Högskolan i Skövde

his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alonso-Calvete, Alejandra
    et al.
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Lorenzo-Martínez, Miguel
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain ; Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Faculty of Sports Sciences and Physical Education, Campus Bastiagueiro, University of A Coruña, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment. REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian
    CLINURSID Research Group, Psychiatry, Radiology, Public Health, Nursing and Medicine Department, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain ; Faculty of Education Sciences, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain ; Simulation and Intensive Care Unit of Santiago (SICRUS) Reseach Group, Health Research Institute of Santiago, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela-CHUS, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    REMOSS Research Group, Facultade de Ciencias da Educación e do Deporte, Universidade de Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Does Vibration Foam Roller Influence Performance and Recovery?: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis2022In: Sports Medicine - Open, ISSN 2199-1170, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 32Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Foam rolling has been extensively investigated, showing benefits in performance and recovery. Recently, vibration has been added to foam rollers, with hypothesized advantages over conventional foam rollers. However, there is no systematic evidence in this regard.

    Objective: To carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis about the effects of vibration foam roller (VFR) on performance and recovery.

    Methods: A systematic search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science and SportDiscus according to the PRISMA guidelines. The outcomes included performance (jump, agility and strength) and recovery variables (blood flow, pain and fatigue) measured after an intervention with VFR. The methodological quality was assessed with the PEDro scale. A random-effects model was used to perform the meta-analysis.

    Results: Initially, 556 studies were found and after the eligibility criteria 10 studies were included in the systematic review and 9 in the meta-analysis. There was no significant effects on jump performance (SMD = 0.14 [95% CI − 0.022 to 0.307]; p = 0.101; I2 = 1.08%) and no significant beneficial effects were reported on isokinetic strength (SMD = 0.16 [95% CI − 0.041 to 0.367]; p = 0.117; I2 = 9.7%). Recovery appears to be enhanced after VFR interventions, but agility does not seem to increase after VFR interventions.

    Conclusion: This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that VFR could have great potential for increasing jump performance, agility, strength and enhancing recovery. Further research is needed to confirm the effects of VFR on performance and recovery.

    Trial Registration This investigation was registered in PROSPERO with the code CRD42021238104.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Barcala-Furelos, Roberto
    et al.
    REMOSS Research Group, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain ; CLINURSID Network Research, Department of Psychiatry, Radiology and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    González-Represas, Alicia
    Department of Functional Biology and Health Sciences, Physical Therapy Faculty, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    REMOSS Research Group, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Martínez-Rodríguez, Alicia
    Department of Physiotherapy, Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Universidade da Coruña, La Coruña, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    REMOSS Research Group, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Marques, Olga
    Faculty of Sports Sciences and Physical Education, University of Coimbra, Portugal ; Research Unit for Sport and Physical Activity (CIDAF), Coimbra, Portugal.
    Rama, Luís
    Faculty of Sports Sciences and Physical Education, University of Coimbra, Portugal ; Research Unit for Sport and Physical Activity (CIDAF), Coimbra, Portugal.
    Is Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation a Tool for Recovery after a Water Rescue?: A Cross-Over Study with Lifeguards2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 16, article id 5854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to evaluate the degree to which transcutaneous electrical stimulation (ES) enhanced recovery following a simulated water rescue. Twenty-six lifeguards participated in this study. The rescue consisted of swimming 100 m with fins and rescue-tube: 50 m swim approach and 50 m tow-in a simulated victim. Blood lactate clearance, rated perceived effort (RPE), and muscle contractile properties were evaluated at baseline, after the water rescue, and after ES or passive-recovery control condition (PR) protocol. Tensiomiography, RPE, and blood lactate basal levels indicated equivalence between both groups. There was no change in tensiomiography from pre to post-recovery and no difference between recovery protocols. Overall-RPE, legs-RPE and arms-RPE after ES (mean ± SD; 2.7 ± 1.53, 2.65 ± 1.66, and 2.30 ± 1.84, respectively) were moderately lower than after PR (3.57 ± 2.4, 3.71 ± 2.43, and 3.29 ± 1.79, respectively) (p = 0.016, p = 0.010, p = 0.028, respectively). There was a significantly lower blood lactate level after recovery in ES than in PR (mean ± SD; 4.77 ± 1.86 mmol·L−1 vs. 6.27 ± 3.69 mmol·L−1; p = 0.045). Low-frequency ES immediately after a water rescue is an effective recovery strategy to clear out blood lactate concentration.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Breau, Becky
    et al.
    Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Canada ; Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany ; Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Brandes, Mirko
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Aragón (IIS Aragón) Zaragoza, Spain ; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Lissner, Lauren
    School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Lauria, Fabio
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany ; Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Buck, Christoph
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany .
    I.Family consortia, (Contributor)
    Longitudinal association of childhood physical activity and physical fitness with physical activity in adolescence: insights from the IDEFICS/I.Family study2022In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study aimed to examine associations of early childhood physical fitness and physical activity (PA) with PA during later childhood/early adolescence while accounting for gender differences. Methods: We selected data of N = 4329 children from the IDEFICS/I. Family cohort (age 2.4–11.7 years) with data on baseline fitness and accelerometer measurements. At baseline, physical fitness tests were conducted including Flamingo balance, Backsaver sit and reach, Handgrip strength, Standing Long Jump, 40-m sprint and 20-m Shuttle run (to estimate cardio-respiratory fitness levels). PA was measured with Actigraph accelerometers over 3 days at baseline (ActiTrainer or GT1M) and 7 days at follow-up (GT3X). Evenson cutpoints were used to determine moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) time, and children with ≥60mins/day of average MVPA were deemed as having met WHO guidelines at baseline and follow-up. Linear and logistic regressions were performed to examine longitudinal associations between meeting WHO guidelines, MVPA, and physical fitness tests at baseline with meeting WHO guidelines and MVPA at follow-up. Models were conducted on the entire sample, the sex-stratified sample, and stratified by sex and pubertal status at follow-up. Results: Results showed that meeting WHO guidelines for MVPA at baseline was positively associated with MVPA (Standardized Beta (B) = 0.13, 95%CI:(5.6;11.1)) and meeting WHO guidelines at follow-up for the entire sample (OR = 2.1, 95%CI:(1.5; 3.14), and stratified by males (OR = 2.5, 95%CI:(1.5; 4.1)) and females (OR = 1.8, 95%CI:(1.0; 3.2)). This was also found for both male pre/early pubertal and pubertal groups but only in the female pre/early pubertal group, and not the female pubertal group (MVPA: B =.00, 95%CI:(− 6.1; 5.6), WHO: OR = 0.61, 95%CI:(0.23;1.6)). Models indicated that Standing Long jump, 40-m sprint, Shuttle run and Flamingo balance at baseline were associated with MVPA and meeting the guidelines at follow-up. Conclusions: Meeting WHO guidelines and certain fitness tests at baseline were strongly associated with MVPA and meeting WHO guidelines at follow-up, but this association varied with sex and pubertal status. Consequently, these findings underline the importance of ensuring sufficient physical activity in terms of quality and quantity for children at the earliest stages of life. Trial registration: ISRCTN62310987. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Buck, Christoph
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology, BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lauria, Fabio
    National Research Council, Institute of Food Sciences, Avellino, Italy.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Page, Angie
    Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, School for Policy Studies, Bristol, United Kingdom / NIHR Bristol Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, University of Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology, BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Faculty of Mathematics/Computer Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology, BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Faculty of Mathematics/Computer Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Urban Moveability and physical activity in children: Longitudinal results from the IDEFICS and I.Family cohort2019In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity (PA) is one of the major protective behaviours to prevent non-communicable diseases. Positive effects of the built environment on PA are well investigated, although evidence of this association is mostly based on cross-sectional studies. The present study aims to investigate the longitudinal effects of built environment characteristics in terms of a moveability index on PA of children in their transition phase to adolescence using data of the IDEFICS/I.Family cohort. Methods: We used data on 3394 accelerometer measurements of 2488 children and adolescents aged 3 to 15 years old from survey centres of three countries, Germany, Italy, and Sweden, who participated in up to three surveys over 6 years. In network-dependent home neighbourhoods, a moveability index was calculated based on residential density, land use mix, street connectivity, availability of public transport and public open spaces such as green spaces and public playgrounds in order to quantify opportunities for PA of children and adolescents. Linear trajectories of light PA (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) were estimated using linear mixed models accounting for repeated measurements nested within individuals. Least squares means were estimated to quantify differences in trajectories over age. Results: LPA and MVPA declined annually with age by approximately 20 min/day and 2 min/day respectively. In girls, the moveability index showed a consistent significantly positive effect on MVPA (β $ \hat{\beta} $ = 2.14, 95% CI: (0.11; 4.16)) for all ages, while in boys the index significantly lessened the decline in LPA with age for each year. (β $ \hat{\beta} $ = 2.68, 95% CI: (0.46; 4.90)). Availability of public open spaces was more relevant for MVPA in girls and LPA in boys during childhood, whereas in adolescence, residential density and intersection density became more important. Conclusion: Built environment characteristics are important determinants of PA and were found to have a supportive effect that ameliorates the decline in PA during the transition phase from childhood to adolescence. In childhood environmental support for leisure time PA through public open spaces was found to be the most protective factor whereas in adolescence the positive influence of street connectivity and residential density was most supportive of physical activity. © 2019 The Author(s).

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Routes and roots to knowing in Shaun White’s snowboarding road trip: A mycorrhizaic approach to multisensory emplaced learning in exergames2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, p. 251-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores learning during game-play of a snowboarding video game intrigued by questions raised in the wake of the increasing mediatisation and digitisation of learning. Correspondingly, we answer to calls for more suitable metaphors for learning to cater for the entangled learning processes that changes related to the increase of digital media may infer. Using a short term sensory ethnography approach, we elaborate on the idea of multisensory emplaced learning and propose an organic metaphor – mycorrhiza – to both methodology and learning. Mycorrhiza refers to a symbiotic relationship between fungi and roots of plants in its environment where fungi are the visible effects of the mycorrhiza. The metaphor provides a way to start to unpack sensory, visual and embodied aspects of learning in the complexities of the digital age. By elaborating on the mycorrhizaic concepts fungus, soil, growth, mycelia and symbiosis we show three interrelated ways of moving through this game: (i) a social and cultural route, (ii) a competitive route, and (iii) an experiential route. With help of the metaphor we discern the symbiotic relations between what appeared in our empirical material as visual and other human and non-human aspects of emplacement.

  • 6.
    Caldeborg, Annica
    et al.
    School of Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Öhman, Marie
    School of Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE2019In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 256-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing anxiety around intergenerational touch in educational settings has both emerged and increased in recent years. Previous research reveals that Physical Education (PE) teachers have become more cautious in their approaches to students and they avoid physical contact or other behavior that could be regarded as suspicious [Fletcher, 2013. Touching practice and physical education: Deconstruction of a contemporary moral panic. Sport, Education and Society, 18(5), 694–709. doi:10.1080/ 13573322.2013.774272; Öhman, 2016. Losing touch—teachers’ selfregulation in physical education. European Physical Education Review, 1–14. doi:10.1177/1356336X15622159; Piper, Garratt, & Taylor, 2013. Child abuse, child protection and defensive ‘touch’ in PE teaching and sports coaching. Sport, Education and Society, 18(5), 583–598. doi:10.1080/13573322.2012.735653]. Some also feel anxious about how physical contact might be perceived by the students. The purpose of this article is to investigate physical contact between teachers and students in PE from a student perspective. This is understood through the didactic contract. For this purpose, focus group interviews using photo elicitation have been conducted with upper secondary school students in Sweden. One of the major findings is that intergenerational touch is purpose bound, that is, physical contact is considered relevant if the teacher has a good intention with using physical contact. The main agreements regarding physical contact as purpose bound are the practical learning and emotional aspects, such as learning new techniques, preventing injury, closeness and encouragement. The didactic contract is in these aspects stable and obvious. The main disagreements are when teachers interfere when the students want to feel capable or when teachers interfere when physical contact is not required in the activity. In these aspects the didactic contract is easily breached. It is also evident that personal preference has an impact on how physical contact is perceived. In conclusion, we can say that physical contact in PE is not a question of appropriate or inappropriate touch in general, but rather an agreement between the people involved about what is expected. Consequently, we should not ban intergenerational touch, but rather focus on teachers’ abilities to deal professionally with the didactic contract regarding physical contact.

  • 7.
    Carlén, Urban
    et al.
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Understanding athletes' online participation: A ticket to qualitative research on online arenas2018In: Digital qualitative research in sport and physical activity / [ed] Andrea Bundon, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 59-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Cheng, Lan
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Lauria, Fabio
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Chadjigeorgiou, Charalambos
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Michels, Nathalie
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Genud (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBERObn), University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Page, Angie S.
    Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Pitsiladis, Yannis
    Collaborating Centre of Sports Medicine, University of Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between physical activity, sedentary behaviour and bone stiffness index across weight status in European children and adolescents2020In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The associations between physical activity (PA), sedentary behaviour (SB) and bone health may be differentially affected by weight status during growth. This study aims to assess the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between PA, SB and bone stiffness index (SI) in European children and adolescents, taking the weight status into consideration. Methods: Calcaneus SI was first measured by quantitative ultrasound among children aged 2-9 years old in 2007/08. It was measured again after 2 years in the IDEFICS study and after 6 years in the I. Family study. A sample of 2008 participants with time spent at sports clubs, watching TV and playing computer/games self-reported by questionnaire, and a subsample of 1037 participants with SB, light PA (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) objectively measured using Actigraph accelerometers were included in the analyses. Weight status was defined as thin/normal and overweight/obese according to the extended International Obesity Task Force criteria. Linear mixed-effects models were used to estimate the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between PA, SB and SI percentiles, stratified by weight status. Results: The cross-sectional association between weekly duration of watching TV and SI percentiles was negative in thin/normal weight group (β =-0.35, p = 0.008). However, baseline weekly duration of watching TV (β =-0.63, p = 0.021) and change after 2 years (β =-0.63, p = 0.022) as well as the change in weekly duration of playing computer/games after 6 years (β =-0.75, p = 0.019) were inversely associated with corresponding changes in SI percentiles in overweight/obese group. Change in time spent at sports clubs was positively associated with change in SI percentiles after 2 years (β = 1.28, p = 0.001), with comparable effect sizes across weight status. In the subsample with accelerometer data, we found a positive cross-sectional association between MVPA and SI percentiles in thin/normal weight group. Baseline MVPA predicted changes in SI percentiles after 2 and 6 years in all groups. Conclusions: Our results suggested the beneficial effect of PA on SI. However, the increasing durations of screen-based SB might be risk factors for SI development, especially in overweight/obese children and adolescents. © 2020 The Author(s).

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kowalski, Jan
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Sverker
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Renström, Per A.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Injury patterns in Swedish elite athletics: Annual incidence, injury types and risk factors2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 15, p. 941-952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To estimate the incidence, type and severity of musculoskeletal injuries in youth and adult elite athletics athletes and to explore risk factors for sustaining injuries. Design: Prospective cohort study conducted during a 52-week period. Setting: Male and female youth and adult athletics athletes ranked in the top 10 in Sweden (n=292). Results: 199 (68%) athletes reported an injury during the study season. Ninety-six per cent of the reported injuries were non-traumatic (associated with overuse). Most injuries (51%) were severe, causing a period of absence from normal training exceeding 3 weeks. Log-rank tests revealed risk differences with regard to athlete category (p=0.046), recent previous injury (>3 weeks time-loss; p=0.039) and training load rank index (TLRI; p=0.019). Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that athletes in the third (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.78) and fourth TLRI quartiles (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.74) had almost a twofold increased risk of injury compared with their peers in the first quartile and interaction effects between athlete category and previous injury; youth male athletes with a previous serious injury had more than a fourfold increased risk of injury (HR=4.39; 95% CI 2.20 to 8.77) compared with youth females with no previous injury. Conclusions: The injury incidence among both youth and adult elite athletics athletes is high. A training load index combing hours and intensity and a history of severe injury the previous year were predictors for injury. Further studies on measures to quantify training content and protocols for safe return to athletics are warranted. © 2013 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine.

  • 10.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment. Department of Special Didactics, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain.
    Bisagno, Elisa
    Department of Law, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    Musculus, Lisa
    Department of Performance Psychology, Institute of Psychology, German Sport University Cologne, Germany.
    Raab, Markus
    Department of Performance Psychology, Institute of Psychology, German Sport University Cologne, Germany ; School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, UK.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    Department of Special Didactics, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain ; Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Williams, A. Mark
    Department of Health and Kinesiology, College of Health, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA ; .
    Araújo, Duarte
    CIPER, Faculdade de Motricidade Humana, Departamento de Desporto e Saúde, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Physical Activity and Health, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Department of Health and Sport, School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Sweden ; Department of Sport Science and Physical Education, University of Agder, Norway.
    The role of domain-specific and domain-general cognitive functions and skills in sports performance: A meta-analysis2021In: Psychological bulletin, ISSN 0033-2909, E-ISSN 1939-1455, Vol. 147, no 12, p. 1290-1308Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognition plays a key role in sports performance. This meta-analytic review synthesizes research that examined the relationship between cognitive functions, skills, and sports performance. We identified literature by searching Cochrane Library, APA PsycINFO, PubMed, and Web of Science. We included studies conducted on competitive athletes, assessed cognitive prerequisites, and included performance measures related to the sport. Of the 9,433 screened records, 136 reports were included, containing 142 studies, 1,227 effect sizes, and 8,860 participants. Only 11 studies used a prospective study design. The risk of bias was assessed using the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Nonrandomized Studies. The multilevel meta-analysis showed a medium effect size for the overall difference in cognitive functions and skills, with higher skilled athletes scoring better than lower skilled athletes (Hedges’ g = 0.59, 95% CI [0.49, 0.69]). The moderator analysis showed larger effect size for tests of cognitive decision-making skills (g = 0.77, 95% CI [0.6, 0.94]) compared to basic (g = 0.39, 95% CI [0.21, 0.56]) and higher cognitive functions (g = 0.44, 95% CI [0.26, 0.62]), as well as larger effect for sport-specific task stimuli compared to general ones. We report that higher skilled athletes perform better on cognitive function tests than lower skilled athletes. There was insufficient evidence to determine whether cognitive functions and skills can predict future sport performance. We found no evidence to support claims that tests of general cognitive functions, such as executive functioning, should be used by practitioners for talent identification or player selection.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Lundkvist, Erik
    Performance and Training Unit, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Center of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport, Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    CiberObn. Unit of Pediatric Nutrition and Metabolism, University Clinical Hospital of Santiago, RG Pediatric Nutrition (IDIS-CHUS), Santiago de Compostela, Spain ; Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    The influence of initial selection age, relative age effect and country long-term performance on the re-selection process in European basketball youth national teams2021In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 388-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to: (a) analyse the re-selection patterns in European youth basketball national teams, and (b) investigate how the chance of re-selection is influenced by the initial selection age and relative age of the players, as well as the long-term performance of the country at the youth level. The sample consisted of 8362 basketball players (5038 men, 3324 women) born 1988–1997 who have participated in at least one U16, U18 or U20 European youth basketball championship between 2004 and 2017. The results from the survival analysis showed that around 75% of male and 80% of female players participating in a championship were re-selected the following year. Also, initial selection age, relative age effect, and the country long-term performance influenced the re-selection rates, with relationships being different between men and women. To conclude, the results of the present study show that the re-selection process by which players progress in European youth national basketball teams is complex and influenced by several different factors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    University of Vigo, Spain.
    Musculus, Lisa
    German Sport University Cologne, Germany.
    Bisagno, Elisa
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Can tests of cognitive functions or decision making predict sport performance in net and invasion sports?: A meta-analysis2021In: Abstract Band Talententwicklung & Coaching im Sport: 53. Jahrestagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Sportpsychologie (asp) Tübingen (online, 13.-15.05.2021) / [ed] Oliver Höner; Svenja Wachsmuth; Martin Leo Reinhard; Florian Schultz, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen , 2021, p. 90-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the psychological factors that have been suggested to influence athletes’ success is their cognitive prerequisites. Recent literature has investigated how sports performance is related to basic cognitive functions (e.g., processing speed and attention), higher cognitive functions (e.g., working memory capacity and inhibition), as well as cognitive skills (e.g., decision making). This research has lead to the—potentially premature—commercialization of products measuring cognitive functions or skills to identify and select talented athletes. The purpose of this meta-analysis was, therefore, to synthesize the research that has examined the relationship between cognitive skills and functions and sporting performance in net and invasion game athletes. Further, we aimed to estimate the ability of cognitive tests to dis- criminate between athletes with better and worse sporting performance. A literature search was performed in Cochrane library, PsychInfo, Pubmed, and Web of Science. We included studies if they were conducted on competitive athletes in net and invasion sports, assessed cognitive prerequisites, and included an individual performance measure related to the sport. 

    Thirty-nine studies, with a total of 3438 athletes, met the criteria. The results showed a small effect size for basic (Hedge’s g = 0.43, 95% CI [0.09, 0.75]) and higher cognitive functions (Hedge’s g = 0.29, 95% CI [0.00, 0.62]), and a large effect size for decision making (Hedge’s g = 1.07, 95% CI [0.70, 1.42]); meaning athletes with better sport performance scored higher than athletes with worse sport performance. The probability of superiority indicated that an athlete with better sports performance would outscore an athlete with worse sports performance 63 of 100 times (95% CI [57, 70]) on basic cognitive function tests, 59 of 100 times (95% CI [53, 66]) on higher cognitive function tests, and 78 of 100 times (95% CI [72, 84]) on decision making tests. 

    In conclusion, we found that tests of basic and higher cognitive functions had some ability to differentiate between athletes with better and worse sports performance in net and invasion sports on a group level. However, basic and higher cognitive function tests do not seem to be able to predict sports performance on an individual level. Meanwhile, we found that tests of decision making had the best ability to differentiate between athletes with better and worse sports performance on a group level, and some ability to predict the sport performance on an individual level.

  • 13.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Lundkvist, Erik
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    Unit of Investigation in Human Nutrition, Growth and Development of Galicia (GALINUT), University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Talent Selection Strategies and Relationship With Success in European Basketball National Team Programs2021In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 666839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited knowledge of the talent selection strategies used by national sporting organizations to identify and develop talented players in basketball. Therefore, we aimed to explore differences in selection strategies between European youth basketball national team (NT) programs, and how they relate to the program’s success. Specifically, we examined differences in the number of youth NT players and within-country variance in the 1988–1999 generations between 38 countries (n men = 38, women = 32). Further, we tested if the number of youth NT players and within-country variance was related to the NTs senior ranking, youth ranking, and youth-to-senior player promotion, using generalized Bayesian multilevel models. We further checked the moderating effect of the amount of licensed basketball players in each country. On average, 15.6 ± 2.0 male and 12.4 ± 1.8 female players were selected per generation. Over a third of the NTs consistently selected a higher or lower number of players than the average, with a difference of 8.1 players (95% CI [5.8, 10.8]) for men and 7.6 players (95% CI [5.4, 10.0]) for women between the countries with the highest and lowest average. When licensed players were used as moderator, the differences decreased but did not disappear, in both genders. There was an above 99.3% probability that a higher number of players was positively related to higher men’s senior and youth rankings, and women’s youth ranking. Within countries, generations with a higher number of youth players generated more senior players, with a probability of 98.4% on the men’s, and 97.3% on the women’s side. When licensed players were used as moderator, the probabilities for these relationships remained largely unaffected, apart from women’s youth ranking, which sank to 80.5%. In conclusion, the selection strategy in basketball NT programs varies between European countries and selecting a higher number of players possibly relates to better long-term performance and more players promoted to the senior NTs. These findings show that talent development programs should make conscious decisions about their selection strategies as it can affect their success.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Barcala-Furelos, Roberto
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain ; CLINURSID Research Group, Psychiatry, Radiology and Public Health Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain ; Institute of Research of Santiago (IDIS), Spain ; International Drowning Research Alliance–IDRA, Río de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Fernández-Méndez, María
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Prieto, Jose A.
    Faculty Padre Ossó, University of Oviedo, Spain.
    Ríos-Ave, Andrés
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian
    REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain ; CLINURSID Research Group, Psychiatry, Radiology and Public Health Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain ; Institute of Research of Santiago (IDIS), Spain ; Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    How can lifeguards recover better? A cross-over study comparing resting, running, and foam rolling2017In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1887-1891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of active recovery in form of running or foam rolling on clearing blood lactate compared to remain sitting after a water rescue.

    Method: A quasi experimental cross-over design was used to test the effectiveness of two active recovery methods: foam rolling (FR) and running (RR), compared with passive recovery (PR) on the blood lactate clearance after performing a water rescue. Twelve lifeguards from Marín (Pontevedra) completed the study. The participants performed a 100-meter water rescue and a 25-minute recovery protocol.

    Results: The post recovery lactate levels were significantly lower for foam rolling (4.4 ± 1.5 mmol/l, P = 0.005, d = 0.94) and running (4.9 ± 2.3 mmol/l, P = 0.027, d = 1.21) compared with resting (7.2 ± 2.5 mmol/l); there was no significant difference between foam rolling and running (P = 1.000).

    Conclusions: We found that surf lifesavers clear out blood lactate more efficient when performing an active recovery protocol. Foam rolling is an effective method of increasing the rate of blood lactate clearance. These two recovery methods are also adequate for surf lifeguards as they do not interfere with the surveillance aspect of their job.

  • 15.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain ; CiberObn. Unit of Pediatric Nutrition and Metabolism, University Clinical Hospital of Santiago, RG Pediatric Nutrition (IDIS-CHUS), Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Costa, Pablo B.
    Human Performance Laboratory, Center for Sport Performance, Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Fullerton, CA, USA.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Effects of age on physical and technical performance in National Basketball Association (NBA) players2021In: Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal, ISSN 1543-8627, E-ISSN 1543-8635, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 277-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the effects of age on physical and technical game performance for different positions in professional basketball players. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 25,523 individual match observations were undertaken on players from the 2018–19 NBA season. The players were classified into four age groups (19–22 years, 23–25 years, 26–29 years, and 30–42 years). Differences in physical and technical match performance were analysed for the following variables: distance covered, average speed, minutes played, points scored and playing efficiency. The results showed that players older than 30 covered shorter distance and had lower average speed than younger players, that guards and forwards older than 26 played more minutes per game than younger ones, and that guards older than 26 scored more points and were more efficient than younger one, while centres age 23–25 scored more points per games than centres older than 30. In conclusion, physical performance declined with age, and while playing time and technical performance generally remained stable or increased, especially for guards. However, there was some evidence of decline for centres.

  • 16.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Senior and youth national team competitive experience: influence on player and team performance in European basketball championships2017In: International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, ISSN 2474-8668, E-ISSN 1474-8185, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 832-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to discover if the number of previous senior and youth national team championships played relates to the team and player performance at the European basketball championships. The sample consisted of all national teams and their players participating in the 2011, 2013 and 2015 European Championships for men (teams n = 72; players n = 697) and women (teams n = 52, players = 520). The teams were classified into four groups based on their highest stage reached in the tournament. A k-means cluster was used to group the players as high, medium or low performers according to their efficiency rating. The number of previous senior and youth championships was compared between groups. Better performing teams and players had a higher number of previous senior championships. The competitive experience differentiates low performing players for both genders, but only distinguishes high from medium performing players for women. No differences in the number of youth championships were found. It appears to be critical to have a sufficient amount of accumulated senior competitive experience within the team to reach the semi-final phase both for men’s and women’s national teams.

  • 17.
    Kalén, Anton
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    de Rellán-Guerra, Alejandro Sal
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Lago-Peñas, Carlos
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Are Soccer Players Older Now Than Before?: Aging Trends and Market Value in the Last Three Decades of the UEFA Champions League2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the current study were to analyze the evolution of players’ age in the UEFA Champions League since the start of its modern-day format in 1992–1993 up until 2017–2018 and to determine how the players’ age relates to their market value. The sample consisted of all players participating in the UEFA Champions League from the 1992–1993 to 2017–2018 seasons (n = 16062). The following variables were used in this study: players’ age, number of seasons in the club, number of Champions Leagues won, team performance, and market value of the player in the season. Data were examined using a one-way ANOVA and a linear regression. The main finding of the current study is that an aging trend has occurred in the last three decades in the Champions League. A significant increase in average players’ age (>1.6 years) was observed, rising from an age of 24.9 to 26.5 years. Goalkeepers and Center Backs tend to peak later than attackers, and their peak performance can last until an age of about 31 years. Finally, an inverted-U curve defines the association between market value and age, with peak value appearing in the 26–30 age range. These results provide useful information regarding at which age soccer players are likely to perform at the highest level, as well as the age they are likely to have the highest market value.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Lago-Peñas, Carlos
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Lorenzo-Martinez, Miguel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    López-Del Campo, Roberto
    Department of Competitions and Mediacoach, LaLiga, Madrid, Spain.
    Resta, Ricardo
    Department of Competitions and Mediacoach, LaLiga, Madrid, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Do elite soccer players cover longer distance when losing?: Differences between attackers and defenders2021In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 840-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects playing position, match location (home or away), quality of opposition (strong or weak), effective playing time (total time minus stoppages), and score-line on physical match performance in professional soccer players using a large-scale analysis. A total of 10,739 individual match observations of outfield players competing in the Spanish La Liga during the 2018–2019 season were recorded using a computerized tracking system (TRACAB, Chyronhego, New York, USA). The players were classified into five positions (central defenders, players = 94; external defenders, players = 82; central midfielders, players = 101; external midfielders, players = 72; and forwards, players = 67) and the following match running performance categories were considered: total distance covered, low-speed running (LSR) distance (0–14 km · h−1), medium-speed running (MSR) distance (14–21 km · h−1), high-speed running (HSR) distance (>21 km · h−1), very HSR (VHSR) distance (21–24 km · h−1), sprint distance (>24 km · h−1) Overall, match running performance was highly dependent on situational variables, especially the score-line condition (winning, drawing, losing). Moreover, the score-line affected players running performance differently depending on their playing position. Losing status increased the total distance and the distance covered at MSR, HSR, VHSR and Sprint by defenders, while attacking players showed the opposite trend. These findings may help coaches and managers to better understand the effects of situational variables on physical performance in La Liga and could be used to develop a model for predicting the physical activity profile in competition.

  • 19.
    Lago-Peñas, Carlos
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    How does Video Assistant Referee (VAR) modify the game in elite soccer?2019In: International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, ISSN 2474-8668, E-ISSN 1474-8185, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 646-653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine how the introduction of the VAR system influenced the play in elite soccer. The sample consists of 1024 matches played in the Italian Serie A and the German Bundesliga league during the seasons before and after the implementation of the VAR system. The following variables were recorded for each match: Fouls, Goals, Offsides, Penalties, Playing time in the first half, Playing time in the second half, Total Playing time, Red cards and Yellow cards. Match statistics were retrieved from the website of “Whoscored” (www.whoscored.com). A generalized linear model and a pairwise z-tests were used to compare seasons before and after the implementation of the VAR. There was a decrease in the number of offsides, fouls and yellow cards after the implementation of the VAR. Meanwhile, there was an increase in the number of minutes added to the playing time in the first half and the full game, but not in the second half. These findings may help coaches, players and managers to better understand the effects of the VAR system on professional soccer and to identify strategies to improve refereeing during matches.

  • 20.
    Lind, Philip
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    Ljuddesignen i tävlingsinriktade spel och dess påverkan på prestation: Hur påverkar förändrad ljuddesign spelarprestation i CS:GO?2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    6 personer deltog i en undersökning där ljuddesignen i Counter Strike: Global Offensive (2012) modifierades för att undersöka om deltagarnas prestation förändrades på grund av detta. En fördjupning i informativ ljuddesign i digitala spel utförs i rapporten med syfte att ge modifieringen stöd, då de ljud som förändrades var de mest informativa ljuden i spelet. Undersökningens frågeställning är ”Hur påverkar förändrad ljuddesign spelarprestation i CS:GO?”. Deltagarna spelade 5 rundor mot datorstyrda bottar i en icke modifierad samt en modifierad version av spelet. Därefter svarade de på en enkät där svaren sedan diskuterades i individuella intervjuer. Resultatet av studien visade på att den förändrade ljuddesignen påverkade deltagarnas prestation men att det var den initiala reaktionen till det nya ljuden som hindrade dem från att prestera som vanligt. Testets utformning behöver likna en normaliserad spelsession av Counter Strike: Global Offensive (2012) för att korrekt mäta huruvida spelarprestationen påverkas av ljuddesignen.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Lorenzo-Martinez, Miguel
    et al.
    Faculty of Educacion and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Educacion and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Educacion and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    López-Del Campo, Roberto
    Department of Competitions and Mediacoah, LaLiga, Madrid, Spain.
    Resta, Ricardo
    Department of Competitions and Mediacoah, LaLiga, Madrid, Spain.
    Lago-Peñas, Carlos
    Faculty of Educacion and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Do elite soccer players cover less distance when their team spent more time in possession of the ball?2021In: Science and medicine in football, ISSN 2473-3938, E-ISSN 2473-4446, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 310-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the association between the time spent in possession by teams and the match-running performance in elite soccer matches.

    Methods: Match performance data were collected from players in Spanish LaLiga (8,468 individual match observations of 412 outfield players) using a multiple-camera computerised tracking system. A k-means cluster analyses classified teams depending on time spent in possession of the ball: very high-percentage ball possession teams (VHPBPT), high-percentage ball possession teams (HPBPT), low-percentage ball possession teams (LPBPT) and very low-percentage ball possession teams (VLPBPT).

    Results: Overall, physical indicators were highly associated with ball possession. Distances covered in VHPBPT were lower than HPBPT, LPBPT and VLPBPT, especially at low and medium speed. Position-specific changes were also evident for physical profiles. Attackers (central midfielders, external midfielders and forwards) in VHPBPT covered fewer meters per minute at any speed than their counterparts in HPBPT, LPBPT or VLPBPT. However, defenders (Central defenders and External defenders) in VLPBPT covered lower distances.

    Conclusion: These findings may have a great deal of practical implications and may help coaches to better understand match-running variations according to ball possession strategies and could be used to develop a model for predicting the physical activity profile in competition.

  • 22.
    Lundkvist, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Department of Educational Studies, Karlstad University, Sweden ; Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway.
    Madigan, Daniel
    School of Science, Technology and Health, York St John University, York, United Kingdom.
    Hjälm, Sören
    School of Health Sciences, School of Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kalén, Anton
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment. Faculty of Education Sciences & Sports, Vigo University, Galicia, Spain.
    The Prevalence of Emotional Exhaustion in Professional and Semiprofessional Coaches2023In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, E-ISSN 1932-927X, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 376-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined levels of emotional exhaustion, a key symptom of burnout, in Swedish professional and semiprofessional sport coaches in comparison to the normative values specified in the Maslach Burnout Inventory manual, and to the clinical cutoffs developed by Kleijweg, Verbraak, and Van Dijk. The sample contained 318 Swedish coaches (M age = 42.7 years, 12% female) working at least 50% full time away from both team (60%) and individual (40%) sports. Our study shows that, in general, coaches in this sample experience lower average levels of exhaustion than normative samples both regarding the Maslach Burnout Inventory and clinical cutoffs. Two groups of coaches did, however, stand out. Coaches living in single households as well as coaches working part time had higher risk of severe levels of emotional exhaustion. These results place coach exhaustion levels in relation to other occupations and highlight that in this sample, the coaching profession does not stand out as more emotionally exhausting than other occupations.

  • 23.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden ; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Environing as Embodied Experience - A Study of Outdoor Education as Part of Physical Education2021In: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 3, p. 1-12, article id 768295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of a re-understanding or re-investigation of body pedagogy is currently prominent in the field of physical education (PE) and sport pedagogy. This goes for the learning of movement capability and health but also in relation to outdoor education (OE). The latter a criticized area for having a one-size-fits-all approach to curriculum, with less attention to what to learn in OE, including aspects of everyday practices of being outdoors. The aim of this study was to explore students aged 15 years, and their meaning making of being outdoors expressed in written stories about a favorite place. Two school year eight classes in a Swedish compulsory school situated in an area with high diversity participated. Through this theory-generated empirical study, written stories were explored as one way of evaluating students' meaning making of outdoor places. By using practical epistemology analysis (PEA) to examine experience operationalized through aesthetic judgements attention is paid to the relation between the student and the situation (their favorite place). The analysis make it possible to discern a sense and meaning making of “being” outdoors as an embodied experience, as a relational whole of the self, others and the environment. Descriptions of aesthetic experiences were analyzed leading to dimensions of environing described as “calm and privacy,” “community and togetherness” and “feelings and senses.” A favorite place was by all students described as a very local and nearby place accessible in everyday life. The analysis generated understandings of feelings of “fulfillment” and different embodied experiences of what an encounter with an outdoor place or being outdoors could mean. Furthermore, how personal and diverse the meaning making place tends to be and how experience and habits contribute to the students' creation of microenvironments. Dimensions of environing become part of an embodied process. The analysis of the written stories calls for an alternative understanding of what OE can or should consist of. The findings encourage teachers and researchers to consider alternative understandings and practices of OE that highlight and educate students' overall embodied (individual) experiences and learning in OE and PE.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Environing as Embodied Experience
  • 24.
    MacGregor, Oskar
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Zapped!: Why Brain Stimulation Does Not Equal Performance Enhancement2022In: Is Neurodoping Different?, 2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    If a technology being used by elite athletes to gain a competitive edge marks some sort of coming of age for said technology, then I suppose electrical and magnetic brain stimulation has now, it would seem, finally come of age. Gone are the days of debilitating One-Flew-Over-The-Cuckoo's-Nest-style electroshock jolts, replaced by sleek and sexy marketing for low-current "cognitive enhancement" devices, promising everything from improved focus to - as revealed by a quick traipse through Google and Reddit - increased creativity and intelligence, as well as helping you both win competitions and quit smoking while you're at it! And with this development, an attendant fear of its misuse, for creating unfair advantages - not least among elite athletes, with their federations' obsessive focus on (certain specific forms of) fairness - to the point that the journal Neuroethics recently dedicated a special issue to this topic of "neurodoping". But, perhaps not too surprisingly, reality doesn't really live up to the hype. While various individual studies can be found to support the view that brain stimulation might enhance performance, this takes place against a broad backdrop of serious issues within empirical neuroscience and psychology more generally, relating to all manner of problems with sample sizes, methods, assumptions, etc., along with some plain old ignorance about how to properly deal with all of these. In this talk, I will therefore give the briefest of introductions as to why essentially all existing claims about the purportedly performance-enhancing effects of transcranial electric stimulation (TES) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are claiming far too much, far too soon. As far as we really know, based on what robust evidence actually exists today, "neurodoping" of this sort gives no more a competitive advantage than does rubbing your lucky rabbit's foot.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    An Emotional Journey: The Significance of Aesthetic Experience for Motor Learning2021In: Learning Movements: New Perspectives of Movement Education / [ed] Håkan Larsson, New York: Routledge, 2021, 1, p. 186-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter suggests and illustrates a methodological approach for understanding movement learning in order to explore and clarify the relation between how people learn and the environment in which they learn. Drawing on the work of John Dewey, the later works of Ludwig Wittgenstein and socio-cultural approaches, a practical epistemology analysis (PEA) with focus on aesthetic judgments is suggested as a way of developing a valuable approach for understanding learning in different social and cultural contexts. The approach is illustrated by an exploration of movement learning in educational settings such as skating as a child, playing exergames in school, playing international elite football, or running marathon as an aging man. As can be seen from these illustrations, the significance of aesthetic experience for learning is visible in the narratives. The fact that aesthetic judgments are used normatively to decide what is to be included and excluded in movement learning, and also that aesthetic judgements are used to make relation between the individual and his/her life as a whole, facilitates an understanding of the relation between the learner and the life situation in which learning is situated.

  • 26.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University.
    Exploring gender habits: A practical epistemology analysis of exergaming in school2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1176-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitisation is an ongoing process in society as well as in physical education (PE) and research has identified digital technologies as a trend that influences the PE curriculum. A number of studies have explored the topic from different angles, although very few have empirically looked at the critical aspects of digitised PE in educational practice. This is particularly striking when it comes to issues of gender. Against this background, the aim of the paper is to explore gender habits in a digitised PE practice. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of the pragmatist feminist Shannon Sullivan, is used in the study. The data consists of video- and audio recordings of ongoing video gaming organised by the PE teacher. A practical epistemology analysis (PEA) is employed to explore the teenagers’ gender habits in depth. In the analysis, it is clear that the use of exergames in school reinforces traditional gender habits, rather than weakens them. This is particularly evident when the teenagers play in single sex groups. This is also the case when playing in mixed gender groups, although here some changes in gender habits can be identified. However, gender habits are not easily transformed and the findings support the argument that deliberate teaching is important when issues of gender are raised in practice.

  • 27.
    Mårtensson, Therése
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hälsa och livsstil: En kvalitativ studie inom skolämnet idrott och hälsa2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Worry, anxiety, depression and insomnia has doubled or increased even more the past 20 years among adolescents aged 15-24. Evidence suggests that the school system is not functioning optimally, which may have a negative impact on young people's health. In recent decades, health perspective has come to influence schools physical education, which resulted in a change of the name to physical training and health. This indicates a clearer focus on health. Aim: This study looked at how teachers in physical education are working to give young people knowledge about health. Focus has been on "Health and Lifestyle", a salutogenic approach to health has been used with the theory of SOC. Method: A qualitative approach with semi-structured interviews were used. Results: The teachers of physical education that were interviewed were of the view that health and lifestyle is important but they don’t have enough time or resources for it. Conclusion: This study has provided answers to the question that there are opportunities to work with health issues from a salutogenic perspective in school, provided that sets of values, participation, cooperation and resources for physical education are in place. Further studies are needed to verify these findings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Hälsa och Livsstil
  • 28.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mindfulness Therapies and Assessment Scales: A Brief Review2016In: International Journal of Psychological Studies, ISSN 1918-7211, E-ISSN 1918-722X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Oudhuis, Margareta
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Vinnande ledarskap: Att organisera för topprestation inom idrottsklubbar2019Book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Costa, Pablo B.
    Human Performance Laboratory, Center for Sport Performance, Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Fullerton, CA, USA.
    Effects of Training with an Agility Ladder on Sprint, Agility, and Dribbling Performance in Youth Soccer Players2020In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of coordination training using an agility ladder compared with a control group on physical fitness and technical performance in youth soccer players. Eighteen male youth soccer players (age: 12.2 ± 0.4 years; body height: 158.3 ± 10.8 cm; body mass: 45.0 ± 8.0 kg) were randomly assigned to an agility ladder group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 8). The intervention program was carried out three times a week over six weeks. Before and after the training period, the 10 m sprint, 20 m sprint, dribbling speed test, agility test, and slalom dribbling test performances were assessed. Within-group analysis showed significant improvements (p < 0.005) in 10 m and 20 m sprint performance from the pre- to the post-test for the agility ladder group (-2.39% and -2.10%) and the control group (-2.54% and -1.44%). No significant differences (p > 0.005) were found from the pre- to the post-test in the dribbling speed test, agility test, slalom dribbling test, and skill index. In the between-group analysis, there were no differences between the agility ladder group and the control group in any variable. In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest coordination training with an agility ladder does not seem to be effective to improve physical fitness and dribbling. Therefore, this information could be beneficial to players and coaches for programming tasks during soccer training sessions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Spain.
    Test–Retest Reliability of Skill Tests in the F-MARC Battery for Youth Soccer Players2019In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, ISSN 0031-5125, E-ISSN 1558-688X, Vol. 126, no 5, p. 1006-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to evaluate the test–retest reliability of soccer skill tests belonging to the F-MARC test battery. To avoid bias during talent identification and development, coaches and scouts should be using reliable tests for assessing soccer-specific skills in young male players. Fifty-two U-14 outfield male soccer players performed F-MARC soccer skill tests on two occasions, separated by 7 days. After familiarization, we administered two trial sessions of five skill tests: speed dribbling, juggling, shooting, passing, and heading. We assessed absolute reliability by expressing the standard error of measurement as a coefficient of variation with 95% limits of agreement, and we assessed relative reliability with the intraclass correlation coefficient and with Pearson’s correlation (r). The results demonstrated satisfactory relative and absolute reliability for speed dribbling, right foot juggling, short passing, shooting a dead ball right, shooting from a pass, heading in front, and heading right. However, reliability values for left foot juggling, chest-head-foot juggling, head-left-foot-right foot-chest-head juggling, long pass, and shooting a dead ball left tests were not strong enough to suggest their usage by coaches in training or sport scientists in research.

  • 32.
    Penedo-Jamardo, Erik
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Padrón-Cabo, Alexis
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sports Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    The impact of different recovery times between matches on physical and technical performance according to playing positions2017In: International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, ISSN 2474-8668, E-ISSN 1474-8185, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 271-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores the influence of playing with different recovery times between matches on physical activity and technical performance. The sample was composed by 4496 professional players who participated in German professional league (Deutsche Fußball Liga – DFL) during the season 2011–2012. Data were collected using a semi-automatic optical tracking system (VISTRACK, by Impire Corp., Germany). Differences on work rate profiles of soccer players were analysed for the following variables: total distance covered, number of fast runs, number of sprints and percentage of successful passes. The main finding of this study suggests that the total distance covered, the number of fast runs and the number of sprints decreased in professional soccer players in microcycles with length of <4 days during the mid-season. Central defenders, external defenders and external midfielders covered less total distance in microcycles of <4 days, and this effect was more evident during the mid-season. During three-day microcycles in comparison to four-day cycles, central defenders and external defenders reduced the total distance covered. No differences were observed between teams according to the team quality and match location. Coaches should pay extra attention to adapt recovery strategy according to playing position and period of season.

  • 33.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Gómez, Miguel-Ángel
    Polytechnic University of Madrid.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Reliability of Teams’ Game-Related Statistics in Basketball: Number of Games Required and Minimal Detectable Change2019In: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, ISSN 0270-1367, E-ISSN 2168-3824, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 297-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In basketball, game-related statistics are the most common measure of performance. However, the literature assessing their reliability is scarce. Purpose: Analyze the number of games required to obtain a good relative and absolute reliability of teams’ game-related statistics.

    Method: A total of 884 games from the 2015–2016 to 2017–2018 seasons of the Spanish men’s professional league were analyzed using all games and clustered by scoring difference. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for each variable. The number of games required to detect a change and to achieve good relative reliability was calculated using minimal detectable change and Spearman-Brown prophecy formula respectively.

    Results: Using all games, the results showed that the minimal number of games required in each group was 30 to detect a medium change (d > .5), 187 for a small change (d > .2), and 100 for good relative reliability (ICC ≥ .75). Using balanced and unbalanced games, the minimal number of games required in each group was respectively 31 and 30 to detect a medium change (d > .5), 190 and 188 for a small change (d > .2), and 191 and 121 for good relative reliability (ICC ≥ .75).

    Conclusions: The sample needs to consist of at least 30 games in each group to detect a medium size change, and at least 190 games to detect a small size change. To be able to rank teams with good reliability, at least 100 games are required when including both balanced and unbalanced games.

  • 34.
    Pérez-Ferreirós, Alexandra
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Short- and mid-term effects of the 2010 rule changes on game-related statistics in European basketball championships: An interrupted time series analysis2018In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1081-1089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2010, one of the major rule changes in basketball came into effect. Including an extension of the 3-point line from 6.25 m to 6.75 m, changed shape of the 3-s area, the addition of no-charge semicircles, and modifications of the shot-clock. This study aimed to analyse if the rule modifications influenced the game-related statistics, both short- and mid-term using interrupted time series analysis, and if the rule changes had the same influence on different age groups and genders. The sample was composed by 5296 games from the European championships 2005–2016 for men and women in both senior and youth competitions. The standard game-related statistics were analysed. The game pace has increased or ceased to decrease after the rule modifications. The development towards a higher proportion of field goals being 3-pointers has continued, although the proportion was lowered directly after the rule modifications. The women senior seems to be the category where the rule modifications had the most effect on the continuous development. No general pattern of differences in effects between categories was found.

  • 35.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Lorenzo-Martínez, Miguel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    López-Del Campo, Roberto
    Department of Competitions and Mediacoach, LaLiga, Madrid, Spain.
    Nevado-Garrosa, Fabio
    Department of Competitions and Mediacoach, LaLiga, Madrid, Spain.
    Lago-Peñas, Carlos
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Elite Soccer Players do Not Cover Less Distance in the Second Half of the Matches When Game Interruptions Are Considered2020In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This study aimed to analyze quantitative differences in the physical demands of male elite soccer players between the first and second halves during official matches, accounting for effective playing time (the duration of play after subtracting the game interruptions) and playing positions. A total of 4,249 individual match observations of 412 outfield players competing in the Spanish first division league (LaLiga) were undertaken during the 2018–2019 season, using a computerized tracking system (TRACAB, Chyronhego, New York, NY). The players were classified into 5 positional roles: central defenders (CD), external defenders (ED), central midfielders (CM), external midfielders (EM), and forwards (F). The main results showed that in contrast to those observed when total playing time was considered, independent of playing position, there were no significant differences on high-speed running (HSR) (5.5 ± 2.4 vs. 5.5 ± 2.4 m·min−1) and sprint (5.3 ± 3.3 vs. 5.4 ± 3.3 m·min−1) distances between the first and second halves in professional soccer players when the effective playing time was considered. However, differences in match running performance at HSR and sprint distances between the first and second halves were dependent on players' playing position. Whereas ED and EM maintained HSR and sprint efforts during the second half, CD and CM significantly increased (p < 0.001) the distance covered at sprint during the second period of the match. Contrarily, F were unable to maintain their HSR (6.2 ± 2.3 vs. 5.9 ± 3.3 m·min−1) and sprint (7.0 ± 3.5 vs. 6.5 ± 3.4 m·min−1) match running performances during the second half. Such findings demonstrate that total playing time could overestimate fatigue-induced performance declines. Thus, effective playing time and playing position should be taken into account when interpreting the match running performance of professional soccer players.

  • 36.
    Riveiro, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Dahlbom, Anders
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    König, Rikard
    Department of Information Technology, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ulf
    Department of Information Technology, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Brattberg, Peter
    Department of Information Technology, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden / PGA Sweden, Bara, Sweden.
    Supporting Golf Coaching and Swing Instruction with Computer-Based Training Systems2015In: Learning and Collaboration Technologies: Second International Conference, LCT 2015, Held as Part of HCI International 2015, Los Angeles, CA, USA, August 2-7, 2015, Proceedings / [ed] Panayiotis Zaphiris; Andri Ioannou, Springer International Publishing Switzerland , 2015, Vol. 9192, p. 279-290Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Golf is a popular sport around the world. Since an accomplished golf swing is essential for succeeding in this sport, golf players spend a considerable amount of time perfecting their swing. In order to guide the design of future computer-based training systems that support swing instruction, this paper analyzes the data gathered during interviews with golf instructors and participant observations of actual swing coaching sessions. Based on our field work, we describe the characteristics of a proficient swing, how the instructional sessions are normally carried out and the challenges professional instructors face. Taking into account these challenges, we outline which desirable capabilities future computer-based training systems for professional golf instructors should have.

  • 37.
    Rydh, Mathias
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Using the Brain to Help Rehabilitate the Body: Factors which can Affect Injury Rehabilitation Outcome2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity can be beneficial to both physical and mental health, but can also lead to injuries. While injury rehabilitation through physical therapy is mostly focused on physical exercise, there are also other factors, which may influence rehabilitation outcome. The factorsreviewed are: rehabilitation adherence, mindfulness meditation, mental imagery, action observation, self-talk, goal-setting and social support. This essay investigates the neural correlates of these factors, as well as how they can affect rehabilitation outcome and wellbeing, to a lesser degree, during rehabilitation. Among the effects found are performance enhancement, increased self-efficacy, increased pain tolerance, increased motivation and reduced strength loss. Suggestions for future research is also provided.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Sal de Rellán‐Guerra, Alejandro
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Rey, Ezequiel
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Kalén, Anton
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences University of Vigo Pontevedra Spain.
    Lago‐Peñas, Carlos
    Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Age‐related physical and technical match performance changes in elite soccer players2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1421-1427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The age of peak performance is likely to vary between sports and competitions, affected by the specific skills and attributes needed to succeed in the particular competition. However, no studies using modern tracking techniques have examined the effects of age on competitive match play performance. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of age on match physical and technical performance using a large-scale analysis of match performance in professional soccer players. A total of 14 546 individual match observations were undertaken in the first German league (Bundesliga) during the 2012-2013, 2013-2014, and 2014-2015 seasons using a computerized tracking system (VISTRACK, by Impire Corp.). Differences in physical and technical match performance of soccer players were analyzed for the following variables: total distance covered, number of fast runs, number of sprints, and percentage of successful passes. Professional soccer players aged >30 years showed a significant lower performance in the total distance covered, the number of fast runs, and the number of sprints compared with younger players (≤30 years). Conversely, the player's ability to make successful passes increased with age. These effects were observed in all positional roles except wide midfielders. These findings may help coaches and managers to better understand the effects of age on match-related physical and technical performance and may have the potential to assist in decisions such as, when a new contract would be signed, the duration of the contract, the salary, or when to replace or transfer a player depending on their age.

  • 39.
    Sprengeler, Ole
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiological Methods and Etiological Research, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Department of Biometry and Data Management, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Bammann, Karin
    Department of Biometry and Data Management, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany ; Working group Epidemiology of Demographic Change, Institute for Public Health and Nursing Sciences (IPP), University of Bremen, Germany.
    Buck, Christoph
    Department of Biometry and Data Management, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Lauria, Fabio
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council of Italy, Avellino, Italy.
    Verbestel, Vera
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Konstabel, Kenn
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia ; School of Natural Sciences and Health, Tallinn University, Estonia ; Institute of Psychology, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, Zaragoza, Spain ; Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain ; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain ; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Madrid, Spain.
    Pitsiladis, Yannis
    Collaborating Centre of Sports Medicine, University of Brighton, Welkin House, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.
    Page, Angie
    Centre for Exercise,Nutrition and Health Sciences, School of Policy Studies, University of Bristol, United Kingdom ; NIHR Bristol Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust and University of Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Department of Epidemiological Methods and Etiological Research, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany ; Institute of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University Bremen, Germany.
    Trajectories of objectively measured physical activity and childhood overweight: longitudinal analysis of the IDEFICS/I.Family cohort2021In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since only few longitudinal studies with appropriate study designs investigated the relationship between objectively measured physical activity (PA) and overweight, the degree PA can prevent excess weight gain in children, remains unclear. Moreover, evidence is limited on how childhood overweight determines PA during childhood. Therefore, we analyzed longitudinal trajectories of objectively measured PA and their bi-directional association with weight trajectories of children at 2- and 6-year follow-ups. Methods: Longitudinal data of three subsequent measurements from the IDEFICS/I.Family cohort study were used to analyze the bi-directional association between moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and weight status by means of multilevel regression models. Analyses comprised 3393 (2-year follow-up) and 1899 (6-year follow-up) children aged 2–15.9 years from eight European countries with valid accelerometer data and body mass index (BMI) measurements. For categorized analyses, children’s weight status was categorized as normal weight or overweight (cutoff: 90th percentile of BMI) and children’s PA as (in-) sufficiently active (cutoffs: 30, 45 and 60 min of MVPA per day). Results: Children engaging in at least 60 min MVPA daily at baseline and follow-ups had a lower odds of becoming overweight (odds ratio [OR] at 2-year follow-up: 0.546, 95% CI: 0.378, 0.789 and 6-year follow-up: 0.393, 95% CI: 0.242, 0.638), compared to less active children. Similar associations were found for 45 min MVPA daily. On the other side, children who became overweight had the lowest odds to achieve 45 or 60 min MVPA daily (ORs: 0.459 to 0.634), compared to normal weight children. Conclusions: Bi-directional associations between MVPA and weight status were observed. In summary, at least 60 min MVPA are still recommended for the prevention of childhood overweight. To prevent excess weight gain, 45 min MVPA per day also showed preventive effects. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Supej, Matej
    et al.
    Faculty of Sport, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Kalén, Anton
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment. Swedish Olympic Committee, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Verdel, Nina
    Faculty of Sport, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Ogrin, Jan
    Faculty of Sport, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Holmberg, Hans-Christer
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden ; School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    The Contribution of Ski Poles to Aerodynamic Drag in Alpine Skiing2023In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 13, no 14, article id 8152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was designed to determine the contribution of the cross-sectional area of the ski poles (Sp) to the total aerodynamic drag during alpine skiing. At three different wind speeds in a wind tunnel, 10 skiers assumed typical alpine skiing postures (high, middle, and tuck), and their frontal aerodynamic drag was assessed with a force plate and their cross-sectional area, along with that of their ski poles, determined by interactive image segmentation. The data collected were utilized to examine intra-subject variation in Sp, the effects of Sp on the coefficient of aerodynamic drag (Cd), and the product of Cd and total cross-sectional area (Cd∙S. The major findings were as follows: (i) Sp ranged from 0.0067 (tuck position) to 0.0262 m2 (middle position), contributing 2.2–4.8% of the total cross-sectional area, respectively; (ii) Sp was dependent on wind speed in the high and middle positions; (iii) intra-subject variations ranged from 0.0018 m2 (27.6%) in the tuck position to 0.0072 m2 (30.5%) in the high position; (iv) Sp exerted a likely effect on Cd and Cd∙S. The extensive intra- and inter-skier variability in Sp can account for as much as ~5% of the total frontal cross-sectional area and future investigations on how elite skiers optimize their positioning of the poles in a manner that reduces aerodynamic drag are warranted. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Timpka, Toomas
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Bickenbach, Jerome
    Department of Philosophy, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
    Finch, Caroline F.
    Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Federation University Australia, Ballarat, VIC, Australia.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Nordenfelt, Lennart
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    What is a Sports Injury?2014In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 423-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current sports injury reporting systems lack a common conceptual basis. We propose a conceptual foundation as a basis for the recording of health problems associated with participation in sports, based on the notion of impairment used by the World Health Organization. We provide definitions of sports impairment concepts to represent the perspectives of health services, the participants in sports and physical exercise themselves, and sports institutions. For each perspective, the duration of the causative event is used as the norm for separating concepts into those denoting impairment conditions sustained instantly and those developing gradually over time. Regarding sports impairment sustained in isolated events, sports injury denotes the loss of bodily function or structure that is the object of observations in clinical examinations; sports trauma is defined as an immediate sensation of pain, discomfort or loss of functioning that is the object of athlete self-evaluations; and sports incapacity is the sidelining of an athlete because of a health evaluation made by a legitimate sports authority that is the object of time loss observations. Correspondingly, sports impairment caused by excessive bouts of physical exercise is denoted as sports disease (overuse syndrome) when observed by health service professionals during clinical examinations, sports illness when observed by the athlete in self-evaluations, and sports sickness when recorded as time loss from sports participation by a sports body representative. We propose a concerted development effort in this area that takes advantage of concurrent ontology management resources and involves the international sporting community in building terminology systems that have broad relevance.

  • 42.
    Åkerlund, Emma
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences.
    Racke, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences.
    Fysisk aktivitet och skolprestation: Kvantitativ systematisk litteraturstudie2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The daily physical activity of children decreases, new activities and interests performed in front of a computer are a contributing factor to this. Increased sedentary lifestyle can lead to a few consequences. Physical activity can counteract this and contribute to improved fitness, muscle strength, blood pressure, blood fats, bone density and BMI in children and adolescent of school age.

    Aim: To compile how physical activity during the school day for students (age 6-19) affects school performance.

    Method: This systematic literature study is based on 13 scientific articles. The studies have a quantitative approach and were conducted with randomized control studies (RCT). A quality review of the material was done with the help of GRADE.

    Result: The result does not show a unanimous result regarding how physical activity affects students' school performance. Instead, the studies show three main areas that are summarized as a positive result on school performance after intervention, no change in school performance after intervention and finally other effects of intervention.

    Conclusion: No general conclusion has been drawn regarding increased physical activity and students' school performance. Only a small part may have been negatively affected by the increased physical activity during the school day. In general, no negative impact can be seen on students' school performance after the interventions. Research also shows that students who have taken part in these interventions develop fewer problems with anxiety, compared with children in a control group.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf