainable aging: Advancing a comprehensive approach to the challenges and opportunities of old age2015In: Europe's Journal of Psychology, ISSN 1841-0413, E-ISSN 1841-0413, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 494-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this article is to present a new concept called mindful sustainable aging (MSA), which is informed by mindfulness practices that support the physical, the mental, and especially, the social and the existential dimensions of old life. The concept of MSA is discussed and compared with four influential psychosocial theories in the field of gerontology, i.e., activity theory, disengagement theory, successful aging theory and gerotranscendence theory. The article ends with reviewing research on how mindfulness practice can help to manage, diminish and/or improve a number of serious physical conditions that are common among older people. The potential of mindfulness when it comes to facilitating for older adults in their quest for spiritual and existential meaning is discussed extensively throughout the article.

  • 10.
    Pietilä Rosendahl, Sirpa
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden / School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia
    Department of Behavioural Science and Social Work, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Björklund, Anita
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Images of sorrow: Experiences of losing a co-twin in old age2013In: Health, ISSN 1949-4998, E-ISSN 1949-5005, Vol. 5, no 12A, p. 64-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What it is like when a lifelong twin relationship ends through death in later life is the focus of this study. It draws on interview data from seven twins who are part of a longitudinal Swedish twin study (SATSA) and who lost their co-twins in old age. Data were analyzed using qualitative latent content analysis. The results showed that the experience of loss of the co-twin was pro-found, including an emotional as well as a be-havioral dimension. Loss and loneliness were expressed as the dominant feelings related to the quality of the missing relationship as well as the loss of twin identity. However, the grief ex-periences in this study were primarily related to the closeness and quality of the twin relation-ship, rather than identity. Behavioral adjust-ments included the use of outside as well as internal cognitive resources to cope with life after the loss. Despite the devastating experi-ence of losing a co-twin after a lifelong rela-tionship, the participants engaged actively in their own grief processes. It was concluded that twin loss is unique, in the sense of losing the relational twin identity, as well as it is charac-terized by similar features as the loss of a close relationship among non-twins.

  • 11.
    Pietilä Rosendahl, Sirpa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Söderman, Mirkka
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences, Eskilstuna, Sweden / Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Immigrants with dementia in Swedish residential care: An exploratory study of the experiences of their family members and nursing staff2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, no 18, p. 1-12, article id 200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Worldwide, there is a growing population of older people who develop dementia in a country other than that of their origin. When their dementia has reached an advanced stage, residential care is most often needed. People with dementia in Sweden are often cared for in group homes. For immigrants, this may mean a linguistically challenging care environment for both healthcare staff and the patients’ family members.

    The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of family members and professional caregivers regarding the care provided to immigrants with dementia in group homes in Sweden.

    Methods

    An exploratory, descriptive study with a qualitative approach was chosen. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine professional caregivers and five family members of people with dementia with Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian and Ingrian backgrounds; all were chosen purposefully. All people with dementia had lost their Swedish language skills as their second language. The data was analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    Three main categories and seven subcategories were identified. The first main category: A new living situation comprised the subcategories: adjusting to new living arrangements and expectations regarding activities and traditional food at the group home, the second main category: Challenges in communication with the subcategories: limited communication between the immigrant with dementia and the Swedish-speaking nursing staff and the consequences of linguistic misunderstandings and nuanced communication in a common language and the third main category: The role of the family member at the group home with the subcategories: a link to the healthy life story of the family member with dementia andan expert and interpreter for the nursing staff.

    Conclusions

    The family member played a crucial role in the lives of immigrants with dementia living in a group home by facilitating communication between the nursing staff and the PWD and also by making it possible for PWD to access the cultural activities they wanted and which professional caregivers were either not able to recognise as needed or could not deliver.

  • 12.
    Pietilä, Sirpa
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Tvillingskap genom livet: individualitet och relation i äldre tvillingars livsberättelser2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to explore, describe and understand experiences of twinship as told in the life stories of older twins. The 35 older twins who participated in this thesis were part of two longitudinal studies of older twins, SATSA (the Swedish Adoption Twin Study of Aging) and the Gender study. The study design is qualitative and the 35 interviews were collected using a narrative method. The life stories were analysed with narrative analysis (studies I and II) and qualitative, latent content analysis (studies III and IV).

    According to the twins in this thesis, twinship, was described from the relationship with the co-twin(I, III, IV) and from an identity perspective (II). Twin relationships are unique and different in their own way. Three relationship patterns were identified and labelled as: nurturing, draining or superficial based on qualitative aspects (I). The differences in the three relationship patterns became even more evident during critical stages in life, for example, when getting married (III) or losing the co-twin through death (IV). These events became turning points which meant that the twins needed to adjust to a more individualized life. Twins in nurturing or superficial relationship patterns did not experience these transitions as particularly dramatic, while for twins in draining relationships these life transitions were more dramatic. From an attachment theory point of view, the older twins remained attachment figures with an unaltered attachment pattern throughout life(I). Bound together with the close twin relationship is how twins define themselves, since the twinship means handling both your individual identity and the twin identity. The self-descriptions, with emphasis on differences, are viewed against the background of how the twins experienced the environment perceiving them as a social unity and were interpreted as a desire to emphasize ones individuality as related to the twin partner and as a message to the environment of desiring to be viewed as a unique individual (II).

    In summary twinship was described by most as a close, enriching relationship throughout life and for some, less enriching depending on what kind of relationship they had with their twin partner. An identity work was at the same time taking place, trying to establish a position as an individual in the twin relationship and to assert ones individuality to the rest of the environment in the message:“We are not as alike as you think!”

  • 13.
    Pietilä, Sirpa
    et al.
    Research School of Health and Welfare, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden / Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Björklund, Anita
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia
    Department of Behavioral Science and Social Work, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Older twins' experiences of the relationship with their co-twin over the life course2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on 35 life stories of aging twins, this study focuses on personal experiences and recollections of their relationships with the co-twin over the life course. The participants are part of two longitudinal Swedish twin studies on aging, SATSA and Gender. In the narrative analysis, three relationship patterns, labeled ‘nurturing’, ‘draining’, and ‘superficial’, emerged, pointing to qualitative aspects in the co-twin relationship. The dominating aspect was emotional closeness, which differed in the three relationship patterns. In the nurturing twin relationship pattern, emotional closeness was experienced as intimacy and yet independence, while in the draining relationship pattern it was experienced as dependence. The superficial twin relationship was experienced as distant and lacking in emotional involvement. Most of the relationship patterns seemed to remain the same throughout life. However, seen from a life course perspective, this study pointed to complexity and diversity in lifelong twin relationships.

  • 14.
    Rosendahl, Sirpa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Traditional Meals and Sense of At-Homeness -: Finnish Immigrants with Dementia in Bilingual Residential Care in Sweden2019In: ICSS XIX, 12-13 July 2019: 19th International Conference on Social Sciences / [ed] Ahmet Ecirli, European Center for Science, Education and Research , 2019, p. 33-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Rosendahl, Sirpa
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Björklund, Anita
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia
    Department of Behavioral Science and Social work, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    'We are not as alike, as you think' sense of individuality within the co-twin relationship along the life course2013In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have explored how older twins experience and describe themselves in relation to their co-twin. The life stories of 20 older twins were analyzed with narrative analysis.

    Results showed that the twins described themselves from the point of differences in relation to the co-twin. This was based on experiences of how other people viewed them as alike, as well as on life events along the life course, which contributed to the perception of oneself as an individual in relation to the co-twin. The emphasis on unlikeness was therefore interpreted as a way of trying to establish a position as an individual within the co-twin relationship and to assert ones individuality to the rest of the social environment. To claim oneself as an individual was an ongoing identity work along the life course.

  • 16.
    Rosendahl, Sirpa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mattsson, Karin
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal Community College, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS) H1, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Yuwanich, Nuttapol
    School of Nursing Science, Rangsit University, Ptumthani, Thailand.
    Cross-cultural perspectives on gerontology in nursing education: a qualitative study of nurse educators’ experiences2019In: Gerontology & Geriatrics Education, ISSN 0270-1960, E-ISSN 1545-3847Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, USA.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Well-being dialogue: Elderly women’s subjective sense of well-being from their course of life perspective2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, p. Article Number: 19207-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we are concerned with narratives of elderly women’s well-being from their perspectives of the latter parts of their life, living at special housing accommodation (SHA) in the context of Swedish elderly care. In focusing on narratives about well-being, we have a two-fold focus: (1) how the elderly women create their own identity and meaning-making based on lifetime experience; and (2) how narratives of well-being are reflected through the filter of life in situ at the SHA. Based on empirical data consisting of well-being narratives, a dialogical performance analysis was undertaken. The results show how relationships with important persons during various stages of life, and being together and enjoying fellowship with other people as well as enjoying freedom and self-determination, are central aspects of well-being. The conclusions drawn are that the characteristic phenomena of well-being (the what) in the narratives are continuity, identity, and sociality for the elderly person, and this is manifested (the how) as a question of contrasting the state of self-management and self-decline.

  • 18.
    Söderman, Mirkka
    et al.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences and Health Care Education, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna-Västerås, Sweden.
    Pietilä Rosendahl, Sirpa
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences and Health Care Education, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna-Västerås, Sweden.
    Caring for Ethnic Older People Living with Dementia – Experiences of Nursing Staff2016In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 311-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The total number of persons living with dementia is estimated to double every 20 years and ageing migrant populations are growing in several countries. There are gaps in the health and social care of people from other countries, regardless of the efforts made when someone has a dementia diagnosis; similarly, receiving care in sheltered accommodation is less common. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the nursing staff's experiences of caring for non-Swedish speaking persons living with dementia in a Finnish speaking group home in relation to a Swedish speaking group home in Sweden. 27 qualitative semi-structured interviews were analysed using qualitative content analyses. The first main category, "communication", concentrated on language abilities and deficiencies, non-verbal language, highlighting the consequences of not understanding and the benefits of a common language. The second main category, "culturally oriented activities", focused on being served traditional food, celebrating holidays at the group home, the importance of traditions and the importance of familiar music as cultural elements. The Swedish speaking nursing staff could provide qualitative and equitable care, but the challenge was greater for them than for the bilingual nursing staff who spoke the same language as the residents.

  • 19.
    Wongsala, Manothai
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Anbäcken, Els-Marie
    Mälardalen University.
    Rosendahl, Sirpa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lomwong Saansook: Improving Health, Participation and Security Among Thai Older Adults Using PDSA Wheel2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Wongsala, Manothai
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Anbäcken, Els-Marie
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Rosendahl, Sirpa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Perspectives of Health, Participation and Security among Older Adults in Northeastern Thailand2018Conference paper (Other academic)
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