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  • 1.
    Ayukekbong, James A.
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, M. E.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vansarla, Goutham
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Tah, F.
    Camyaids Institute of Laboratory Diagnosis and Clinical Research, Douala, Cameroon.
    Nkuo-Akenji, T.
    Faculty of Science Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon.
    Lindh, M.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergström, T.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Monitoring of seasonality of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon by real-time PCR: an exploratory study2014In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 142, no 7, p. 1393-1402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the seasonal fluctuation of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon. Two hundred participants aged between 1 and 69 years were prospectively followed up. Each participant provided monthly faecal samples over a 12-month period. A total of 2484 samples were tested using multiplex real-time PCR assay for the detection of norovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus. The effect of weather variables and risk factors were analysed by Pearson correlation and bivariate analysis. Overall, enterovirus was the most commonly detected virus (216% of specimens), followed by norovirus (39%) and rotavirus (04%). Norovirus and enterovirus were detected throughout the year with a peak of norovirus detection at the beginning of the rainy season and a significant alternation of circulation of norovirus genogroups from one month to the next. Age <5 years and consumption of tap water were risk factors for norovirus infection. Better understanding of factors influencing transmission and seasonality may provide insights into the relationship between physical environment and risk of infection for these viruses.

  • 2.
    Bank, Sakarias Einar Sefik
    School of Psychology, University of Leeds, UK.
    Promoting Air Quality Policy Adoption and Change2021Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Air pollution is a localised issue but negatively influences health and finance globally. Conurbations and regional governments struggle to find the best policy solutions to meet air quality limit levels while competing over resources and attempting to secure growth. As such, methods to increase the adoption of effective pollution-focused policies are warranted. This thesis has set out to create a framework for understanding the relationship between behaviour change of policy makers and the adoption of new air quality policies at regional levels of government. Chapter four of this thesis looked into the quality and results of previous literature through a systematic review (study 1), investigating how previous interventions have attempted to promote policy adoption. Within chapter five, a vignette study with policy practitioners (study 2; n = 15) was conducted to evaluate the use of intervention functions. Alongside the vignette study, an online questionnaire looked at perceived barriers to policy adoption. Data from both were amalgamated using thematic analysis. Finally, in chapter six, the use of interventions to promote air quality policy and the state of current UK air quality policy was reviewed (study 3). Collectively these studies have contributed to the understanding of how intervention functions influence policy intention formation and policy adoption. The combined outcomes of these studies suggest a) a need for increased education of policymakers and b) for councils to share learning and take inspiration from each other. Throughout the studies, key barriers to policy intentions and policy adoption were investigated, the most prominent being economic and administrative barriers. Within chapter seven, results are summarised and directions for future research and practice are suggested.

  • 3.
    Behnsen, Pia
    et al.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Buil, Joanne M.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Koot, Susanne
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Van Lier, Poul
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Heart rate (variability) and the association between relational peer victimization and internalizing symptoms in elementary school children2020In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 521-529, article id PII S0954579419000269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relational victimization typically emerges first during the elementary school period, and has been associated with increased levels of internalizing symptoms in children. Individual differences in autonomic nervous system functioning have been suggested as a potential factor linking social stressors and internalizing symptoms. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether heart rate and heart rate variability mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms in 373 mainstream elementary school children. Children were assessed in 2015 (T 0 ; Grades 3-5, M age = 9.78 years, 51% boys) and reassessed in 2016 (T 1 ). Heart rate and heart rate variability were assessed during a regular school day at T 1 . A multi-informant (teacher and peer report) cross-time measure of relational victimization, and a multi-informant (self- and teacher report) measure of internalizing problems at T 1 was used. Results showed that heart rate variability, but not heart rate, mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms. This study provides tentative support that in children from a general population sample, a psychobiological factor may mediate the association of relational victimization with internalizing symptoms.

  • 4.
    El Ansari, Walid
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar ; College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar ; Department of Population Health, Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland ; Wellbeing Services, County of Southwest Finland, Finland.
    El-Ansari, Kareem
    School of Medicine, St. George's University, Grenada, West Indies.
    Šebeňa, René
    Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, Pavol Josef Šafárik University, Košice, Slovak Republic.
    Are behavioural risk factors clusters associated with self-reported health complaints?: University students in Finland2023In: Central European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1210-7778, E-ISSN 1803-1048, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 248-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: No previous research of university students in Finland assessed lifestyle behavioural risk factors (BRFs) and categorized students into clusters, explored the associations of the clusters with self-reported health complaints (HCs), whilst controlling for potential confounders. The current study undertook this task. METHODS: Students at the University of Turku (1,177) completed an online well-being questionnaire that assessed socio-demographic variables, 5 BRFs - problematic alcohol consumption, smoking, illicit drug use, food consumption habits, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and 22 HCs. A food frequency questionnaire assessed students' consumption of a range of foods, and a dietary guideline adherence score was computed based on WHO dietary recommendations for Europe. Three separate regression models appraised the associations between the cluster membership and HCs factors, adjusting for sex, income sufficiency and self-rated health. RESULTS: Mean age was 23 ± 5.2 years, 77% had never smoked and 79% never used illicit drug/s. Factor analysis of HCs resulted in four-factors (psychological, circulatory/breathing, gastro-intestinal, pains/aches); cluster analysis of BRFs identified two distinctive student clusters. Cluster 1 represented more healthy students who never smoked/used illicit drugs, had no problematic drinking, and undertook MVPA on 4.42 ± 3.36 days/week. As for cluster 2 students, half the cluster smoked occasionally/daily, used illicit drug/s, and > 50% had problematic drinking and students undertook MVPA on 4.02 ± 3.12 days/week. More cluster 2 students adhered to healthy eating recommendations, but the difference was not significant between clusters. Regression analysis revealed that females, those with sufficient income, and with excellent/very good self-rated general health were significantly less likely to report all four HCs. Cluster 2 students were significantly more likely to report psychological complaints, circulatory/breathing and gastro-intestinal complaints. There was no significant association between BRFs clusters and pains/aches factor. CONCLUSIONS: Risk taking students with less healthy lifestyles and behaviour were consistently associated with poorer psychological and somatic health.

  • 5.
    Fabisiak, Beata
    et al.
    Department of Furniture Design, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poland.
    Jankowska, Anna
    Department of Economics and Economic Policy in Agribusiness, Faculty of Economics, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poland.
    Kłos, Robert
    Department of Furniture Design, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poland.
    Knudsen, Joan
    Development Centre UMT, Secretariat for Lifestyle and Design Cluster, Herning, Denmark.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). University of Rhode Island, College of Nursing, Kingston, RI, United States.
    Kuprienko, Igor
    Project Development Division, ITMO University, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Vidiasova, Lyudmila
    e-Governance Center, Institute of Design and Urban Studies, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Poberznik, Anja
    Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Kreigere, Vineta
    Art Academy of Latvia, Rīga, Latvia.
    Preferences of seniors living in selected Baltic Sea region countries towards the use of indoor public space furniture2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 12 December 9, article id e0258676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demographic changes can be observed all over the world. The number of seniors located in the societies of well-developed countries continues to rise. Both enterprises and governments need to be prepared for such changes. Consequently, public spaces need to evolve to reduce problems related to ageism and be friendly to all. Much attention is currently being paid to finding solutions for redesigning public spaces and adjusting them to the needs and requirements of senior citizens. To identify the preferences of seniors in relation to the characteristics of furniture in indoor public spaces, a survey study with 1539 respondents aged 60+ was conducted in Denmark, Finland, Latvia, Poland, Russia and Sweden. The gathered data were coded and implemented to the unified database. The statistical grouping method was used to recognize the characteristics of the needs and attitudes of seniors related to the use of public space furniture. The main variables taken into consideration in the analysis were the age and gender of respondents and their country of living. Among the most important findings are those indicating the necessity to provide the increased number of furniture for sitting in the public spaces and making sure they are not located too far away from each other. As the main disadvantages of public space furniture respondents indicated the lack of armrests or other solutions to facilitate getting up and/or sitting down, as well as profiled backrests that constitute solid support for the spine. The implementation of these data in the process of rethinking and redesigning public spaces may support the adaptation of indoor public furniture according to the requirements of a very large group of customers, namely, seniors. 

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  • 6.
    Halme, Marie
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Rautava, Päivi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland ; Turku Clinical Research Centre, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Sillanmäki, Lauri
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland ; Turku Clinical Research Centre, Turku University Hospital, Finland ; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Sumanen, Markku
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland ; Turku Clinical Research Centre, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health and Centre for Population Health Research, University of Turku, Finland.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Finland.
    Salo, Paula
    Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland ; Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Educational level and the use of mental health services, psychotropic medication and psychotherapy among adults with a history of physician diagnosed mental disorders2023In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, ISSN 0020-7640, E-ISSN 1741-2854, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 493-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of mental disorders is increased among people of low socioeconomic status or educational level, but it remains unclear whether their access to treatment matches their increased need.

    Aims: Our objective was to examine whether educational level as an indicator of socioeconomic status is associated with use of mental health services, psychotropic medication and psychotherapy in Finland.

    Method: Cross-sectional data from a follow-up survey of a longitudinal, population-based cohort study were used to form a sample of 3,053 men and women aged 24 to 68 with a current or previous physician diagnosed mental disorder. The prevalence of mental disorders, mental health service use and educational level were assessed with self-report questionnaire. Educational level was determined by the highest educational attainment and grouped into three levels: high, intermediate and low. The associations between educational level and mental health service -related outcomes were assessed with binary logistic regression. Covariates in the fully adjusted model were age, gender and number of somatic diseases.

    Results: Compared to high educational level, low educational level was associated with higher odds of using antidepressants (OR 1.35, 95% CI [1.09, 1.66]), hypnotics (OR 1.33, 95% CI [1.07, 1.66]) and sedatives (OR 2.17, 95% CI [1.69, 2.78]), and lower odds of using mental health services (OR 0.80, 95% CI [0.65, 0.98]). No associations were found between educational level and use of psychotherapy.

    Conclusions: The results do not suggest a general socioeconomic status related mismatch. A pharmacological emphasis was observed in the treatment of low educational background participants, whereas overall mental health service use was emphasized among high educational background participants. 

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  • 7.
    Hammad, Yasser A.
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Shallik, Nabil A.
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar / Department of Anesthesia and SICU, Tanta University, Egypt.
    Sadek, Monzer H.
    Sidra Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Feki, Abdellatif M.
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Bedhiaf, Kaouther
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Khecharem, Fekria
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Shehata, Walid M.
    Department of Transplant Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Bali, Souad
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Muhammed, Abdulkader
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Quality improvement can decrease blood delivery turnaround time: Evidence from a single tertiary-care academic medical center2018In: Middle East Journal of Anesthesiology, ISSN 0544-0440, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 273-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Blood transfusion services are critical to any hospitals’ functioning, and timely blood/ component therapy resuscitation is lifesaving. Yet, few blood delivery turnaround time (TAT) studies have been undertaken. Aims: We assessed blood delivery TAT at our institution before and after implementing an intervention. Settings and Design: This before-after study assessed blood delivery TAT at our institution at baseline (first audit, December 2015 - February 2016); analyzed the causes of any delays and implemented a multipronged organizational, educational and operational remedial actions for risk mitigation for 3 months, aiming to shorten the blood delivery TAT; and then 9 months later assessed the blood delivery TAT again (second audit, November 2017 - December 2017). Methods and Material: For each of the two audits, we assessed three indices that comprise TAT: Response time (time from doctor’s request until blood is ready for collection, T1); processing time (time from the arrival of technician to blood bank and start of paperwork processing at the blood bank’s front desk until actual collection of the blood, T2); and, Transport time (time from blood bank to arrival to operating theatre, T3). Statistical analysis used: The observed proportions for categorical variables were reported as percentage and compared using Chi square test. Results: After implementing the remedial actions, the second audit confirmed considerable improvements across all three components that comprise the blood TAT. The transport time significantly decreased from an initial majority of > 15 mins duration, to a majority of < 15 mins transport time after the second audit; there was a 50% improvement in 30 mins response time; and the percentage of requests processed in < 10 mins were significantly higher after the second audit. Conclusions: Our program and its findings in terms of much improved blood delivery TAT after implementing this quality improvement approach represent an appropriate and effective solution to the challenge of making blood available fast enough to meet true hemorrhagic emergencies.

  • 8.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    et al.
    Department of Health Services Research and Policy London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine London United Kingdom / Finnish Institute of Occupational Health Tampere, Helsinki and Turku Finland.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Department of Public Health University of Turku and Turku University Hospital Turku Finland / Department of Public Health University of Helsinki Finland.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment Copenhagen Denmark.
    Lallukka, Tea
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health Tampere, Helsinki and Turku Finland / Department of Public Health University of Helsinki Finland.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health Tampere, Helsinki and Turku Finland / Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences University of Uppsala Sweden / Stress Research Institute University of Stockholm Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine Stockholm County Council Stockholm Sweden / Institute of Environmental Medicine Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden.
    Bjorner, Jakob
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment Copenhagen Denmark.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine Bispebjerg Hospital Copenhagen University Copenhagen Denmark.
    Brunner, Eric
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health University College London London United Kingdom.
    Burr, Hermann
    Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Berlin Germany.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health University College London London United Kingdom / Bristol Medical School: Population Health Sciences University of Bristol United Kingdom.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences Mid Sweden University Sundsvall Sweden.
    Koskinen, Aki
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health Tampere, Helsinki and Turku Finland.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stress Research Institute University of Stockholm Sweden.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stress Research Institute University of Stockholm Sweden.
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    Lægekonsulenten AS3 Companies Århus Denmark.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Department of Public Health University of Helsinki Finland.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health Tampere, Helsinki and Turku Finland.
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    VIVE The Danish Center for Social Science Research Copenhagen Denmark.
    Pietiläinen, Olli
    Department of Public Health University of Helsinki Finland.
    Rahkonen, Ossi
    Department of Public Health University of Helsinki Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment Copenhagen Denmark / Department of Public Health and Department of Psychology University of Copenhagen Denmark.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health University College London London United Kingdom.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health University College London London United Kingdom.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Public Health University of Turku and Turku University Hospital Turku Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stress Research Institute University of Stockholm Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health University of Turku and Turku University Hospital Turku Finland.
    Väänänen, Ari
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health Tampere, Helsinki and Turku Finland.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute University of Stockholm Sweden.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Public Health University of Helsinki Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health University College London London United Kingdom.
    Job Strain as a Risk Factor for Peripheral Artery Disease: A Multi-Cohort Study2020In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e013538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Job strain is implicated in many atherosclerotic diseases, but its role in peripheral artery disease (PAD) is unclear. We investigated the association of job strain with hospital records of PAD, using individual-level data from 11 prospective cohort studies from Finland, Sweden, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. Methods and Results Job strain (high demands and low control at work) was self-reported at baseline (1985-2008). PAD records were ascertained from national hospitalization data. We used Cox regression to examine the associations of job strain with PAD in each study, and combined the study-specific estimates in random effects meta-analyses. We used τ2, I2, and subgroup analyses to examine heterogeneity. Of the 139 132 participants with no previous hospitalization with PAD, 32 489 (23.4%) reported job strain at baseline. During 1 718 132 person-years at risk (mean follow-up 12.8 years), 667 individuals had a hospital record of PAD (3.88 per 10 000 person-years). Job strain was associated with a 1.41-fold (95% CI, 1.11-1.80) increased average risk of hospitalization with PAD. The study-specific estimates were moderately heterogeneous (τ2=0.0427, I2: 26.9%). Despite variation in their magnitude, the estimates were consistent in both sexes, across the socioeconomic hierarchy and by baseline smoking status. Additional adjustment for baseline diabetes mellitus did not change the direction or magnitude of the observed associations. Conclusions Job strain was associated with small but consistent increase in the risk of hospitalization with PAD, with the relative risks on par with those for coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke.

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  • 9.
    Holford, Dawn
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Essex, United Kingdom ; School of Psychological Science, University of Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Tognon, Gianluca
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Gladwell, Valerie
    School of Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences, University of Essex, United Kingdom ; Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Suffolk, United Kingdom.
    Murray, Kelly
    School of Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences, University of Essex, United Kingdom.
    Nicoll, Mark
    Keep Fit Eat Fit Wellbeing Ltd, Chelmsford, United Kingdom.
    Knox, Angela
    Keep Fit Eat Fit Wellbeing Ltd, Chelmsford, United Kingdom.
    McCloy, Rachel
    School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, United Kingdom.
    Loaiza, Vanessa
    Department of Psychology, University of Essex, United Kingdom.
    Planning engagement with web resources to improve diet quality and break up sedentary time for home-working employees: A mixed methods study2023In: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, ISSN 1076-8998, E-ISSN 1939-1307, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 224-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As home working becomes more common, employers may struggle to provide health promotion interventions that can successfully bridge the gap between employees' intentions to engage in healthier behaviors and actual action. Based on past evidence that action planning can successfully encourage the adoption of healthier behaviors, this mixed-methods study of a web-based self-help intervention incorporated a randomized planning trial that included quantitative measures of engagement and follow-up qualitative interviews with a subsample of participants. Participants either (a) selected a movement plan for incorporating a series of 2-min exercise videos into their work week to break up sedentary time and a balanced meal plan with recipe cards for a week's lunches and dinners or (b) received access to these resources without a plan. Selecting a movement plan was more effective at increasing engagement with the web resources compared to the no-plan condition. In the follow-up interviews, participants indicated that the plan helped to remind participants to engage with the resources and made it simpler for them to follow the guidance for exercises and meals. Ease of use and being able to fit exercises and meals around work tasks were key factors that facilitated uptake of the resources, while lack of time and worries about how colleagues would perceive them taking breaks to use the resources were barriers to uptake. Participants' self-efficacy was associated with general resource use but not plan adherence. Overall, including plans with online self-help resources could enhance their uptake. 

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  • 10.
    Hultén, Anna-Maria
    et al.
    Unit of Occupational Therapy, Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Kristina
    Unit of Occupational Therapy, Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerkeli, Pernilla
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Work-related stress, reason for consultation and diagnosis-specific sick leave: How do they add up?2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 7, article id e0288751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work-related stress is common in Western society and disorders associated with stress are often managed in primary health care. This study was set to increase the understanding of the relationship between reason for consultation, work-related stress and diagnosis-specific sick leave for primary health care patients. The longitudinal observational study included 232 employed non-sick listed patients at seven primary health care centres in Sweden. Of these patients, 102 reported high work-related stress, as measured with the Work Stress Questionnaire, and 84 were on registered sick leave within one year after inclusion. The study showed that, compared to those who did not report high work-related stress, highly stressed patients more often sought care for mental symptoms (60/102 versus 24/130), sleep disturbance (37/102 versus 22/130) and fatigue (41/102 versus 34/130). The risk for sick leave with a mental diagnosis within a year after base-line was higher among patients reporting high work-related stress than among those who did not (RR 2.97, 95% CI 1.59;5.55). No such association was however found for the risk of sick leave with a musculoskeletal diagnosis (RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.22;1.37). Seeking care for mental symptoms, sleep disturbance and fatigue were associated with having a future mental sick leave diagnosis (p-values < 0.001), while seeking care for musculoskeletal symptoms was associated with having a future musculoskeletal sick leave diagnosis (p-value 0.009). In summary, compared to those who did not report high work-related stress, patients with high work-related stress more often sought care for mental symptoms, sleep disturbance and fatigue which lead to a mental sick leave diagnosis. Reporting high work-related stress was, however, not linked to having sought care for musculoskeletal symptoms nor future sick leave due to a musculoskeletal diagnosis. Hence, both patients and general practitioners seem to characterize work-related stress as a mental complaint.

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  • 11.
    Karlsson, Ida K.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Institute of Gerontology and Aging Research Network – Jönköping (ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Malin
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Yunzhang
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jylhävä, Juulia
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hägg, Sara
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Institute of Gerontology and Aging Research Network – Jönköping (ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, United States.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Epigenome-wide association study of level and change in cognitive abilities from midlife through late life2021In: Clinical Epigenetics, ISSN 1868-7075, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epigenetic mechanisms are important in aging and may be involved in late-life changes in cognitive abilities. We conducted an epigenome-wide association study of leukocyte DNA methylation in relation to level and change in cognitive abilities, from midlife through late life in 535 Swedish twins. Results: Methylation levels were measured with the Infinium Human Methylation 450 K or Infinium MethylationEPIC array, and all sites passing quality control on both arrays were selected for analysis (n = 250,816). Empirical Bayes estimates of individual intercept (age 65), linear, and quadratic change were obtained from latent growth curve models of cognitive traits and used as outcomes in linear regression models. Significant sites (p &lt; 2.4 × 10–7) were followed up in between-within twin pair models adjusting for familial confounding and full-growth modeling. We identified six significant associations between DNA methylation and level of cognitive abilities at age 65: cg18064256 (PPP1R13L) with processing speed and spatial ability; cg04549090 (NRXN3) with spatial ability; cg09988380 (POGZ), cg25651129 (-), and cg08011941 (ENTPD8) with working memory. The genes are involved in neuroinflammation, neuropsychiatric disorders, and ATP metabolism. Within-pair associations were approximately half that of between-pair associations across all sites. In full-growth curve models, associations between DNA methylation and cognitive level at age 65 were of small effect sizes, and associations between DNA methylation and longitudinal change in cognitive abilities of very small effect sizes. Conclusions: Leukocyte DNA methylation was associated with level, but not change in cognitive abilities. The associations were substantially attenuated in within-pair analyses, indicating they are influenced in part by genetic factors. 

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  • 12.
    Karlsson, Ida K.
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology and Aging Research Network—Jönköping (ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden ; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Malin
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Yunzhang
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jylhävä, Juulia
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hägg, Sara
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Institute of Gerontology and Aging Research Network—Jönköping (ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden ; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Replicating associations between DNA methylation and body mass index in a longitudinal sample of older twins2020In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 1397-1405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    There is an important interplay between epigenetic factors and body weight, and previous work has identified ten sites where DNA methylation is robustly associated with body mass index (BMI) cross-sectionally. However, interpretation of the associations is complicated by the substantial changes in BMI often occurring in late-life, and the fact that methylation is often driven by genetic variation. This study therefore investigated the longitudinal association between these ten sites and BMI from midlife to late-life, and whether associations persist after controlling for genetic factors.

    Methods:

    We used data from 535 individuals (mean age 68) in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA) with longitudinal measures of both DNA methylation from blood samples and BMI, spanning up to 20 years. Methylation levels were measured with the Infinium Human Methylation 450K or Infinium MethylationEpic array, with seven of the ten sites passing quality control. Latent growth curve models were applied to investigate longitudinal associations between methylation and BMI, and between–within models to study associations within twin pairs, thus adjusting for genetic factors.

    Results:

    Baseline DNA methylation levels at five of the seven sites were associated with BMI level at age 65 (cg00574958 [CPT1A]; cg11024682 [SREBF1]), and/or change (cg06192883 [MYO5C]; cg06946797 [RMI2]; cg08857797 [VPS25]). For four of the five sites, the associations remained comparable within twin pairs. However, the effects of cg06192883 were substantially attenuated within pairs. No change in DNA methylation was detected for any of the seven evaluated sites.

    Conclusion:

    Five of the seven sites investigated were associated with late-life level and/or change in BMI. The effects for four of the sites remained similar when examined within twin pairs, indicating that the associations are mainly environmentally driven. However, the substantial attenuation in the association between cg06192883 and late-life BMI within pairs points to the importance of genetic factors in this association.

  • 13.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    University College London (UCL) Brain Sciences, UCL, London, United Kingdom ; Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland ; Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Batty, G. David
    University College London (UCL) Brain Sciences, UCL, London, United Kingdom.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland ; Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland ; Department of Public Health, University of Turku (UTU), Finland ; Centre for Population Health Research, UTU, Turku, Finland.
    Suomi, Juuso
    Department of Geography and Geology, UTU, Turku, Finland.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland ; Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Merikanto, Joonas
    Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nordling, Kalle
    Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland ; Centre for International Climate and Environmental Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Ervasti, Jenni
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Public Health, University of Turku (UTU), Finland ; Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Partanen, Antti-Ilari
    Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Stenholm, Sari
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku (UTU), Finland ; Centre for Population Health Research, UTU, Turku, Finland.
    Käyhkö, Jukka
    Department of Geography and Geology, UTU, Turku, Finland.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku (UTU), Finland ; Centre for Population Health Research, UTU, Turku, Finland ; Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Climate Change, Summer Temperature, and Heat-Related Mortality in Finland: Multicohort Study with Projections for a Sustainable vs. Fossil-Fueled Future to 20502023In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 131, no 12, p. 1270201-1-1270201-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Climate change scenarios illustrate various pathways in terms of global warming ranging from "sustainable development" (Shared Socioeconomic Pathway SSP1-1.9), the best-case scenario, to 'fossil-fueled development' (SSP5-8.5), the worst-case scenario. OBJECTIVES: We examined the extent to which increase in daily average urban summer temperature is associated with future cause-specific mortality and projected heat-related mortality burden for the current warming trend and these two scenarios. METHODS: We did an observational cohort study of 363,754 participants living in six cities in Finland. Using residential addresses, participants were linked to daily temperature records and electronic death records from national registries during summers (1 May to 30 September) 2000 to 2018. For each day of observation, heat index (average daily air temperature weighted by humidity) for the preceding 7 d was calculated for participants' residential area using a geographic grid at a spatial resolution of formula presented . We examined associations of the summer heat index with risk of death by cause for all participants adjusting for a wide range of individual-level covariates and in subsidiary analyses using case-crossover design, computed the related period population attributable fraction (PAF), and projected change in PAF from summers 2000-2018 compared with those in 2030-2050. RESULTS: During a cohort total exposure period of 582,111,979 summer days (3,880,746 person-summers), we recorded 4,094 deaths, including 949 from cardiovascular disease. The multivariable-adjusted rate ratio (RR) for high (formula presented ) vs. reference (formula presented ) heat index was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.28, 2.27) for cardiovascular mortality, but it did not reach statistical significance for noncardiovascular deaths, formula presented (95% CI: 0.96, 1.36), a finding replicated in case-crossover analysis. According to projections for 2030-2050, PAF of summertime cardiovascular mortality attributable to high heat will be 4.4% (1.8%-7.3%) under the sustainable development scenario, but 7.6% (3.2%-12.3%) under the fossil-fueled development scenario. In the six cities, the estimated annual number of summertime heat-related cardiovascular deaths under the two scenarios will be 174 and 298 for a total population of 1,759,468 people. DISCUSSION: The increase in average urban summer temperature will raise heat-related cardiovascular mortality burden. The estimated magnitude of this burden is formula presented times greater if future climate change is driven by fossil fuels rather than sustainable development. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP12080.

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  • 14.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, United Kingdom / Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland / Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Batty, G. David
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, United Kingdom / Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom.
    Kawachi, Ichiro
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Social & Behav Sci, Boston, USA.
    Jokela, Markus
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Dept Psychol & Logoped, Helsinki, Finland.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden / Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjorner, Jakob B.
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Bispebjerg Univ Hosp Copenhagen, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Burr, Hermann
    Fed Inst Occupat Safety & Hlth BAuA, Berlin, Germany.
    Dragano, Nico
    Univ Düsseldorf, Inst Med Sociol, Fac Med, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Jönköping, Sweden / Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Hlth Serv Res & Policy, London, United Kingdom / Royal Coll Surgeons England, Clin Effectiveness Unit, London, United Kingdom.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kumari, Meena
    Univ Essex, Inst Social & Econ Res, Wivenhoe Pk, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    AS3 Co, AS3 Employment, Viby, Denmark.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden / Umeå Univ, Dept Psychol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    Danish Natl Ctr Social Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark / Univ Copenhagen, Dept Publ Hlth, Copenhagen, Denmark / Univ Copenhagen, Dept Psychol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland / Univ Turku, Dept Psychol, Turku, Finland.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England, United Kingdom.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Univ Turku, Dept Publ Hlth, Turku, Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Univ Turku, Dept Publ Hlth, Turku, Finland / Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Akad Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England, United Kingdom.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Hop Paul Brousse, INSERM, U1018, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Villejuif, France.
    Hamer, Mark
    Loughborough Univ Technol, Natl Ctr Sport & Exercise Med, Sch Sport Exercise & Hlth Sci, Loughborough, Leics, England, United Kingdom.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Bristol, Avon, England, United Kingdom.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tabak, Adam G.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England, United Kingdom / Semmelweis Univ, Fac Med, Dept Med 1, Budapest, Hungary.
    Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation: a multi-cohort study2017In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 38, no 34, p. 2621-2628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Studies suggest that people who work long hours are at increased risk of stroke, but the association of long working hours with atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia and a risk factor for stroke, is unknown. We examined the risk of atrial fibrillation in individuals working long hours (>= 55 per week) and those working standard 35-40 h/week. Methods and results In this prospective multi-cohort study from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium, the study population was 85 494 working men and women (mean age 43.4 years) with no recorded atrial fibrillation. Working hours were assessed at study baseline (1991-2004). Mean follow-up for incident atrial fibrillation was 10 years and cases were defined using data on electrocardiograms, hospital records, drug reimbursement registers, and death certificates. We identified 1061 new cases of atrial fibrillation (10-year cumulative incidence 12.4 per 1000). After adjustment for age, sex and socioeconomic status, individuals working long hours had a 1.4-fold increased risk of atrial fibrillation compared with those working standard hours (hazard ratio = 1.42, 95% CI= 1.13-1.80, P= 0.003). There was no significant heterogeneity between the cohort-specific effect estimates (I-2= 0%, P = 0.66) and the finding remained after excluding participants with coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline or during the follow-up (N= 2006, hazard ratio= 1.36, 95% CI= 1.05-1.76, P = 0.0180). Adjustment for potential confounding factors, such as obesity, risky alcohol use and high blood pressure, had little impact on this association. Conclusion Individuals who worked long hours were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those working standard hours.

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  • 15.
    Lilje, Stina C.
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Skillgate, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden ; Scandinavian College of Naprapathic Manual Therapy, Kräftriket, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Negative psychosocial and heavy physical workloads associated with musculoskeletal pain interfering with normal life in older adults: Cross-sectional analysis2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Pain is one of the most frequent reasons for seeking health care, and is thus a public health problem. Although there is a progressive increase in pain and impaired physical function with age, few studies are performed on older adults. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are associations between musculoskeletal pain interfering with normal life in older adults and physical and psychosocial workloads through life. Methods: The association of heavy physical workload and negative psychosocial workload and musculoskeletal pain interfering with normal life (SF 12) was analyzed by multiple logistic regression. The model was adjusted for eight background covariates: age, gender, growing-up environment, educational level, if living alone or not, obesity, smoking, and leisure physical activity. Results: Negative psychosocial and heavy physical workloads were independently associated with musculoskeletal pain interfering with normal life (adjusted OR: 4.44, 95% CI: 2.84-6.92), and (adjusted OR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.20-2.93), respectively. The background covariates female gender and higher education were also associated with musculoskeletal pain interfering with normal life, and physical leisure activity was inversely associated. Conclusions: The findings suggest that negative psychosocial and heavy physical workloads are strongly associated with musculoskeletal pain interfering with normal life in older adults.

  • 16.
    Lind, Carl Mikael
    et al.
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Yang, Liyun
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, Virtual Engineering Research Environment. User Centred Product Design, Global Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden / Faculty of Textiles, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lu, Ke
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Reducing postural load in order picking through a smart workwear system using real-time vibrotactile feedback2020In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 89, article id 103188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibrotactile feedback training may be one possible method for interventions that target at learning better work techniques and improving postures in manual handling. This study aimed to evaluate the short term effect of real-time vibrotactile feedback on postural exposure using a smart workwear system for work postures intervention in simulated industrial order picking. Fifteen workers at an industrial manufacturing plant performed order-picking tasks, in which the vibrotactile feedback was used for postural training at work. The system recorded the trunk and upper arm postures. Questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were conducted about the users’ experience of the system. The results showed reduced time in trunk inclination ≥20°, ≥30° and ≥45° and dominant upper arm elevation ≥30° and ≥45° when the workers received feedback, and for trunk inclination ≥20°, ≥30° and ≥45° and dominant upper arm elevation ≥30°, after feedback withdrawal. The workers perceived the system as useable, comfortable, and supportive for learning. The system has the potential of contributing to improved postures in order picking through an automated short-term training program. © 2020 Elsevier Ltd

  • 17.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    et al.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rod, Naja Hulvej
    Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Peristera, Paraskevi
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark / Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lamontagne, Anthony D.
    McCaughey Centre, Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia / Population Health Strategic Research Centre, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia.
    Milner, Allison
    Disability and Health Unit, Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Lange, Theis
    Section of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Stenholm, Sari
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Xu, Tianwei
    Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease2019In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 76, p. 785-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Several recent large-scale studies have indicated a prospective association between job strain and coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Job strain is also associated with poorer mental health, a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. This study investigates the prospective relationships between change in job strain, poor mental health and cardiometabolic disease, and whether poor mental health is a potential mediator of the relationship between job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Methods: We used data from five cohort studies from Australia, Finland, Sweden and UK, including 47 757 men and women. Data on job strain across two measurements 1-5 years apart (time 1 (T1)-time 2 (T2)) were used to define increase or decrease in job strain. Poor mental health (symptoms in the top 25% of the distribution of the scales) at T2 was considered a potential mediator in relation to incident cardiometabolic disease, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, following T2 for a mean of 5-18 years. Results: An increase in job strain was associated with poor mental health (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.76), and a decrease in job strain was associated with lower risk in women (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.60-0.84). However, no clear association was observed between poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.23), nor between increase (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.14) and decrease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22) in job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Conclusions: The results did not support that change in job strain is a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease and yielded no support for poor mental health as a mediator.

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  • 18.
    Paul, Sudip Kumar
    et al.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh / Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh.
    Islam, Md Shofikul
    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh.
    Hasibuzzaman, M. M.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Faruk
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Anjum, Adiba
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Saud, Zahangir Alam
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Haque, Md Mominul
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Sultana, Papia
    Department of Statistics, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Haque, Azizul
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, United States.
    Andric, Klara Biljana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Rahman, Aminur
    The Life Science Center, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, SE 701 82, Sweden.
    Karim, M. Rezaul
    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Bangladesh.
    Siddique, Abu Eabrahim
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Karim, Yeasir
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Mizanur
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Miyataka, Hideki
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, Japan.
    Xin, Lian
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Himeno, Seiichiro
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Higher risk of hyperglycemia with greater susceptibility in females in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals in Bangladesh2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 668, p. 1004-1012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) toxicity and diabetes mellitus (DM) are emerging public health concerns worldwide. Although exposure to high levels of As has been associated with DM, whether there is also an association between low and moderate As exposure and DM remains unclear. We explored the dose-dependent association between As exposure levels and hyperglycemia, with special consideration of the impact of demographic variables, in 641 subjects from rural Bangladesh. The total study participants were divided into three groups depending on their levels of exposure to As in drinking water (low, moderate and high exposure groups). Prevalence of hyperglycemia, including impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and DM was significantly associated with the subjects’ drinking water arsenic levels. Almost all exposure metrics (As levels in the subjects’ drinking water, hair and nails) showed dose-dependent associations with the risk of hyperglycemia, IGT and DM. Among the variables considered, sex, age, and BMI were found to be associated with higher risk of hyperglycemia, IGT and DM. In sex-stratified analyses, As exposure showed a clearer pattern of dose-dependent risk for hyperglycemia in females than males. Finally, drinking water containing low-to-moderate levels of As (50.01–150 μg/L) was found to confer a greater risk of hyperglycemia than safe drinking water (As ≤10 μg/L). Thus the results suggested that As exposure was dose-dependently associated with hyperglycemia, especially in females. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.

  • 19.
    Thapa, Dip Raj
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    Faculty of Health Sciences, VID Specialized University, Sandnes, Norway / The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden / Department of Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Support and resources to promote and sustain health among nurses and midwives in the workplace: A qualitative study2021In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 166-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Registered nurses and midwives are in short supply and have among the highest rates of sick leave in the global workforce. The aim of this study was therefore to explore and gain a deeper understanding of how nurses and midwives experience their everyday work, with a view toward promoting and sustaining their work-related health. Nine registered nurses and four registered midwives working in hospitals and community healthcare facilities in Sweden were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using content analysis. This study is reported in accordance with COREQ. One main category emerged: ‘Quality of organizational and collegial support and opportunities to facilitate recovery, health, and patient care’. From this category, four generic categories describing the overall experiences of registered nurses and midwives could be discerned. Based on these results, it is recommended that employers adopt a systematic health-promotive approach to foster and maintain the workplace health of registered nurses and midwives.

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  • 20.
    Van Dijk, Willeke
    et al.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja C.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Muller, Jasmin
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Section of Anthrozoology and Applied Ethology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    The Effect of Mechanical Massage and Mental Training on Heart Rate Variability and Cortisol in Swedish Employees: A Randomized Explorative Pilot Study2020In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 8, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work-related stress is relatively common in modern society and is a major cause of sick-leave. Thus, effective stress reducing interventions are needed. This study examined the effects of mental training and mechanical massage, on employee's heart rate variability (HRV) and plasma cortisol at their workplaces. Moreover, it was investigated whether baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) can explain differences in effectiveness of the intervention. Ninety-three participants from four workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the five programs: (I) Mechanical massage and mental training combined, II) Mechanical massage, III) Mental training, IV) Pause, or V) Control. HRV and plasma cortisol were measured at baseline and after 4 and 8 weeks. SBP was measured at baseline. On the reduction of cortisol levels, a small effect of the mechanical massage program was found, whereas no effect was found for the other programs. None of the programs showed any effect on HRV. Nonetheless, when the level of systolic blood pressure was taken into account, some small beneficial effects on HRV and cortisol of mental training and the mechanical massage were found. This exploratory pilot-study provides useful information for future studies that aim to reduce stress among employees. 

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  • 21.
    Yewale, Priti
    et al.
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Wagle, Neeta
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Lenka, Shaurya
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Bannigol, Pramila
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Junnarkar, Manisha
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Prakash, Divya
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Stigh, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sahasrabudhe, Tushar
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Vannalwar, Tejas
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Thakare, Prasad
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Nikam, Dhiraj
    De Novo Tech, Dapodi, Pune, India.
    Pawar, Sarika
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Nawani, Neelu
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Studies on Biosmotrap: A multipurpose biological air purifier to minimize indoor and outdoor air pollution2022In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 357, article id 132001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air pollution is a serious health concern that affects many people across the globe. The major air pollutants are particulate matter, carbon oxides, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatics and free radicals which cause severe respiratory distress and infections. The existing air cleaning systems suffer from drawbacks of high cost and generation of secondary pollutants. A novel biological air filter “Biosmotrap” which is a laminate composite of sponge gourd and algae was developed. Biosmotrap placed in a carrier assembly on exhaust of vehicles, could remove carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) from the vehicular emissions resulting in cleaner emissions. Biosmotrap decreased carbon monoxide from 1,423,992 μg/m3 to 76,756 μg/m3, nitric oxide from 71,128 μg/m3 to 9982 μg/m3, nitrogen dioxide from 565 μg/m3 to 188 μg/m3 and PM2.5 from 3200 μg/m3 to 60 μg/m3 from a polluting vehicle. Biosmotrap removed 60–80% of indoor pollutants from cigarette smoke and incense-stick smoke. Biosmotrap could protect the human cells from oxidative DNA damage induced by indoor air pollutants. Hibiscus rosa-sinensis plants exposed to air filtered through Biosmotrap were healthy as compared to the plants directly exposed to polluted air. Biosmotrap is an economic, efficient, eco-friendly filter that is superior to existing air filtration methods. 

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