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  • 1.
    Arnoldussen, Ilse A. C.
    et al.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, The Netherlands / Radboud Alzheimer Center, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurology, The State University of New York Downstate Health Sciences University, Brooklyn, USA.
    Leijsen, Esther M. C.
    Department of Neurology, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    de Leeuw, Frank-Erik
    Department of Neurology, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Kiliaan, Amanda J.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, The Netherlands / Radboud Alzheimer Center, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Adiposity is related to cerebrovascular and brain volumetry outcomes in the RUN DMC study2019In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 93, no 9, p. e864-e878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Adiposity predictors, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and blood leptin and total adiponectin levels were associated with components of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and brain volumetry in 503 adults with CSVD who were ≥50 years of age and enrolled in the Radboud University Nijmegen Diffusion Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Cohort (RUN DMC).

    METHODS: RUN DMC participants were followed up for 9 years (2006-2015). BMI, WC, brain imaging, and dementia diagnoses were evaluated at baseline and follow-up. Adipokines were measured at baseline. Brain imaging outcomes included CSVD components, white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, microbleeds, gray and white matter, hippocampal, total brain, and intracranial volumes.

    RESULTS: Cross-sectionally among men at baseline, higher BMI, WC, and leptin were associated with lower gray matter and total brain volumes, and higher BMI and WC were associated with lower hippocampal volume. At follow-up 9 years later, higher BMI was cross-sectionally associated with lower gray matter volume, and an obese WC (>102 cm) was protective for ≥1 lacune or ≥1 microbleed in men. In women, increasing BMI and overweight or obesity (BMI ≥25 kg/m2 or WC >88 cm) were associated with ≥1 lacune. Longitudinally, over 9 years, a baseline obese WC was associated with decreasing hippocampal volume, particularly in men, and increasing white matter hyperintensity volume in women and men.

    CONCLUSIONS: Anthropometric and metabolic adiposity predictors were differentially associated with CSVD components and brain volumetry outcomes by sex. Higher adiposity is associated with a vascular-neurodegenerative spectrum among adults at risk for vascular forms of cognitive impairment and dementias.

  • 2.
    Bixby, Honor
    et al.
    Imperial College London, United Kingdom.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ezzati, Majid
    Imperial College London, United Kingdom.
    Rising rural body-mass index is the main driver of the global obesity epidemic in adults2019In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 569, no 7755, p. 260-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body-mass index (BMI) has increased steadily in most countries in parallel with a rise in the proportion of the population who live in cities1,2. This has led to a widely reported view that urbanization is one of the most important drivers of the global rise in obesity3-6. Here we use 2,009 population-based studies, with measurements of height and weight in more than 112 million adults, to report national, regional and global trends in mean BMI segregated by place of residence (a rural or urban area) from 1985 to 2017. We show that, contrary to the dominant paradigm, more than 55% of the global rise in mean BMI from 1985 to 2017-and more than 80% in some low- and middle-income regions-was due to increases in BMI in rural areas. This large contribution stems from the fact that, with the exception of women in sub-Saharan Africa, BMI is increasing at the same rate or faster in rural areas than in cities in low- and middle-income regions. These trends have in turn resulted in a closing-and in some countries reversal-of the gap in BMI between urban and rural areas in low- and middle-income countries, especially for women. In high-income and industrialized countries, we noted a persistently higher rural BMI, especially for women. There is an urgent need for an integrated approach to rural nutrition that enhances financial and physical access to healthy foods, to avoid replacing the rural undernutrition disadvantage in poor countries with a more general malnutrition disadvantage that entails excessive consumption of low-quality calories.

  • 3.
    El Ansari, Walid
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar / Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Gloucestershire, Gloucester, United Kingdom.
    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele
    Unit for Health Promotion Research, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Association of health status and health behaviors with weight satisfaction vs. Body image concern: Analysis of 5888 undergraduates in Egypt, Palestine, and Finland2019In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 12, article id 2860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the relationships between weight satisfaction, body image concern, healthy nutrition, health awareness, and physical activity among college students across culturally different countries. We assessed country and sex-specific associations between health status (self-rated health, depression, BMI), healthy behavior (healthy nutrition, physical activity, health awareness), weight satisfaction, and body image concern via a cross-sectional survey (5888 undergraduates) in Egypt, Palestine, and Finland. This health and wellbeing survey employed identical self-administered paper questionnaires administered at several Universities in two Eastern Mediterranean countries (Egypt, Palestine—Gaza Strip), and an online-survey comprising the same questions in Finland. Regression analyses were employed. Health status variables exhibited the strongest associations; high BMI and more depressive symptoms were more often among students satisfied with their weight (except in Palestine), but they were positively associated with body image concern irrespective of country or gender. Self-rated health was not associated with body image concern or weight satisfaction. Healthy behaviors were not associated with body image concern or weight satisfaction. Depressive symptoms and BMI were the most prominent predictors for body image concern. There were country-specific consistent results when using the body image concern score. Further research is necessary to compare body image across different cultures and countries. 

  • 4.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, New York, USA.
    Adipose Tissue Complexities in Dyslipidemias2019In: Dyslipidemia / [ed] Samy I. McFarlane, London: IntechOpen , 2019, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adipose tissue is the largest organ in the human body and, in excess, contributes to dyslipidemias and the dysregulation of other vascular and metabolic processes. Adipose tissue is heterogeneous, comprised of several cell types based on morphology, cellular age, and endocrine and paracrine function. Adipose tissue depots are also regional, primarily due to sex differences and genetic variation. Adipose tissue is also characterized as subcutaneous vs. visceral. In addition, fatty deposits exist outside of adipose tissue, such as those surrounding the heart, or as infiltration of skeletal muscle. This review focuses on adipose tissue and its contribution to dyslipidemias. Dyslipidemias are defined as circulating blood lipid levels that are too high or altered. Lipids include both traditional and nontraditional species. Leaving aside traditional definitions, adipose tissue contributes to dyslipidemias in a myriad of ways. To address a small portion of this topic, we reviewed (a) adipose tissue location and cell types, (b) body composition, (c) endocrine adipose, (d) the fat-brain axis, and (e) genetic susceptibility. The influence of these complex aspects of adipose tissue on dyslipidemias and human health, illustrating that, once again, that adipose tissue is a quintessential, multifunctional tissue of the human body, will be summarized.

  • 5.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, New York, USA.
    Epidemiology Informs Randomized Clinical Trials of Cognitive Impairments and Late-Onset, Sporadic Dementias2018In: Journal of Neurology & Neuromedicine, ISSN 2572-942X, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 13-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    McFarlane, S. I.
    Obesity, cardiovascular disease risk and frailty in aging women with HIV infectionIn: Geriatrics, ISSN 2308-3417Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    et al.
    Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Nutritional Sciences and Environmental Management, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen, Germany / Department of Management, Society, and Communication, CBS Sustainability, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Reisch, Lucia A.
    Department of Management, Society, and Communication, CBS Sustainability, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Hunsberger, Monica L.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Arvid Wallgrens Backe, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, H-7622 Pécs, Hungary.
    Luszczki, Edyta
    Medical Faculty, University of Rzeszów, Rzeszów, Poland.
    Mazur, Artur
    Medical Faculty, University of Rzeszów, ul.Warszawska 26 a, Rzeszów, Poland.
    Mendl, E.
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, H-7622 Pécs, Hungary.
    Saamel, M.
    Department of Surveillance and Evaluation, National Institute for Health Development,Tallinn, Estonia.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    The effect of smileys as motivational incentives on children's fruit and vegetable choice, consumption and waste: A field experiment in schools in five European countries2020In: Food Policy, ISSN 0306-9192, E-ISSN 1873-5657, article id 101852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess whether smiley stamps work as a motivational incentive to promote fruit and vegetable eating among children, we conducted a field experiment in ten primary schools in five European countries using one control and one treatment school per country. The six-week experiment was split into three two-week phases before, during and after the smiley was implemented. During the smiley phase, the children received a smiley stamp for choosing a portion of fruits or vegetables. We find an increase attributed to the smiley stamp on children's fruit and vegetable choice and consumption, but also waste. Comparing the effects across countries, we observe significant variations in the smiley effect. This study thus demonstrates, in general, that a low-cost, easy-to-implement incentive such as a smiley stamp has the potential to motivate school children to increase their fruit and vegetable consumption; the study simultaneously underscores the high relevance of context for the effects of incentives. 

  • 8.
    Iglesia, Iris
    et al.
    Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), 50013, Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón); 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Red de Salud Materno-infantil y del Desarrollo (SAMID), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Intemann, Timm
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, 28359 Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Bremen University, 28359 Bremen, Germany.
    De Miguel-Etayo, Pilar
    Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), 50013, Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón); 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Department of Preventive & Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, 20133 Milan, Italy.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, 28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, 28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Russo, Paola
    Epidemology & Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, 83100 Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, 11619 Tallinn, Estonia.
    Papoutsou, Stalo
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, 2018 Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Nagy, Peter
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pécs, 7622 Pécs, Hungary.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rise, Patrizia
    Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), 50013, Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón); 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain.
    Dairy consumption at snack meal occasions and the overall quality of diet during childhood: Prospective and cross-sectional analyses from the idefics/i.family cohort2020In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is scarce information on the influence of dairy consumption between main meals on the overall diet quality through childhood, constituting the main aim of this research. From the Identification and prevention of Dietary-and lifestyle induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS) study, and based on the data availability in each period due to drop outs, 8807 children aged 2 to 9.9 years from eight European countries at baseline (T0: 2007–2008); 5085 children after two years (T1); and 1991 after four years (T3), were included in these analyses. Dietary intake and the Diet Quality Index (DQI) were assessed by two 24 hours dietary recalls (24-HDR) and food frequency questionnaire. Consumption of milk and yogurt (p = 0.04) and cheese (p < 0.001) at snack meal occasions was associated with higher DQI scores in T0; milk and yogurt (p < 0.001), and cheese (p < 0.001) in T1; and cheese (p = 0.05) in T3. Consumers of milk (p = 0.02), yogurt (p < 0.001), or cheese (p < 0.001) throughout T0 and T1 at all snack moments had significantly higher scores of DQI compared to non-consumers. This was also observed with the consumption of cheese between T1 and T3 (p = 0.03). Consumption of dairy products at snack moments through childhood is associated with a better overall diet quality, being a good strategy to improve it in this period. 

  • 9.
    Intemann, Timm
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Bremen University, Germany.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Bremen University, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Dereń, Katarzyna
    Institute of Nursing and Health Sciences, Medical Faculty, University of Rzeszow, Poland.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A
    Universidad de Zaragoza, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Aragón (IIS Aragón) and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Nutrición y la Obesidad (CIBEROBN), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Sirangelo, Ivana
    University of Campania "L. Vanvitelli", Naples, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Pala, Valeria
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Urinary sucrose and fructose to validate self-reported sugar intake in children and adolescents: results from the I.Family study2019In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 1247-1258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Excessive consumption of free sugar increases the risk for non-communicable diseases where a proper assessment of this intake is necessary to correctly estimate its association with certain diseases. Urinary sugars have been suggested as objective biomarkers for total and free sugar intake in adults but less is known about this marker in children and adolescents. Therefore, the aim of this exploratory study is to evaluate the relative validity of self-reported intake using urinary sugars in children and adolescents.

    METHODS: The study was conducted in a convenience subsample of 228 participants aged 5-18 years of the I.Family study that investigates the determinants of food choices, lifestyle and health in European families. Total, free and intrinsic sugar intake (g/day) and sugar density (g/1000 kcal) were assessed using 24-h dietary recalls (24HDRs). Urinary sucrose (USUC) and urinary fructose (UFRU) were measured in morning urine samples and corrected for creatinine excretion (USUC/Cr, UFRU/Cr). Correlation coefficients, the method of triads and linear regression models were used to investigate the relationship between intake of different types of sugar and urinary sugars.

    RESULTS: The correlation between usual sugar density calculated from multiple 24HDRs and the sum of USUC/Cr and UFRU/Cr (USUC/Cr + UFRU/Cr) was 0.38 (p < 0.001). The method of triads revealed validity coefficients for the 24HDR from 0.64 to 0.87. Linear regression models showed statistically significant positive associations between USUC/Cr + UFRU/Cr and the intake of total and free sugar.

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the relative validity of total and free sugar intake assessed by self-reported 24HDRs in children and adolescents.

  • 10.
    Jilani, Hannah
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Germany / Institute for Public Health and Nursing Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hunsberger, Monica
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Department of Research, Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Italy.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Italy.
    Solea, Antonia
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Estonia.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Germany.
    Relative Validity of a Food and Beverage Preference Questionnaire to Characterize Taste Phenotypes in Children Adolescents and Adults2019In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess the relative validity of our food and beverage preference questionnaire we investigated the association between sweet and fatty taste preference scores (assessed using a food and beverage preference questionnaire) and sweet and fatty food propensity scores (derived from a food frequency questionnaire). In I.Family, a large European multi-country cohort study, 12,207 participants from Cyprus, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Spain and Sweden, including 5291 adults, 3082 adolescents, and 3834 children, completed a food and beverage preference questionnaire with 63 items. Cumulative preference scores for sweet and fatty taste were calculated from the single item ranking ranging from 1 to 5. The relative consumption frequency of foods classified as sweet and fatty was used to calculate the corresponding consumption propensities, a continuous variable ranging from 0 to 100. We conducted regression analyses to investigate the association between sweet and fatty taste preference scores and sweet and fatty food propensity scores, respectively, separately for adults, adolescents >= 12 years, and for children <12 years. The overall sweet taste preference score was positively associated with the sweet food consumption propensity score (beta = 2.4, 95% CI: 2.1;2.7) and the fatty taste preference score was positively associated with the fatty food consumption propensity score (beta = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.8;2.2). After stratification for age (children <12 years, adolescents >= 12 years, and adults), the effect remained significant in all age groups and was strongest in adolescents and adults. We conclude that our food and beverage preference questionnaire is a useful instrument for epidemiological studies on sensory perception and health outcomes and for the characterization of sensory taste phenotypes.

  • 11.
    Kampe, Karina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Kostens hälsomässiga effekter hos kvinnor i fertil ålder: En litteraturöversikt2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    General diet and health guidelines have historically been designed based on research on men, with the result that women of childbearing age have often been misunderstood, misinterpreted and mistreated. Low-grade inflammation, fast food and modern lifestyle, is thought to be the basis of several diseases predominantly afflicted by women. The purpose of the study was a survey and critical review of health and ill health research in women of childbearing age related to dietary choices.

    Method

    The study is a literature review of ten articles focusing on health and ill health of women at child bearing age in relation to diet. The articles have been systematically analyzed and summarized.

    Results

    The results showed that women's fertility, the onset of menopause, premenstrual disorders and diseases appear to be related to physical imbalances and inflammation and were affected by dietary choices. Yellow and green vegetables and fruits, fiber, vegetable protein and an antiinflammatory diet displayed extra beneficial health effects.

    Discussion

    The importance of diet for fertility and health in women of childbearing age was clear and the combined effects of nutrients in diet appear to exceed individual supplements. Knowledge dissemination as well as research is essential for strengthening the group's health, promoting empowerment as well as make room for good bio-psycho-social effects.

  • 12.
    Kylberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Nutritional services and assessment2014In: Encyclopedia of Human Services and Diversity / [ed] Linwood H. Cousins, Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2014, p. 975-977Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Murtas, Rossella
    et al.
    Fdn IRCSS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy / Univ Cagliari, Dept Math & Comp Sci, Cagliari, Italy.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Fdn IRCSS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Intemann, Timm
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Bremen Univ, Inst Stat, Bremen, Germany.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Med Sch, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Siani, Alfonso
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Res, Avellino, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Mazur, Artur
    Univ Rzeszow, Med Fac, Inst Nursing & Hlth Sci, Rzeszow, Poland.
    Deren, Katarzyna
    Univ Rzeszow, Med Fac, Inst Nursing & Hlth Sci, Rzeszow, Poland.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Bremen Univ, Inst Stat, Bremen, Germany / Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCSS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Does Providing Assistance to Children and Adolescents Increase Repeatability and Plausibility of Self-Reporting Using a Web-Based Dietary Recall Instrument?2018In: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, ISSN 2212-2672, E-ISSN 2212-2680, Vol. 118, no 12, p. 2324-2330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background It is important to find ways to minimize errors when children self-report food consumption. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate whether assistance given to children completing a self-administered 24-hour dietary recall instrument called SACANA (Self-Administered Child, Adolescent and Adult Nutrition Assessment) increased the repeatability and plausibility of energy intake (EI) estimates. Participants/setting The study was conducted between October 2013 and March 2016 in a convenience sample of 395 children, aged 8 to 17 years, from eight European countries participating in the I.Family study. Design SACANA was used to recall the previous day's food intake, twice in a day, once with and once without assistance. Main outcome measures The difference in EI between the first and second recalls was the main repeatability measure; the ratio of EI to basal metabolic rate was the plausibility measure. Statistical methods Generalized linear mixed models, adjusted for sex, age, and body mass index z-score, were used to assess whether assistance during the first vs second recall influenced repeatability and plausibility. Results The difference in estimated EI (EI from second recall minus EI from first recall) was significantly lower (P<0.001) in those assisted at first (median=-76 kcal) than those assisted at second recall (median=282 kcal). Modeling showed that EI at assisted first recall was 19% higher (95% CI 1.13 to 1.24) than in assisted second recall. Overall, 60% of recalls had a plausible EI. Modeling to estimate the simultaneous effects of second vs first recall and assistance vs no assistance on plausibility showed that those assisted at first recall had significantly higher odds of a plausible recall than those unassisted (odds ratio 3.64, 95% CI 2.20 to 6.01), with no significant difference in plausibility of second recall compared to the first (odds ratio 1.48, 95% CI 0.92 to 2.35). Conclusions When children are assisted at first recall, the plausibility and repeatability of the later unassisted recall improve. This improvement was evident for all ages. A future, adequately powered study is required to investigate the age range for which assistance is advisable.

  • 14.
    Russo, Marika D.
    et al.
    Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, University of Bremen, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Kourides, Yannis
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Cyprus.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    Russo, Paula
    Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    The impact of adding sugars to milk and fruit on adiposity and diet quality in children: A cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of the identification and prevention of dietary-and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants (IDEFICS) study2018In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 1350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sugar, particularly as free sugars or sugar-sweetened beverages, significantly contributes to total energy intake, and, possibly, to increased body weight. Excessive consumption may be considered as a proxy of poor diet quality. However, no previous studies evaluated the association between the habit of adding sugars to “healthy” foods, such as plain milk and fresh fruit, and indicators of adiposity and/or dietary quality in children. To answer to these research questions, we Panalysed the European cohort of children participating in the IDEFICS study. Anthropometric variables, frequency of consumption of sugars added to milk and fruit (SAMF), and scores of adherence to healthy dietary pattern (HDAS) were assessed at baseline in 9829 children stratified according to age and sex. From this cohort, 6929 children were investigated again after two years follow-up. At baseline, a direct association between SAMF categories and adiposity indexes was observed only in children aged 6–<10 years, while the lower frequency of SAMF consumption was significantly associated with a higher HDAS. At the two year follow-up, children with higher baseline SAMF consumption showed significantly higher increases in all the anthropometric variables measured, with the exception of girls 6–<10 years old. The inverse association between SAMF categories and HDAS was still present at the two years follow-up in all age and sex groups. Our results suggest that the habit to adding sugars to foods that are commonly perceived as healthy may impact the adherence to healthy dietary guidelines and increase in adiposity risk as well. 

  • 15.
    Santaliestra-Pasías, Alba M.
    et al.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Spain.
    González-Gil, Esther M.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Spain / Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, University of Granada, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Department of Research, Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Intemann, Timm
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Van Aart, Carola
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Rise, Patrizia
    Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    National Institute for Health Development, Estonian Centre of Behavioral and Health Sciences, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child health, REF, Cyprus.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Spain.
    Predictive associations between lifestyle behaviours and dairy consumption: The IDEFICS study2020In: NMCD. Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, ISSN 0939-4753, E-ISSN 1590-3729, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 514-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours (SB) are related to obesity and cardiometabolic risk; however, the literature is controversial regarding the effect of dairy consumption on the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The aim of this study was to assess longitudinally the relationship between specific lifestyle behaviours (PA and SB) and dairy consumption in a sample of European children and adolescents. Methods and results: Children from the IDEFICS study were included in the analyses. Two measurements, with 2 years' interval, were conducted. A total of 1688 (50.8% boys) children provided information regarding diet, measured by a 24-h dietary recall, PA measured by accelerometers and parent-reported sedentary screen time (SST) at both time points. Different combinations of these behaviours, at each survey and over time, were derived applying specific recommendations. Multilevel ordinal logistic regression and analysis of covariance were used to assess their association with dairy consumption, adjusted for potential confounders. Differences by gender were found regarding dairy product consumption and also adherence to SB and PA recommendations at T0 and T1. Children meeting both lifestyle recommendations, at the two measurement points, had higher probability to consume more milk and yogurt and less cheese than the rest of combinations. Conclusions: These results suggest that European children with a healthy lifestyle, especially regarding PA and SB over time, consumed more milk and yogurt. This study suggests that the protective effect of specific dairy products found in literature could be partially due to the association of their consumption with specific healthy lifestyles.

  • 16.
    Sina, Elida
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Buck, Christoph
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Jilani, Hannah
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute for Public Health and Nursing Research—IPP, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Lefcosia, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallin, Estonia.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Marild, Staffan
    Department. of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pala, Valeria
    Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Faculty of Mathematics/Computer Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Association of infant feeding patterns with taste preferences in European children and adolescents: A retrospective latent profile analysis2019In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 1-16, article id 1040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate associations between the duration of infant feeding practices (FP) and taste preferences (TP) in European children and adolescents. A total of 5526 children (6-16 years old) of the I.Family study completed a Food and Beverage Preference Questionnaire to measure their preferences for sweet, fatty and bitter tastes. Mothers retrospectively reported the FPs duration in months: exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), exclusive formula milk feeding (EFMF), combined breastfeeding (BF&FMF) and the age at the introduction of complementary foods (CF). Using logistic regression analyses and latent class analysis (latent profiles of FP and CF were identified), we explored associations between profiles and TP, adjusting for various covariates, including the Healthy Diet Adherence Score (HDAS). A total of 48% of children had short durations of EBF (≤4 months) and BF&FMF (≤6 months) and were introduced to CF early (<6 months). No significant relationship was observed between the single FPs and TP, even when considering common profiles of FP. HDAS was inversely associated with sweet and fatty TP, but positively with bitter TP. Contrary to our hypotheses, we did not observe associations between FP and children’s TP later in life. Further studies with higher FP variation and longitudinal design are needed to investigate the causal associations between infant FP and taste preferences later in life. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 17.
    Takahashi, Yuki
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden / Japanese Red Cross Toyota Coll Nursing, Aichi, Japan.
    Jonas, Wibke
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden / Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Ransjo-Arvidson, Anna-Berit
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lidfors, Lena
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Uvnäs Moberg, Kerstin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Nissen, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Weight loss and low age are associated with intensity of rooting behaviours in newborn infants2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 10, p. 1018-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Little is known about the developing breastfeeding behaviour of newborn infants. This study describes infants' prebreastfeeding behaviour during the second day of life and explores possible associations with infant characteristics. Methods: We studied 13 mothers and healthy full-term infants after normal births. At 2448 hours of life, the newborns were placed in skin-to-skin contact with their mothers for breastfeeding and were video-filmed. The order, frequency and duration of predefined infant prefeeding behaviours and suckling were coded and analysed using computer-based video software. Results: Prefeeding behaviours occurred in the following order: rooting, hand to mouth movements, licking of the nipple and hand to breast to mouth movements. The infants started to suckle at a median of one to two minutes. Rooting was the most common behaviour, observed in 12 infants. The duration of rooting movements during the last minute before breastfeeding was inversely related to neonatal age (p = 0.001) and positively related to neonatal weight loss (p = 0.02) after birth. Conclusion: Infants exhibited a distinct sequence of prefeeding behaviours during the second day of life, and our findings suggest that rooting movements were governed by mechanisms involved in the regulation of food intake and weight gain.

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