his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Routes and roots to knowing in Shaun White’s snowboarding road trip: A mycorrhizaic approach to multisensory emplaced learning in exergames2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, p. 251-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores learning during game-play of a snowboarding video game intrigued by questions raised in the wake of the increasing mediatisation and digitisation of learning. Correspondingly, we answer to calls for more suitable metaphors for learning to cater for the entangled learning processes that changes related to the increase of digital media may infer. Using a short term sensory ethnography approach, we elaborate on the idea of multisensory emplaced learning and propose an organic metaphor – mycorrhiza – to both methodology and learning. Mycorrhiza refers to a symbiotic relationship between fungi and roots of plants in its environment where fungi are the visible effects of the mycorrhiza. The metaphor provides a way to start to unpack sensory, visual and embodied aspects of learning in the complexities of the digital age. By elaborating on the mycorrhizaic concepts fungus, soil, growth, mycelia and symbiosis we show three interrelated ways of moving through this game: (i) a social and cultural route, (ii) a competitive route, and (iii) an experiential route. With help of the metaphor we discern the symbiotic relations between what appeared in our empirical material as visual and other human and non-human aspects of emplacement.

  • 2.
    Caldeborg, Annica
    et al.
    School of Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Öhman, Marie
    School of Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE2019In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 256-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing anxiety around intergenerational touch in educational settings has both emerged and increased in recent years. Previous research reveals that Physical Education (PE) teachers have become more cautious in their approaches to students and they avoid physical contact or other behavior that could be regarded as suspicious [Fletcher, 2013. Touching practice and physical education: Deconstruction of a contemporary moral panic. Sport, Education and Society, 18(5), 694–709. doi:10.1080/ 13573322.2013.774272; Öhman, 2016. Losing touch—teachers’ selfregulation in physical education. European Physical Education Review, 1–14. doi:10.1177/1356336X15622159; Piper, Garratt, & Taylor, 2013. Child abuse, child protection and defensive ‘touch’ in PE teaching and sports coaching. Sport, Education and Society, 18(5), 583–598. doi:10.1080/13573322.2012.735653]. Some also feel anxious about how physical contact might be perceived by the students. The purpose of this article is to investigate physical contact between teachers and students in PE from a student perspective. This is understood through the didactic contract. For this purpose, focus group interviews using photo elicitation have been conducted with upper secondary school students in Sweden. One of the major findings is that intergenerational touch is purpose bound, that is, physical contact is considered relevant if the teacher has a good intention with using physical contact. The main agreements regarding physical contact as purpose bound are the practical learning and emotional aspects, such as learning new techniques, preventing injury, closeness and encouragement. The didactic contract is in these aspects stable and obvious. The main disagreements are when teachers interfere when the students want to feel capable or when teachers interfere when physical contact is not required in the activity. In these aspects the didactic contract is easily breached. It is also evident that personal preference has an impact on how physical contact is perceived. In conclusion, we can say that physical contact in PE is not a question of appropriate or inappropriate touch in general, but rather an agreement between the people involved about what is expected. Consequently, we should not ban intergenerational touch, but rather focus on teachers’ abilities to deal professionally with the didactic contract regarding physical contact.

  • 3.
    Carlén, Urban
    et al.
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Understanding athletes' online participation: A ticket to qualitative research on online arenas2018In: Digital qualitative research in sport and physical activity / [ed] Andrea Bundon, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 59-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University.
    Exploring gender habits: A practical epistemology analysis of exergaming in school2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1176-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitisation is an ongoing process in society as well as in physical education (PE) and research has identified digital technologies as a trend that influences the PE curriculum. A number of studies have explored the topic from different angles, although very few have empirically looked at the critical aspects of digitised PE in educational practice. This is particularly striking when it comes to issues of gender. Against this background, the aim of the paper is to explore gender habits in a digitised PE practice. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of the pragmatist feminist Shannon Sullivan, is used in the study. The data consists of video- and audio recordings of ongoing video gaming organised by the PE teacher. A practical epistemology analysis (PEA) is employed to explore the teenagers’ gender habits in depth. In the analysis, it is clear that the use of exergames in school reinforces traditional gender habits, rather than weakens them. This is particularly evident when the teenagers play in single sex groups. This is also the case when playing in mixed gender groups, although here some changes in gender habits can be identified. However, gender habits are not easily transformed and the findings support the argument that deliberate teaching is important when issues of gender are raised in practice.

  • 5.
    Mårtensson, Therése
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hälsa och livsstil: En kvalitativ studie inom skolämnet idrott och hälsa2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Worry, anxiety, depression and insomnia has doubled or increased even more the past 20 years among adolescents aged 15-24. Evidence suggests that the school system is not functioning optimally, which may have a negative impact on young people's health. In recent decades, health perspective has come to influence schools physical education, which resulted in a change of the name to physical training and health. This indicates a clearer focus on health. Aim: This study looked at how teachers in physical education are working to give young people knowledge about health. Focus has been on "Health and Lifestyle", a salutogenic approach to health has been used with the theory of SOC. Method: A qualitative approach with semi-structured interviews were used. Results: The teachers of physical education that were interviewed were of the view that health and lifestyle is important but they don’t have enough time or resources for it. Conclusion: This study has provided answers to the question that there are opportunities to work with health issues from a salutogenic perspective in school, provided that sets of values, participation, cooperation and resources for physical education are in place. Further studies are needed to verify these findings.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mindfulness Therapies and Assessment Scales: A Brief Review2016In: International Journal of Psychological Studies, ISSN 1918-7211, E-ISSN 1918-722X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Oudhuis, Margareta
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Vinnande ledarskap: Att organisera för topprestation inom idrottsklubbar2019Book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Rydh, Mathias
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Using the Brain to Help Rehabilitate the Body: Factors which can Affect Injury Rehabilitation Outcome2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity can be beneficial to both physical and mental health, but can also lead to injuries. While injury rehabilitation through physical therapy is mostly focused on physical exercise, there are also other factors, which may influence rehabilitation outcome. The factorsreviewed are: rehabilitation adherence, mindfulness meditation, mental imagery, action observation, self-talk, goal-setting and social support. This essay investigates the neural correlates of these factors, as well as how they can affect rehabilitation outcome and wellbeing, to a lesser degree, during rehabilitation. Among the effects found are performance enhancement, increased self-efficacy, increased pain tolerance, increased motivation and reduced strength loss. Suggestions for future research is also provided.

  • 9.
    Timpka, Toomas
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Bickenbach, Jerome
    Department of Philosophy, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
    Finch, Caroline F.
    Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Federation University Australia, Ballarat, VIC, Australia.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Nordenfelt, Lennart
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    What is a Sports Injury?2014In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 423-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current sports injury reporting systems lack a common conceptual basis. We propose a conceptual foundation as a basis for the recording of health problems associated with participation in sports, based on the notion of impairment used by the World Health Organization. We provide definitions of sports impairment concepts to represent the perspectives of health services, the participants in sports and physical exercise themselves, and sports institutions. For each perspective, the duration of the causative event is used as the norm for separating concepts into those denoting impairment conditions sustained instantly and those developing gradually over time. Regarding sports impairment sustained in isolated events, sports injury denotes the loss of bodily function or structure that is the object of observations in clinical examinations; sports trauma is defined as an immediate sensation of pain, discomfort or loss of functioning that is the object of athlete self-evaluations; and sports incapacity is the sidelining of an athlete because of a health evaluation made by a legitimate sports authority that is the object of time loss observations. Correspondingly, sports impairment caused by excessive bouts of physical exercise is denoted as sports disease (overuse syndrome) when observed by health service professionals during clinical examinations, sports illness when observed by the athlete in self-evaluations, and sports sickness when recorded as time loss from sports participation by a sports body representative. We propose a concerted development effort in this area that takes advantage of concurrent ontology management resources and involves the international sporting community in building terminology systems that have broad relevance.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf