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  • 1.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment. Faculty of Theology, Diaconia and Leadership Studies, VID Specialized University, Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, Nomie
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Müllern, Tomas
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Clinicians' psychological empowerment to engage in management as part of their daily work2022In: Journal of Health Organization & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 272-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the article is to analyze how physicians and nurses, as the two major health care professions, experience psychological empowerment for managerial work. Design/methodology/approach: The study was designed as a qualitative interview study at four primary care centers (PCCs) in Sweden. In total, 47 interviews were conducted, mainly with physicians and nurses. The first inductive analysis led us to the concept of psychological empowerment, which was used in the next deductive step of the analysis. Findings: The study showed that both professions experienced self-determination for managerial work, but that nurses were more dependent on structural empowerment. Nurses experienced that they had competence for managerial work, whereas physicians were more ignorant of such competence. Nurses used managerial work to create impact on the conditions for their clinical work, whereas physicians experienced impact independently. Both nurses and physicians experienced managerial work as meaningful, but less meaningful than nurses and physicians' clinical work. Practical implications: For an effective health care system, structural changes in terms of positions, roles, and responsibilities can be an important route for especially nurses' psychological empowerment. Originality/value: The qualitative method provided a complementary understanding of psychological empowerment on how psychological empowerment interacted with other factors. One such aspect was nurses' higher dependence on structural empowerment, but the most important aspect was that both physicians and nurses experienced that managerial work was less meaningful than clinical work. This implies that psychological empowerment for managerial work may only make a difference if psychological empowerment does not compete with physicians' and nurses' clinical work. 

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  • 2.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Eriksson, Nomie
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Müllern, Tomas
    Jönköping University, IHH, Redovisning, Marknadsföring, SCM, Informatik och Rättsvetenskap.
    Patients' perceptions of quality in Swedish primary care - a study of differences between private and public ownership2021In: Journal of Health Organization & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 85-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the paper is to describe and analyze differences in patients' quality perceptions of private and public primary care centers in Sweden.

    DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The article explores the differences in quality perceptions between patients of public and private primary care centers based on data from a large patient survey in Sweden. The survey covers seven dimensions, and in this paper the measure Overall impression was used for the comparison. With more than 80,000 valid responses, the survey covers all primary care centers in Sweden which allowed for a detailed analysis of differences in quality perceptions among patients from the different categories of owners.

    FINDINGS: The article contributes with a detailed description of different types of private owners: not-for-profit and for profit, as well as corporate groups and independent care centers. The results show a higher quality perception for independent centers compared to both public and corporate groups.

    RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The small number of not-for-profit centers (21 out of 1,117 centers) does not allow for clear conclusions for this group. The results, however, indicate an even higher patient quality perception for not-for-profit centers. The study focus on describing differences in quality perceptions between the owner categories. Future research can contribute with explanations to why independent care centers receive higher patient satisfaction.

    SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS: The results from the study have policy implications both in a Swedish as well as international perspective. The differentiation between different types of private owners made in this paper opens up for interesting discussions on privatization of healthcare and how it affects patient satisfaction.

    ORIGINALITY/VALUE: The main contribution of the paper is the detailed comparison of different categories of private owners and the public owners.

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  • 3.
    Andréen, Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Socialt välbefinnade hos barnmorskor inom förlossnings-/ BB-vård: En tvärsnittsstudie baserad på Job Related Social Well-being Scale2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 4.
    Beheshtinia, Mohammad Ali
    et al.
    Industrial Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Semnan University, Iran.
    Jafari Kahoo, Sanaz
    Industrial Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Semnan University, Iran.
    Fathi, Masood
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, Virtual Engineering Research Environment. Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Prioritizing healthcare waste disposal methods considering environmental health using an enhanced multi-criteria decision-making method2023In: Environmental Pollutants and Bioavailability, ISSN 2639-5932, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 250-269, article id 2218568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Healthcare Waste Disposal Method Selection (HCWDMS) is a complicated problem due to multiple and often contradictory criteria with different importance degrees. Thus, decision-makers are restored to multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) methods to prioritize and select the best HCW disposal methods. This study introduces an enhanced MCDM method to deal with the HCWDMS problem. To address the problem, a comprehensive list of criteria and HCW disposal methods are identified. All the criteria are categorized into four main criteria, and Fuzzy Analysis Hierarchy Process is used to determine the weights of considered criteria and sub-criteria. The study results show that environmental, economic, technical, and social criteria are the most important in selecting disposal methods, respectively. Moreover, the sub-criteria of ‘Health Risk’, ‘Release with health effects’, and ‘Capital cost’ have the highest importance, respectively. Additionally, the methods of ‘Microwave’, ‘Sterilization by autoclave’, and ‘Reverse polymerization’ have the highest priority, respectively.

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  • 5.
    Burdžović, Erna
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    Information Security in Healthcare: Security challenges and opportunities within integrated electronic health record systems2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years healthcare industry has been rapidly changing towards digital solutions and migrating from paper-based systems to electronic health records (EHR) systems. Digitalisation within healthcare and EHR systems has brought many improvements in healthcare. However, digitalisation has also brought a lot of challenges and security risks. In 2017, the Region of Västra Götaland in Sweden decided to reorganise healthcare with an integrated healthcare record system, Millennium. As a result, patient information will be managed and communicated between various healthcare actors and organisations. Therefore, it is crucial to investigate the security challenges and opportunities with integrated patient record systems. To get insight into the security challenges and opportunities of an integrated patient record system, the following research question was formulated for the study: What information security challenges and opportunities are there with an integrated electronic health record system on a regional level?

    To answer the research question and achieve the purpose of the study, a qualitative method with semi-structured interviews as a collection technique was chosen. The interviews were conducted with people responsible for the implementation of Millennium, a program owner, and a Data Protection Officer. As a result, the empirical data identified new opportunities and challenges. The conclusion drawn from the result is several security challenges and opportunities within integrated EHR. For example, some identified opportunities are easy to access medical data, equal healthcare, and improved healthcare patient safety. Finally, some identified challenges are a compromise of confidentiality, integrity, availability, and security breaches like hacking and unauthorised access.

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  • 6.
    Bärkås, Annika
    et al.
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; MedTech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kharko, Anna
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; MedTech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden ; Faculty of Health, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, United Kingdom.
    Blease, Charlotte
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; MedTech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden ; Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansen Fagerlund, Asbjorn
    Norwegian Centre for E-Health Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Huvila, Isto
    Department of ALM, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansen, Monika Alise
    Norwegian Centre for E-Health Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway ; Department of Clinical Medicine, Telemedicine and E-health Research Group, Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Kane, Bridget
    Business School, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Kujala, Sari
    Department of Computer Science, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Moll, Jonas
    Centre for Empirical Research on Information Systems, School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Centre for Empirical Research on Information Systems, School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Wang, Bo
    Norwegian Centre for E-Health Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Hägglund, Maria
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; MedTech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Errors, Omissions, and Offenses in the Health Record of Mental Health Care Patients: Results from a Nationwide Survey in Sweden2023In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 25, article id e47841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous research reports that patients with mental health conditions experience benefits, for example, increased empowerment and validation, from reading their patient-accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs). In mental health care (MHC), PAEHRs remain controversial, as health care professionals are concerned that patients may feel worried or offended by the content of the notes. Moreover, existing research has focused on specific mental health diagnoses, excluding the larger PAEHR userbase with experience in MHC. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to establish if and how the experiences of patients with and those without MHC differ in using their PAEHRs by (1) comparing patient characteristics and differences in using the national patient portal between the 2 groups and (2) establishing group differences in the prevalence of negative experiences, for example, rates of errors, omissions, and offenses between the 2 groups. METHODS: Our analysis was performed on data from an online patient survey distributed through the Swedish national patient portal as part of our international research project, NORDeHEALTH. The respondents were patient users of the national patient portal 1177, aged 15 years or older, and categorized either as those with MHC experience or with any other health care experience (nonmental health care [non-MHC]). Patient characteristics such as gender, age, education, employment, and health status were gathered. Portal use characteristics included frequency of access, encouragement to read the record, and instances of positive and negative experiences. Negative experiences were further explored through rates of error, omission, and offense. The data were summarized through descriptive statistics. Group differences were analyzed through Pearson chi-square. RESULTS: Of the total sample (N=12,334), MHC respondents (n=3131) experienced errors (1586/3131, 50.65%, and non-MHC 3311/9203, 35.98%), omissions (1089/3131, 34.78%, and non-MHC 2427/9203, 26.37%) and offenses (1183/3131, 37.78%, and non-MHC 1616/9203, 17.56%) in the electronic health record at a higher rate than non-MHC respondents (n=9203). Respondents reported that the identified error (MHC 795/3131, 50.13%, and non-MHC 1366/9203, 41.26%) and omission (MHC 622/3131, 57.12%, and non-MHC 1329/9203, 54.76%) were "very important," but most did nothing to correct them (MHC 792/3131, 41.29%, and non-MHC 1838/9203, 42.17%). Most of the respondents identified as women in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: About 1 in 2 MHC patients identified an error in the record, and about 1 in 3 identified an omission, both at a much higher rate than in the non-MHC group. Patients with MHC also felt offended by the content of the notes more commonly (1 in 3 vs 1 in 6). These findings validate some of the worries expressed by health care professionals about providing patients with MHC with PAEHRs and highlight challenges with the documentation quality in the records. 

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  • 7.
    Bärkås, Annika
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kharko, Anna
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Hägglund, Maria
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Patients' Experiences of Unwanted Access to Their Online Health Records2023In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 302, p. 356-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient-Accessible Electronic Health Records (PAEHR) are particularly disputed in mental healthcare. We aim to explore if there is any association between patients having a mental health condition and someone unwanted seeing their PAEHR. A chi-square test showed a statistically significant association between group belonging and experiences of someone unwanted seeing their PAEHR.

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  • 8.
    Bärkås, Annika
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Blease, Charlotte
    General Medicine and Primary Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, United States.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Maria
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Patients’ access to their psychiatric notes: Current policies and practices in Sweden2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 17, article id 9140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients’ access to electronic health records (EHRs) is debated worldwide, and access to psychiatry records is even more criticized. There is a nationwide service in Sweden which offers all citizens the opportunity to read their EHR, including clinical notes. This study aims to explore Swedish national and local policy regulations regarding patients’ access to their psychiatric notes and describe to what extent patients currently are offered access to them. The rationale behind the study is that current policies and current practices may differ between the 21 self-governing regions, although there is a national regulation. We gathered web-based information from policy documents and regulations from each region’s website. We also conducted key stakeholder interviews with respondents from the regions and cross-regional private care providers, using a qualitative approach. The results show that 17 of 21 regions share psychiatric notes with patients, where forensic psychiatric care was the most excluded psychiatric care setting. All private care providers reported that they mainly follow the regions’ guidelines. Our findings show that regional differences concerning sharing psychiatric notes persist, despite Swedish regulations and a national policy that stipulates equal care for everyone. The differences, however, appear to have decreased over time, and we report evidence that the regions are moving toward increased transparency for psychiatry patients. 

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  • 9.
    Doroshenko, Alina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences.
    Arbetsmiljö inom hälso- och sjukvården: Arbetsmiljöfaktorer som ofta orsakar utbrändhet hos de anställda2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to analyze the factors that contribute to burnout in those who works in health care. Method: The following work consists of literature study. Analysis: Several scientific cross-sectional articles from different countries were used with the aim of investigating which work environment factors often occur and cause the burnout among physicians, nurses and assisted nurses. Result: During the result, it was reported the burnout is caused by many factors such as stressful working days, young age, lack of work experience, family status, number of children, close cooperation with many patients, little contact med colleagues, high demands and ingratitude from the patients, problems with finances, lack of rest and individual´s health problems. Using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory used in articles, fatigue syndrome was clearly defined, and its factors carefully analyzed. Discussion: In the discussion two different Burnout Inventory – surveys were described with the support of articles. In addition, the characteristics of a survey were discussed, with was supported by Bryman (2008); and articles, used in the analysis, were presented to ensure their credibility.

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  • 10.
    El Ansari, Walid
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar ; College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar ; Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    Elhag, Wahiba
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Preoperative Prediction of Body Mass Index of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes at 1 Year After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy: Cross-Sectional Study2022In: Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, ISSN 1540-4196, E-ISSN 1557-8518, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 360-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Very few models predict weight loss among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) patients after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). This retrospective study undertook such a task. Materials and Methods: We identified all patients >18 years old with T2D who underwent primary LSG at our institution and had complete data. The training set comprised 107 patients operated upon during the period April 2011 to June 2014; the validation set comprised 134 patients operated upon during the successive chronological period, July 2014 to December 2015. Sex, age, presurgery BMI, T2D duration, number of T2D medications, insulin use, hypertension, and dyslipidemia were utilized as independent predictors of 1-year BMI. We employed regression analysis, and assessed the goodness of fit and "Residuals versus Fits" plot. Paired sample t-tests compared the observed and predicted BMI at 1 year. Results: The model comprised preoperative BMI (β = 0.757, P = 0.026) + age (β = 0.142, P < 0.0001) with adjusted R2 of 0.581 (P < 0.0001), and goodness of fit showed an unbiased model with accurate prediction. The equation was: BMI value 1 year after LSG = 1.777 + 0.614 × presurgery BMI (kg/m2) +0.106 × age (years). For validation, the equation exhibited an adjusted R2 0.550 (P < 0.0001), and the goodness of fit indicated an unbiased model. The BMI predicted by the model fell within -3.78 BMI points to +2.42 points of the observed 1-year BMI. Pairwise difference between the mean 1-year observed and predicted BMI was not significant (-0.41 kg/m2, P = 0.225). Conclusions: This predictive model estimates the BMI 1 year after LSG. The model comprises preoperative BMI and age. It allows the forecast of patients' BMI after surgery, hence setting realistic expectations which are critical for patient satisfaction after bariatric surgery. An attainable target motivates the patient to achieve it.

  • 11.
    El-Menyar, Ayman
    et al.
    Trauma Surgery, Clinical Research, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical School, Doha, Qatar.
    Ibrahim, Wanis H.
    Internal Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Qatar and College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Gomaa, Mohamed
    Cardiology, Heart Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Sathian, Brijesh
    Trauma Surgery, Clinical Research, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Hssain, Ali Ait
    Internal Medicine, Intensive Care Unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Wahlen, Bianca
    Anaesthesiology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Nabir, Syed
    Radiology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Al-Thani, Hassan
    Trauma Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Characteristics and predictors of burnout among healthcare professionals: A cross-sectional study in two tertiary hospitals2021In: Postgraduate medical journal, ISSN 0032-5473, E-ISSN 1469-0756, Vol. 97, no 1151, p. 583-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The pattern and impact of burnout among the medical staff are not yet well defined. However, the consequences of burnout are not limited to the healthcare providers but also may affect their family, colleagues and patients in a negative manner. We aimed to assess the characteristics and predictors of burnout among health professionals at two large tertiary hospitals. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study during the period from July 2018 to 31 December 2018. Data, via Maslach Burnout Inventory survey, were collected from physicians and other healthcare workers in two hospitals. Results: A total of 624 responses to questionnaires were analysed. Half of the respondents were physicians, and men constituted the majority. About 10% (95% CI, 7.8 to 12.5) of the respondents satisfied the criteria of burnout. Emotional exhaustion (EE) was observed in 45.7%, depersonalisation (DP) in 26.9% and personal accomplishment (PA) in 41.2% of the respondents. There was a positive correlation between EE and DP (r=0.627, p=0.001), and a weak negative correlation between DP and PA (r=-0.195, p=0.001). Young age, less experience, trauma surgery, lack of habits and getting depressed ≥1 time/week were predictors of burnout. Conclusions: Burnout affects one-tenth of the health professionals in the tertiary hospitals in Qatar. Physicians are more likely to have higher DP and lower PA, whereas nurses prone to have higher EE. In this study, no gender discrepancy is appreciated and the junior medical staff is at a higher risk of burnout. 

  • 12.
    Elsweiler, David
    et al.
    University of Regensburg, Germany.
    Schäfer, Hanna
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Ludwig, Bernd
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Torkamaan, Helma
    University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany.
    Said, Alan
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Trattner, Christoph
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Third international workshop on health recommender systems (HealthRecSys 2018)2018In: RecSys 2018 - 12th ACM Conference on Recommender Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 517-518Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 3rd International Workshop on Health Recommender Systems was held in conjunction with the 2018 ACM Conference on Recommender Systems in Vancouver, Canada. Following the two prior workshops in 2016 [4] and 2017 [2], the focus of this workshop is to deepen the discussion on health promotion, health care as well as health related methods. This workshop also aims to strengthen the HealthRecSys community, to engage representatives of other health domains into cross-domain collaborations, and to exchange and share infrastructure. 

  • 13.
    Emmesjö, Lina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Hallgren, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Patients’ and next of kin’s expectations and experiences of a mobile integrated care model with a home health care physician – a qualitative thematic study2023In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The organizational principle of remaining at home has offset care from the hospital to the home of the older person where care from formal and informal caregivers is needed. Globally, formal care is often organized to handle singular and sporadic health problems, leading to the need for several health care providers. The need for an integrated care model was therefore recognized by health care authorities in one county in Sweden, who created a cross-organisational integrated care model to meet these challenges. The Mobile integrated care model with a home health care physician (MICM) is a collaboration between regional and municipal health care. Descriptions of patients’ and next of kin’s experiences of integrated care is however lacking, motivating exploration.

    Method

    A qualitative thematic study. Data collection was done before the patients met the MICM physician, and again six months later.

    Results

    The participants expected a sense of relief when admitted to MICM, and hoped for shared responsibility, building a personal contact and continuity but experienced lack of information about what MICM was. At the follow-up interview, participants described having an easier daily life. The increased access to the health care personnel (HCP) allowed participants to let go of responsibility, and created a sense of safety through the personalised contact and continuity. However, some felt ignored and that the personnel teamed up against the patient. The MICM structure was experienced as hierarchical, which influenced the possibility to participate. However, the home visits opened up the possibility for shared decision making.

    Conclusion

    Participants had an expectation of receiving safe and coherent health care, to share responsibility, personal contact and continuity. After six months, the participants expressed that MICM had provided an easier daily life. The direct access to HCP reduced their responsibility and they had created a personalised contact with the HCP and that the individual HCP mattered to them, which could be perceived as in line with the goals in the shift to local health care. The MICM was experienced as a hierarchic structure with impact on participation, indicating that all dimensions of person-centred care were not fulfilled.

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  • 14.
    Emmesjö, Lina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
    Home health care professionals’ experiences of working in integrated teams during the COVID-19 pandemic: a qualitative thematic study2022In: BMC Primary Care, E-ISSN 2731-4553, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Since COVID-19 emerged, over 514 million COVID-19 cases and 6 million COVID-19-related deaths have been reported worldwide. Older persons receiving home health care often have co-morbidities that require advanced medical care, and are at risk of becoming severely ill or dying from COVID-19. In Sweden, over 10,000 COVID-19-related deaths have been reported among persons receiving municipal home health and social care. Home health care professionals have been working with the patients most at risk if infected. Most research has focused on the experiences of professionals in hospitals and assistant nurses in a home care setting. It is therefore valuable to study the experiences of the registered nurses and physicians working in home health care during the COVID-19 pandemic to learn lessons to inform future work.

    Method

    A thematic qualitative study design using a semi-structured interview guide.

    Results

    The health care professionals experienced being forced into changed ways of working, which disrupted building and maintaining relationships with other health care professionals, and interrupted home health care. The health care professionals described being forced into digital and phone communication instead of in-person meetings, which negatively influenced the quality of care. The COVID-19 pandemic brought worry about illness for the health care professionals, including worrying about infecting patients, co-workers, and themselves, as well as worry about upholding the provision of health care because of increasing sick leave. The health care professionals felt powerless in the face of their patients’ declining health. They also faced worry and guilt from the patients’ next of kin.

    Conclusion

    Home health care professionals have faced the COVID-19 pandemic while working across organizational borders, caring for older patients who have been isolated during the pandemic and trying to prevent declining health and feelings of isolation. Due to the forced use of digital and phone communication instead of in-person visits, the home health care professionals experienced a reduction in the patients’ quality of care and difficulty maintaining good communication between the professions.

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  • 15.
    Ferati, Mexhid
    et al.
    Department of Informatics, Linnaeus University, Växjö & Kalmar, Sweden.
    Bertoni, Marco
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Dalipi, Fisnik
    Department of Informatics, Linnaeus University, Växjö & Kalmar, Sweden.
    Kurti, Arianit
    Department of Informatics, Linnaeus University, Växjö & Kalmar, Sweden.
    Jokela, Päivi
    Department of Informatics, Linnaeus University, Växjö & Kalmar, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Department of Informatics, Linnaeus University, Växjö & Kalmar, Sweden.
    Tackling the Sustainability of Digital Aging Innovations Through Design Thinking and Systems Thinking Perspectives2021In: ICT for Health, Accessibility and Wellbeing: First International Conference, IHAW 2021, Larnaca, Cyprus, November 8–9, 2021, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Edwige Pissaloux; George Angelos Papadopoulos; Achilleas Achilleos; Ramiro Velázquez, Cham: Springer, 2021, p. 179-184, article id 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digitalization of society brings many opportunities and challenges, especially on how we organize the welfare society in the future. This becomes especially pertinent as we are heading toward a global increase of older people, which will strain healthcare and bring the challenge of building sustainable solutions. In this paper, we argue that the unsustainable solutions within healthcare are due to them being defined and ‘solved’ with a single approach or approaches used in silos. We advocate that a more sustainable solution could be achieved by combining systems thinking and design thinking perspectives throughout the entire process—from problem definition to solution offering. A benefit of such combined perspectives is the ability to develop a shared context among all stakeholders, which helps uncover unique tacit knowledge from their experience. This will serve as a solid foundation to generate unconventional ideas that will lead to sustainable and satisfactory solutions. 

  • 16.
    Furåker, Carina
    et al.
    Göteborg University.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Walldal, Elvi
    Göteborg University.
    Quality of care in relation to a critical pathway from the staff's perspective2004In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 309-316Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Gadolin, Christian
    et al.
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden / Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Erik
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellström, Andreas
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Providing healthcare through “value shops”: impact on professional fulfilment for physicians and nurses2020In: International Journal of Health Governance, ISSN 2059-4631, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore and demonstrate the ability of healthcare professionals to attain professional fulfilment when providing healthcare inspired by “value shops”. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative case study incorporating interviews and observations was conducted. Findings: The empirical data suggest that the professional fulfilment of both physicians and nurses is facilitated when care is organized through “value shops”. Both groups of professionals state that they are able to return to their “professional core”. Originality/value: The beneficial outcomes of organizing healthcare inspired by the “value shop” have previously been explored in terms of efficiency and quality. However, the professional fulfilment of healthcare professionals when providing such care has not been explicitly addressed. Professional fulfilment is vital in order to safeguard high-quality care, as well as healthcare professionals' involvement and engagement in implementing quality improvements. This paper highlights the fact that care provision inspired by the “value shop” may facilitate professional fulfilment, which further strengthens the potential positive outcomes of the “value shop” when utilized in a healthcare setting. 

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  • 18.
    Ghani, Zartashia
    et al.
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Jarl, Johan
    Health Economics Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Andersson, Martin
    Department of Industrial Economics, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    The Cost-Effectiveness of Mobile Health (mHealth) Interventions for Older Adults: Systematic Review2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 15, article id 5290Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to critically assess and review empirical evidence on the cost-effectiveness of Mobile Health (mHealth) interventions for older adults. We systematically searched databases such as Pubmed, Scopus, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Literature (CINAHL) for peer-reviewed economic evaluations published in English from 2007 to 2018. We extracted data on methods and empirical evidence (costs, effects, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio) and assessed if this evidence supported the reported findings in terms of cost-effectiveness. The consolidated health economic evaluation reporting standards (CHEERS) checklist was used to assess the reporting quality of the included studies. Eleven studies were identified and categorized into two groups: complex smartphone communication and simple text-based communication. Substantial heterogeneity among the studies in terms of methodological approaches and types of intervention was observed. The cost-effectiveness of complex smartphone communication interventions cannot be judged due to lack of information. Limited evidence of cost-effectiveness was found for interventions related to simple text-based communications. Comprehensive economic evaluation studies are warranted to assess the cost-effectiveness of mHealth interventions designed for older adults.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 19.
    Ghani, Zartashia
    et al.
    Applied Health Technology, Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Saha, Sanjib
    Health Economics Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Malmö), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jarl, Johan
    Health Economics Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Malmö), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, Martin
    Department of Industrial Economics, Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan Sanmartin
    Applied Health Technology, Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Applied Health Technology, Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Short Term Economic Evaluation of the Digital Platform "Support, Monitoring and Reminder Technology for Mild Dementia" (SMART4MD) for People with Mild Cognitive Impairment and their Informal Caregivers2022In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 1629-1641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A randomized controlled trial of the SMART4MD tablet application was conducted for persons with mild cognitive impairment (PwMCI) and their informal caregivers to improve or maintain quality of life.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to conduct economic evaluation of SMART4MD compared to standard care in Sweden from a healthcare provider perspective based on a 6-month follow-up period.

    METHODS: Three hundred forty-five dyads were enrolled: 173 dyads in the intervention group and 172 in standard care. The primary outcome measures for PwMCI and informal caregivers were quality-adjusted life years (QALY). The results are presented as incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, and confidence intervals are calculated using non-parametric bootstrap procedure.

    RESULTS: For PwMCI, the mean difference in total costs between intervention and standard care was € 12 (95% CI: -2090 to 2115) (US$ = € 1.19) and the mean QALY change was -0.004 (95% CI: -0.009 to 0.002). For informal caregivers, the cost difference was - € 539 (95% CI: -2624 to 1545) and 0.003 (95% CI: -0.002 to 0.008) for QALY. The difference in cost and QALY for PwMCI and informal caregivers combined was -€ 527 (95% CI: -3621 to 2568) and -0.001 (95% CI: -0.008 to 0.006). Although generally insignificant differences, this indicates that SMART4MD, compared to standard care was: 1) more costly and less effective for PwMCI, 2) less costly and more effective for informal caregivers, and 3) less costly and less effective for PwMCI and informal caregivers combined.

    CONCLUSION: The cost-effectiveness of SMART4MD over 6 months is inconclusive, although the intervention might be more beneficial for informal caregivers than PwMCI.

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  • 20.
    Gharibi, Farid
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Moshiri, Esmaeil
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Tavani, Masoumeh Ebrahimi
    Academic Research Staff, Quality Improvement, Monitoring and Evaluation Department, Center of Health Network Management, Deputy of Public Health, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. Division of Public Health Science, Department of health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Challenges of Implementing an Effective Primary Health Care Accreditation Program: a qualitative study in Iran2023In: BMC Primary Care, ISSN 2731-4553, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Accreditation is a prerequisite for scientific management of the health system, owing to its numerous benefits on health centres’ performance. The current study examined Iran’s primary healthcare accreditation program to ascertain the challenges to its successful implementation. Methods: This qualitative study examined the perspectives of 32 managers and staff members in the pilot accreditation program (from the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, and Aradan District Health Network). Three in-depth group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire, and the data obtained were assessed using thematic analysis. As a result of this investigation identified six themes, 29 sub-themes, and 218 codes as challenges to the successful accreditation of primary health care in Iran. Results: Six main themes, including “organisational culture”, “motivational mechanisms”, “staff workload”, “training system”, “information systems”, and “macro-executive infrastructure”, were identified as the main domain of challenges, with seven, five, two, four, three, and eight sub-themes respectively. Conclusion: Accreditation of PHC in Iran faces significant challenges and obstacles that, if ignored, can jeopardise the program’s success and effectiveness. By identifying challenges and obstacles and making practical suggestions for overcoming them, the findings of this study can aid in the program’s successful implementation and achievement of desired outcomes. 

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  • 21.
    Goienetxea Uriarte, Ainhoa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Ruiz Zúñiga, Enrique
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Urenda Moris, Matías
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Ng, Amos H. C.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    How can decision makers be supported in the improvement of an emergency department?: A simulation, optimization and data mining approach2017In: Operations Research for Health Care, ISSN 2211-6923, E-ISSN 2211-6931, Vol. 15, p. 102-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The improvement of emergency department processes involves the need to take into considerationmultiple variables and objectives in a highly dynamic and unpredictable environment, which makes thedecision-making task extremely challenging. The use of different methodologies and tools to support thedecision-making process is therefore a key issue. This article presents a novel approach in healthcarein which Discrete Event Simulation, Simulation-Based Multi-Objective Optimization and Data Miningtechniques are used in combination. This methodology has been applied for a system improvementanalysis in a Swedish emergency department. As a result of the project, the decision makers were providedwith a range of nearly optimal solutions and design rules which reduce considerably the length of stayand waiting times for emergency department patients. These solutions include the optimal number ofresources and the required level of improvement in key processes. The article presents and discussesthe benefits achieved by applying this methodology, which has proven to be remarkably valuable fordecision-making support, with regard to complex healthcare system design and improvement.

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    Goienetxea et al. 2017
  • 22.
    Hagström, Josefin
    et al.
    Dept. of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Blease, Charlotte
    Dept. of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Moll, Jonas
    Informatics, School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Informatics, School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Maria
    Dept. of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Adolescents' and Young Adults' Experiences of Offense from Reading Their Health Records Online2024In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 310, p. 1422-1423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients feeling offended by reading records online is a concern among healthcare professionals, however previously published work has focused on adult patients. Here, a survey was used to explore and compare experiences of offense among adolescents (15-19 years old) and young adults (20-24 years old). Findings indicated that while the ratio of those offended did not differ between adolescents and young adults, reasons for feeling offended did.

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  • 23.
    Hajismail, Tasnim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Orrenvade, Alva
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Sjuksköterskors upplevelser av aggressivitet, hot och våld på akutvårdsmottagningar: En litteraturöversikt2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 12 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aggressiveness, threats and violence in health care is a problem that is increasing in Sweden and all over the world. Nurses who works close to patients have a higher risk of becoming vulnerable, especially in emergency care, because it is one of the most vulnerable activities in healthcare. Being exposed to threats and violence creates insecurity in the nurse's work life and can have consequences for patient safety. Purpose: To illuminate nurses' experiences of aggressiveness, threats and violence in emergency care clinics. Method: A literature study with qualitative method in which eleven scientific articles were examined. Result: The result shows that nurses experience fear and insecurity in their work as a result of previously experienced aggression, threats and violence. A sense of loneliness in the encounter with the problem is also experienced because the work management is not there as support. The nurses consider themselves to be the cause of these behaviors and it causes a feeling of frustration and powerlessness. These experiences result in a majority of the nurses in a normalization of the problem. Conclusion: The study shows that nurses' experiences of aggression, threats and violence affect their workpractices and result in an influenced caring. Thus it should be paid more attention to avoiding its consequences, both at the individual level and at the organizational level.

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  • 24.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Bergman, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Klingberg, Maria
    Collaborative Health Care, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, United States.
    Implementing a person centred collaborative health care model: A qualitative study on patient experiences2021In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 59, article id 101068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Collaborative Health Care (CHC) is a unique model in which ambulance services, home health care, hospital care and the national telephone helpline for healthcare in Sweden – Swedish health care direct (SHD1177) collaborate to provide the fastest possible health care for inhabitants living in eleven municipalities in western region of Sweden. Aim: To explore how patients experience and perceive health care received in the CHC. Method: Qualitative descriptive study using open-ended individual telephone interviews with fifteen community dwelling persons with experiences of care throughthe model CHC were conducted. Results: Two main categories and six subcategories were identified. The category “Thoughts of time in regard to acute health care” include “CHC leads to shorter waiting time for health care”, “Knowledge about the staff working hours” and “To alert or not alert”. The category “Thoughts on unplanned health care from CHC” involved “Receiving health care in my home”, ”Coordination from SHD1177 surprises” and “Accessibility of health care values higher than continuity”. Conclusion: Integrated health care models such as CHC are time saving and highly appreciated by community dwelling persons. The benefits of provision of coherent health care like in CHC, addresses the need to implement innovative integrated healthcare models in today's health care. 

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  • 25.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden ; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Josephson, Iréne
    Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden ; The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    In Hospital We Trust: Experiences of older peoples' decision to seek hospital care2015In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 306-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore how older people experience and perceive decisions to seek hospital care while receiving home health care. Twenty-two Swedish older persons were interviewed about their experiences of decision to seek hospital while receiving home health care. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The findings consist of one interpretative theme describing an overall confidence in hospital staff to deliver both medical and psychosocial health care, In Hospital We Trust, with three underlying categories: Superior Health Care, People's Worries, and Biomedical Needs. Findings indicate a need for establishing confidence and ensuring sufficient qualifications, both medical and psychological, in home health care staff to meet the needs of older people. Understanding older peoples' arguments for seeking hospital care may have implications for how home care staff address individuals' perceived needs. Fulfillment of perceived health needs may reduce avoidable hospitalizations and consequently improve quality of life.

  • 26.
    Hallner, Linus
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Establishing a biopsychosocial model for conspiracy theory ideation2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to provide the grounds for a biopsychosocial understanding of the underpinnings of conspiracy theorist ideation by studying research articles from different scientific disciplines. Cross-disciplinary concurring results are presented and discussed, as well as some examples of how conspiracy theories have been used during the 20th century. Also discussed is how this is used in political discourse in the populist climate of today, with the rise of radical right-wing movements, the justification of “alternative facts” from higher governmental ranks, and religious fundamentalism, making it a societal issue of possible big magnitude. Neurological similarities was found between religiousness and proneness to conspiracy theory ideation, and the articles concerning neural correlates therefore stem from research on religious individuals due to the lack of neuro-biopsychological research on actual conspiracy theorists. Since conspiracy theory ideation has shown the ability to cause negative consequences it is also advised that governmental agencies and society as a whole revise its stance on populism and the spread of flawed information, in order to maintain an open society. Also presented are a few ideas on how to begin countering the rise of populism.

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    Backstrom, Linus - 2018 - ESTABLISHING A BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL MODEL FOR CONSPIRACY THEORY IDEATION
  • 27.
    Hammad, Yassert A.
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Shallik, Nabil A.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    Bali, Souad
    Department of Anesthesiology, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Feki, Abdellatif M.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Quality, safety and efficiency in practice: Risk assessment and standardisation of anesthesia equipment and supplies in operating theaters of high-volume tertiary-care academic medical center2019In: Middle East Journal of Anesthesiology, ISSN 0544-0440, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Operating theatres (OTs) are valuable and costly resources that need to be appropriately designed and stocked for efficient, quality and safe patient care. We assessed the logistic inefficiency including the availability and location layout of necessary supplies across OTs of a high-volume tertiary-care academic medical center. Methods: A blinded observer (anesthesia technologist) was allocated to 10 OTs. For each OT, the availability, quantity and time spent to locate and obtain a set of required items were recorded (baseline values). We then developed an OT mapping plan to determine the specific item/s to be stocked in specific locations, and one OT was standardized to this configuration map. A blinded observer was then allocated to this standardized OT and time spent to obtain the same set of items was again recorded. Six of our regular OTs were then standardized to the same configuration, and the time to obtain the items by a blinded observer were again recorded for each OT. T tests compared the time required to locate items in the standardized OT vs. regular OTs; paired t tests compared the time required in each OT vs. itself before and after standardization. Results: The observer required significantly more time in each of the 10 regular OTs compared to the standardized OT. The time spent by the observer to obtain the required items significantly and considerably decreased in each of 6 OTs after their standardization, compared to the time required before their standardization. Conclusion: This quality improvement project successfully reduced the time required to identify and locate different supplies, which impacts on the efficiency and quality of patient care. For anesthesia staff moving from one anesthetizing location to another within the institution, consistencies in location and number of anesthesia equipment and supplies create higher levels of safety and professionalism.

  • 28.
    Hovlin, Lina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden ; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Mutual trust is a prerequisite for nurses’ sense of safety and work satisfaction – Mobile Integrated Care Model: A qualitative interview study2023In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of older persons have complex health care needs. This, along with the organizational principle of remaining at home, emphasizes the need to develop collaborations among organizations caring for older persons. A health care model developed in Sweden, the Mobile Integrated Care Model aims to promote work in teams across organizations. The aim of the study was to describe nurses’ experiences in working and providing health care in the Mobile Integrated Care Model in the home with home health care physicians. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 nurses and analyzed through qualitative content analysis. The method was compliant with the COREQ checklist. A mutually trusting collaboration with physicians, which formed person-centered care, created work satisfaction for the nurses. Working within the Mobile Integrated Care Model was negatively impacted by being employed by different organizations, lack of time to provide health care, and physicians’ person-centered work abilities.

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  • 29.
    Hovlin, Lina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden ; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
    The role of the home health care physician in mobile integrated care: a qualitative phenomenograpic study2022In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An increasing older population, along with the organizational principle of remaining at home, has moved health care from institutions into the older person’s home, where several health care providers facilitate care. The Mobile Integrated Care Model strives to provide cost-efficient, coherent, person-centered health care in the home. In the integrated care team, where the home health care physician is the medical authority, several health care professions work across organizational borders. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe Home Health Care Physicians perceptions of working and providing health care in the Mobile Integrated Care Model, as well as perceptions of participating in and forming health care.

    Methods: A phenomenographic qualitative study design, with semi-structured interviews using an interview guide.

    Results: Working within Mobile Integrated Care Model was a different way of working as a physician. The physicians’ role was to support the patient by making safe medical decisions. Physicians described themselves as a piece in the team puzzle, where the professional knowledge of others was crucial to give quality health care. Being in the patients’ homes was expressed as adding a unique dimension in the provision of health care, and the physicians learned more about the patients by meeting them in their homes than at an institution. This aided the physicians in respecting patient autonomy in medical decision making, even though the physicians sometimes disregarded patient autonomy in favor of their own medical experience. There was a divided view on next of kin participation among the home health care physicians, ranging from always including to total absence of involving next of kin in decision making.

    Conclusions: The home health care physicians described the Mobile Integrated Care Model as the best way to work, but there was still a need for additional resources and structure when working in different organizations. The need for full-time employment, additional time or hours, more equipment, access to each other’s medical records, and additional collaboration with other health care providers were expressed, which could contribute to increased work satisfaction and facilitate further development of person-centered care in the Mobile Integrated Care Model. 

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  • 30.
    Hult, Marja
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Kallio, Hanna
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland.
    Halminen, Olli
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Linna, Miika
    Department of Health and Social Management, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland ; Research Services, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Kangasniemi, Mari
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland.
    Cost-effectiveness calculators on health and social services planning and evaluation: an explorative interview study of key informants2022In: International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, ISSN 1463-5240, E-ISSN 2164-9545, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the views of key experts on developing and using cost-effectiveness calculators to plan and evaluate health and wellbeing promotion interventions in health and social services. Data for this qualitative interview study were collected from 14 Finnish experts in health and wellbeing coordination, health and social service management and research and health economics in spring 2021. A semi-structured interview method with thematic analysis was used. The experts said that there is a need for cost-effectiveness evaluation tools that support local evidence-based decision-making. This would enable organizations to plan and allocate scarce resources for interventions that promote equitable and effective health and wellbeing. However, practical tools and calculators that enable users to make decisions based on the best available evidence are not widely used. Local decision-makers, researchers and service providers all need to be involved in agreeing goals and selecting the right target groups and measures. They also need to make decisions about the best available data sources and how to use calculators to define and evaluate outcomes. Cost-effectiveness calculators are needed for local evidence-based decision-making, so that municipalities can allocate scarce resources to effective services that increase the wellbeing and equality of residents. This requires key stakeholders to work together to plan, develop and evaluate comprehensive, easy-to-use cost-effectiveness calculators.

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  • 31.
    Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept ALM, Informat Studies, Sweden.
    Moll, Jonas
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat Technol, Sweden.
    Enwald, Heidi
    Univ Oulu, Informat Studies, Finland.
    Hirvonen, Noora
    Univ Oulu, Informat Studies, Finland.
    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat Technol, Human Comp Interact, Sweden.
    Age-related differences in seeking clarification to understand medical record information2019In: Information research, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 24, no 1, article id isic1834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Patient accessible electronic health records can be used to inform and empower patients. However, their use may require complementary information seeking since they can be difficult to interpret. So far, relatively little is known of the information seeking that takes place in connection to health record use, and especially the way it varies in different age groups. A better understanding of patients' preferences of where and how to find explanatory information provides valuable input for the development of health information provision and counselling services. Method. The analysis is based on the results of a national survey of Swedish individuals (N=1,411) who had used a national patient accessible electronic health record system (Journalen). Analysis. The data were analysed in SPSS 24.0 using Kruskal-Wallis tests for detecting groupwise differences and Jonckheere-Terpstra tests for discovering age-related trends in the data. Findings. Older patients were more likely to use a telephone and younger patients to use socia l contacts to ask for clarification. Generally, older adults born between 1946-1960 appear as passive information seekers. Conclusion. Age gro ups differ in their preferences on how to seek clarification, which underlines the importance of a better understanding of individual differences in delivering not only technically but also intellectually accessible health information. Calling by telephone could be a habit of present older generations whereas, to a degree, searching information online could be a comparable habit of current younger generations.

  • 32.
    Hägglund, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Kane, Bridget
    Information Systems, Karlstad University Business School, Sweden.
    Editorial: Personalized Digital Health and Patient-Centric Services2022In: Frontiers in Computer Science, E-ISSN 2624-9898, Vol. 4, article id 862358Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 33.
    Hägglund, Maria
    et al.
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; Medtech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kharko, Anna
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; Medtech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden ; School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, University of Plymouth, United Kingdom.
    Hagström, Josefin
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; Medtech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden .
    Bärkås, Annika
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; Medtech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Blease, Charlotte
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; Medtech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden ; Department of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    DesRoches, Catherine
    Department of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    Fagerlund, Asbjørn Johansen
    Norwegian Centre for E-Health Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Haage, Barbara
    E-Medicine Centre, Department of Health Technologies, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Huvila, Isto
    Department of Archives, Libraries & Museums, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hörhammer, Iiris
    Department of Computer Science, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Kane, Bridget
    Business School, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Klein, Gunnar O.
    Centre for Empirical Research on Information Systems, School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kristiansen, Eli
    Norwegian Centre for E-Health Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Luks, Kerli
    E-Medicine Centre, Department of Health Technologies, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Moll, Jonas
    Centre for Empirical Research on Information Systems, School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Muli, Irene
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; Medtech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Raphaug, Eline Hovstad
    Norwegian Centre for E-Health Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Riggare, Sara
    Participatory eHealth and Health Data Research Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden ; Medtech Science & Innovation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ross, Peeter
    E-Medicine Centre, Department of Health Technologies, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Centre for Empirical Research on Information Systems, School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Simola, Saija
    Department of Computer Science, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Soone, Hedvig
    E-Medicine Centre, Department of Health Technologies, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Wang, Bo
    Norwegian Centre for E-Health Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Ghorbanian Zolbin, Maedeh
    Department of Computer Science, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Kujala, Sari
    Department of Computer Science, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Johansen, Monika Alise
    Norwegian Centre for E-Health Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway ; Department of Clinical Medicine, Telemedicine and E-health Research Group, Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    The NORDeHEALTH 2022 Patient Survey: Cross-Sectional Study of National Patient Portal Users in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Estonia2023In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 25, article id e47573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although many surveys have been conducted on patients accessing their own health records in recent years, there is a limited amount of nationwide cross-country data available on patients' views and preferences. To address this gap, an international survey of patient users was conducted in the Nordic eHealth project, NORDeHEALTH. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the sociodemographic characteristics and experiences of patients who accessed their electronic health records (EHRs) through national patient portals in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Estonia. METHODS: A cross-sectional web-based survey was distributed using the national online health portals. The target participants were patients who accessed the national patient portals at the start of 2022 and who were aged ≥15 years. The survey included a mixture of close-ended and free-text questions about participant sociodemographics, usability experience, experiences with health care and the EHR, reasons for reading health records online, experience with errors, omissions and offense, opinions about security and privacy, and the usefulness of portal functions. In this paper, we summarized the data on participant demographics, past experience with health care, and the patient portal through descriptive statistics. RESULTS: In total, 29,334 users completed the survey, of which 9503 (32.40%) were from Norway, 13,008 (44.35%) from Sweden, 4713 (16.07%) from Finland, and 2104 (7.17%) from Estonia. National samples were comparable according to reported gender, with about two-thirds identifying as women (19,904/29,302, 67.93%). Age distributions were similar across the countries, but Finland had older users while Estonia had younger users. The highest attained education and presence of health care education varied among the national samples. In all 4 countries, patients most commonly rated their health as "fair" (11,279/29,302, 38.48%). In Estonia, participants were more often inclined to rate their health positively, whereas Norway and Sweden had the highest proportion of negative health ratings. Across the whole sample, most patients received some care in the last 2 years (25,318/29,254, 86.55%). Mental health care was more common (6214/29,254, 21.24%) than oncological care (3664/29,254, 12.52%). Overall, most patients had accessed their health record "2 to 9 times" (11,546/29,306, 39.4%), with the most frequent users residing in Sweden, where about one-third of patients accessed it "more than 20 times" (4571/13,008, 35.14%). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first large-scale international survey to compare patient users' sociodemographics and experiences with accessing their EHRs. Although the countries are in close geographic proximity and demonstrate similar advancements in giving their residents online records access, patient users in this survey differed. We will continue to investigate patients' experiences and opinions about national patient-accessible EHRs through focused analyses of the national and combined data sets from the NORDeHEALTH 2022 Patient Survey. 

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  • 34.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    Reykjavik University, Department of Computer Science, Iceland.
    Vallo Hult, Helena
    University West, Sweden ; NU Hospital Group, Sweden.
    Johansson, Victoria
    University West, Sweden.
    Angenete, Eva
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Invisible Work Meets Visible Work: Infrastructuring from the Perspective of Patients and Healthcare Professionals2021In: Proceedings of the 54th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences , 2021, p. 3556-3565Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased patient engagement and the use of new types of data, such as patient-generated health data (PGHD) is shifting how work is performed in relation to healthcare. This change enables healthcare professionals to delegate parts of work previously conducted by them to patients. There is a consensus regarding the need for nurses and physicians to work seamlessly together to make healthcare flow, but the role and responsibility of patients are less researched. In this paper, we aim to fill that gap by focusing on the shift of work from healthcare professionals to patients from the perspective of i) patients and ii) healthcare professionals. We use infrastructuring as a lens to understand the design of everyday work and actions from both perspectives. The main contribution is an analysis of, and insights into, how the work of patients can support healthcare professionals along with a conceptualization of how infrastructuring processes within and outside of healthcare are interconnected.

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  • 35.
    Johansson, Linda
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, Aging Research Network – Jönköping(ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Institute of Gerontology, Aging Research Network – Jönköping(ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden / Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, United States.
    Lannering, Christina
    Region Jönköping County, Futurum, Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Institute of Gerontology, Aging Research Network – Jönköping(ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden / Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Region Jönköping County, Futurum, Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden / Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Institute of Gerontology, Aging Research Network – Jönköping(ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health and Welfare, Centre for Oral Health and Aging Research Network – Jönköping (ARN-J), Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bravell, Marie E.
    Institute of Gerontology, Aging Research Network – Jönköping(ARN-J), School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Using aggregated data from Swedish national quality registries as tools to describe health conditions of older adults with complex needs2021In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 1297-1306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Combining National Quality Registries (NQRs) with existing National Health Registries (NHRs) might make it possible to get a wider picture of older adults health situation. The aim was to examine the feasibility of aggregating data across different NQRs and existing NHRs to explore the possibility to investigate trajectories and patterns of disease and care, specifically for the most ill older adults. Method: A Swedish twin population (N = 44,816) was linked to nine NQRs and four NHRs. A descriptive mixed-method study was performed. A manifest content analysis identified which health parameters were collected from each NQR. Factor analysis identified patterns in representation across NQRs. Two case studies illustrated individual trajectories of care by using NQRs and NHRs. Results: About 36% of the population was registered in one or more NQRs. NQRs included 1849 variables that were sorted into 13 categories with extensive overlap across the NQRs. Health and function variables were identified, but few social or cognitive variables. Even though most individuals demonstrated unique patterns of multi-morbidities, factor analysis identified three clusters of representation in the NQRs with sufficient sample sizes for future investigations. The two cases illustrated the possibility of following patterns of disease and trajectories of care. Conclusions: NQRs seem to be a significant source for collecting data about a population that may be underrepresented in most research on aging because of their age and poor health. However, NQRs are primarily disease related, and further development of the registries to maximize coverage and utility is needed. 

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  • 36.
    Larsson, Lena G.
    et al.
    Närhälsan Kungshamn Health Centre, Region Västra Götaland, Kungshamn, Sweden ; Academy of Sahlgrenska, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden ; Närhälsan Research and Development Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Fyrbodal, Sweden.
    Bäck-Pettersson, Siv
    Närhälsan Research and Development Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Fyrbodal, Sweden.
    Kylén, Sven
    Närhälsan Research and Development Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Fyrbodal, Sweden ; Centre on Health Care Improvement and Innovation, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Academy of Sahlgrenska, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden ; Närhälsan Research and Development Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Fyrbodal, Sweden.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Carlström, Eric
    Academy of Sahlgrenska, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden ; Academy of Sahlgrenska, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden ; University of South East Norway, Notodden, Norway.
    A national study on collaboration in care planning for patients with complex needs2019In: International Journal of Health Planning and Management, ISSN 0749-6753, E-ISSN 1099-1751, Vol. 34, no 1, p. e646-e660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to investigate inter-organisational collaboration on care planning for patients with complex care needs. Internationally, and in Sweden where the data for this study was collected, difficulties in care planning and transition of patients between the main health care providers, hospitals, municipal care, and primary care are well known.

    METHOD: A survey of a total population of care managers in hospitals, municipalities, and primary care in Sweden was conducted. The study assessed accessibility, willingness, trustworthiness, and collaboration between health care providers. Data were analysed with descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate regressions.

    RESULTS: The results indicate that Swedish health care providers show strong self-awareness, but they describe each other's ability to collaborate as weak. Primary care stands out, displaying the highest discrepancy between self-awareness and displayed accessibility, willingness, trustworthiness, and collaboration.

    CONCLUSION: Inability to collaborate in patient care planning may be due to shortcomings in terms of trust between caregivers in the health care organisation at a national level. Organisations that experience difficulties in collaboration tend to defend themselves with arguments about their own excellence and insufficiency of others.

  • 37.
    Lautamatti, Emmi
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Finland ; The Wellbeing Services County of Pirkanmaa, Tampere, Finland.
    Mattila, Kari J.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland ; The Wellbeing Services County of Southwest Finland, Research Centre, Turku, Finland.
    Sillanmäki, Lauri
    The Wellbeing Services County of Southwest Finland, Research Centre, Turku, Finland ; University of Turku, Finland ; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Sumanen, Markku
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Finland.
    A named General Practitioner (GP) is associated with an increase of hospital days in a single predictor analysis: a follow-up of 15 years2023In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Continuity of care constitutes the basis of primary health care services and is associated with decreased hospitalization. In Finland, accessibility to primary care and increased use of hospital services are recognized challenges for the health care system. Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine whether having a named GP is associated with hospital service use. Methods: The data are part of the Health and Social Support study (HeSSup) based on a random Finnish working-age population sample. The cohort of the study comprised participants of postal surveys in 1998 (n = 25,898) who returned follow-up questionnaires both in 2003 and 2012 (n = 11,924). Background characteristics were inquired in the questionnaires, and hospitalization was derived from national registries (Hilmo-register). Results: A named GP was reported both in 2003 and 2012 only by 34.3% of the participants. The association between hospital days and a named GP was linearly rising and statistically significant in a single predictor model. The strongest associations with hospital use were with health-related factors, and the association with a named GP was no longer significant in multinomial analysis. Conclusion: A named GP is associated with an increased use of hospital days, but in a multinomial analysis the association disappeared. Health related factors showed the strongest association with hospital days. From the perspective of the on-going Finnish health and social services reform, continuity of care should be emphasized. 

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  • 38.
    Lautamatti, Emmi
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Finland ; Centre for General Practice, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Mattila, Kari
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Public Health and Clinical Research Centre, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Sillanmäki, Lauri
    Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Finland ; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Sumanen, Markku
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Finland.
    A named GP increases self-reported access to health care services2022In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 1262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Continuity of care strengthens health promotion and decreases mortality, although the mechanisms of these effects are still unclear. In recent decades, continuity of care and accessibility of health care services have both decreased in Finland. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate whether a named and assigned GP representing continuity of care is associated with the use of primary and hospital health care services and to create knowledge on the state of continuity of care in a changing health care system in Finland. Methods: The data are part of the Health and Social Support (HeSSup) mail survey based on a random Finnish working age population sample of 64,797 individuals drawn in 1998 and follow-up surveys in 2003 and 2012. The response rate in 1998 was 40% (n = 25,898). Continuity of care was derived from the 2003 and 2012 data sets, other variables from the 2012 survey (n = 11,924). The principal outcome variables were primary health care and hospital service use reported by participants. The association of the explanatory variables (gender, age, education, reported chronic diseases, health status, smoking, obesity, NYHA class of any functional limitation, depressive mood and continuity of care) with the outcome variables was analysed by binomial logistic regression analysis. Results: A named and assigned GP was independently and significantly associated with more frequent use of primary and hospital care in the adjusted logistic regression analysis (ORs 1.53 (95% CI 1.35–1.72) and 1.19 (95% CI 1.08–1.32), p < 0.001). Conclusion: A named GPs is associated with an increased use of primary care and hospital services. A named GP assures access to health care services especially to the chronically ill population. The results depict the state of continuity of care in Finland. All benefits of continuity of care are not enabled although it still assures treatment of population in the most vulnerable position. 

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  • 39.
    Lee, Nigel
    et al.
    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland, Australia / Mater Research Institute UQ, Queensland, Australia.
    Jomeen, Julie
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Hull, Cottingham, United Kingdom.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Emery, Vanessa
    Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford Royal Infirmary, United Kingdom.
    Kildea, Sue
    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University St Lucia, Australia / Mater Research Institute UQ, Aubigny Place, South Brisbane, Australia / Mater Mothers’ Hospital, Mater Health Services, Australia.
    Knowledge and use of sterile water injections amongst midwives in the United Kingdom: A cross-sectional study2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 68, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of sterile water injections (SWI) for the relief of pain in labour is popular amongst midwives in countries such as Sweden and Australia. Anecdotal reports suggest the procedure is used less commonly in the United Kingdom (UK) and that a number of barriers to introducing the practice may exist. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the awareness and use of SWI amongst midwives in the UK. Design: A cross-sectional study using an internet-based questionnaire. Participants: Midwives with Nursing and Midwifery Council Registration and currently practicing. Setting: The questionnaire was distributed via the Royal College of Midwives Facebook page and Twitter account. Invitations to participate were also sent to Heads of Midwifery to distribute to staff. Findings: Three hundred and ninety-eight midwives completed the survey. Eighty-two percent of midwives did not use SWI in practice although 69% would consider learning the procedure. There was considerable variation in techniques amongst midwives that did provide SWI. The lack of available practice guidelines and the advice from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to not use SWI were cited as the main barriers. Key conclusions: SWI use is uncommon in the UK although midwives are interested in incorporating the procedure into practice. Implications for practice: National guidance on SWI and the lack of information and training is restricting the use of the procedure in practice, despite SWI being widely used in other countries and being effective in the treatment of pain in labour.

  • 40.
    Linneusson, Gary
    et al.
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Goienetxea Uriarte, Ainhoa
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, Virtual Engineering Research Environment.
    Analyzing closer care strategies for elderly patients: Experience and reflections from modeling with system dynamics2021In: Operational Research Society 10th Simulation Workshop, SW 2021: Proceedings / [ed] Masoud Fakhimi; Tom Boness; Duncan Robertson, Operational Research Society , 2021, p. 117-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expected demographic changes, and especially the rise in life expectancy, will considerably increase elderly patients' demand for healthcare. There are different strategies that can offer better care for these patients, reduce their unnecessary visits to the emergency departments, and in consequence, reduce the number of hospitalizations and days at the hospital. This study employed system dynamics to analyze the economic and quality-related effects of different closer care strategies such as investments in care coordinators and mobile health clinics, as well as to offer proactive care in the primary care facilities for elderly patients. The results indicate that a combination of the different strategies will support better care for patients, will reduce hospital costs and will reduce the existing pressure on the emergency department. The paper also reflects on the process followed to conduct the study and the lessons learned. 

  • 41.
    Linnéusson, Gary
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, Virtual Engineering Research Environment. Department of Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Goienetxea Uriarte, Ainhoa
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, Virtual Engineering Research Environment.
    Learning from simulating with system dynamics in healthcare: evaluating closer care strategies for elderly patients2023In: Journal of Simulation, ISSN 1747-7778, E-ISSN 1747-7786, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 557-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results from a simulation case study analyzing care strategies for elderly patients in a regional healthcare system (HCS) in Sweden. Three strategies to reduce emergency visits, hospitalisations, and stays were evaluated: care coordinators at emergency departments, mobile health clinics visiting fragile patients in their homes, and proactive primary care. Using system dynamics modelling and empirical data, the impact on the regional HCS was explored considering the reduced care demand and demographic changes. Subsequently, the impact on the population's health status was assessed. Combining strategies yielded the best outcome, but improving patients' health status may increase long-term care demand. The study emphasizes the importance of implementing these strategies to offer better care for elderly patients and reduce healthcare costs. Findings highlight the potential long-term effects of improving health status and the need for a comprehensive approach to address the evolving care demands of an ageing population.

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  • 42.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Public Health and Sports Science, Faculty of Occupational and Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Kungsbacksvägen 47, Sweden.
    McGrath, Cormac
    EPIUnit-Instituto de Saude Publica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Taipas 135, 4050-600, Porto, Portugal.
    Common Problems! and Common Solutions? - Teaching at the Intersection Between Public Health and Criminology: A Public Health Perspective2024In: Annals of Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-9996, Vol. 90, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public health and criminology share similar current and future challenges, mostly related to crime and health causation, prevention, and sustainable development. Interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches to education at the intersection of public health and criminology can be an integral part of future training in areas of mutual interest. Based on reflections on teaching criminology students, this viewpoint discusses the main interconnections between public health and criminology teaching through the public health lens. The paper discusses potential challenges associated with interdisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. Among these challenges is communication across the different fields and their perspectives to be able to achieve the desired complementarity at the intersection of the two disciplines. 

  • 43.
    Mannebäck, Emelie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    ISMS and privacy challenges related to PeHS: A Qualitative study2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The future of healthcare is increasingly digital, which includes a shift towards more personalised services that allow for more patient-centred and transparent patient care. These services are defined as PeHS and although there are great potential benefits of these services, there are also challenges regarding infor[1]mation security and privacy related to providing this type of services. This thesis project aims to examine the state of ISMS related to PeHS, which would also involve an examination of considerations taken regarding privacy in PeHS.

    The data collection methods for this thesis project were a systematic literature review and qualitative interviews.In total 18,667 publications published between 2017 and 2022 were found during the database searches. When the selection criteria had been applied 17 publications from the search process and 1 publication from the backward snowball process were accepted. The accepted publications were analysed by applying thematic analysis. Furthermore, two interviews with three participants were conducted after the literature review had been completed. The interview material was analysed by applying the analysis method of qualitative content analysis.

    The results showed that there are several challenges regarding ISMS and privacy related to PeHS. For example, there is a lack of knowledge within the organisations on why they should be applying the methods and tools available to ensure the security of the information flow through the healthcare services. Another example is the challenge of keeping up with the pace of digitalisation and adjust the ISMS to ensure sufficient information security of the services.

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  • 44.
    Moll, Jonas
    et al.
    Centre for empirical research on information systems, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    The Effect of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records on Communication and Involvement in Care: A National Patient Survey in Sweden2020In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 270, p. 1056-1060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) have been implemented nationally in Sweden, as well as internationally, as a means of supporting patient engagement and shared decision making. Few studies have, however, investigated the long-term effects of PAEHRs on communicaiton with care professionals and involvement in care. The national survey study presented here, answered by 2587 patients in Sweden, focuses on these aspects specifically. The results show that the Swedish PAEHR system Journalen has had a positive impact on communication with care overall (84% agree or strongly agree with that communication with medical staff has improved), but only 31% agree or strongly agree with that the content of the PAEHR is discussed with care professionals. Journalen also seems to have a positive impact on involvement in care, but the results are mixed when it comes to effects on shared decision making.

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  • 45.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys.
    Nygren, Mikaela
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Öhrn, Annica
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet ; Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centrum för hälso- och vårdutveckling, Patientsäkerhet.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    A new zero vision for Swedish patient safety - but how do we know that health care is becoming safer?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi.
    Nygren, Mikaela
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Öhrn, Annica
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet ; Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centrum för hälso- och vårdutveckling, Patientsäkerhet.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Patientsäkerhet svårt att uppnå, svårt att värdera: Landstingens patientsäkerhetsberättelser granskas och diskuteras2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 20-21, p. 1028-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ansträngningarna för ökad patientsäkerhet i Sverige intensifierades 2011 i och med den nya patientsäkerhetslagen och den satsning som regeringen och SKL gjorde på prestationsbaserad ersättning till landstingen.

    Förväntningarna på ökad patientsäkerhet i Sverige är stora, men frågan är hur vi kan veta att vården blir säkrare.

    Med avstamp i ett ramverk – en vidareutveckling av Donabedians triad – och genom tillägg av en kontextuell komponent och komplettering med en lärandedimension belyses svårigheterna och möjligheterna vid utvärdering av patientsäkerhet.

    Ramverkets olika komponenter diskuteras med hänvisning till vad som redovisas i de patientsäkerhetsberättelser som landstingen har sammanställt för att beskriva sitt arbete med patientsäkerhet.

  • 47.
    Nordblom, Ann-Katrin
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Sweden ; Faculty of Caring Sciences, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Norberg Boysen, Gabriella
    Faculty of Caring Sciences, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden ; PreHospen - Centre for Prehospital Research, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Kjellsdotter, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Sweden.
    Health care centre and emergency department utilization by patients with episodes of tachycardia2022In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Outpatients seek to visit health care facilities for episodes of tachycardia-related signs and symptoms. The challenge for physicians is to balance a proper initial assessment and avoid overlooking a possible arrhythmia. This common clinical situation affects individuals and health care utilization, and effective management may substantially affect health care resources. This study aimed to explore health care utilization for outpatients with episodes of tachycardia visiting health care centres (HCCs) and/or emergency departments (EDs). METHOD: This retrospective study used data of adult outpatients (≥ 18 years) who were assessed by a physician as having a specific or nonspecific diagnosis of arrhythmia between 2017 and 2018, and data were retrieved from medical records and a regional registry database. Data was analysed with appropriate statistical analyses to identify disparities between sex, age and terms of search pattern for each health care facility. Analysis of variance was used to test disparities between the sexes, and one-factor ANOVA was used for the incidence of missed arrhythmias. RESULTS: A total of 2719 visits with 2373 outpatients were included in the study. The result showed a significant difference in the total number of visits (n = 2719) between female and male patients (68% vs. 32%, p < .001). In the 60-69- and 70-79-year age groups, females had significantly higher frequencies of visits than males (p = .018). A significant difference was also observed between sexes in terms of which health care facility they tended to visit (p < .001). Ninety-five percent of the outpatients visiting EDs were hospitalized. When estimating the incidence of missed arrhythmias (diagnoses) in relation to assessments, the results showed a 5% missed diagnosis involving potential atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia and atrioventricular re-entry tachycardia. Moreover, the referral rate was low, especially from HCCs to cardiologists. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a significant difference in total visits in HCCs and/or EDs by patients of different sexes and indicates the need for improved care for outpatients with episodes of tachycardia. Sex- and age-related differences must be addressed with an aim of providing equal care. Finally, the low rate of referral from HCCs to cardiologists compared to the high proportion of hospitalizations from EDs, deserves further investigation. 

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  • 48.
    Nygren, Mikaela
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Determinants of Patient Safety - Perceptions of Swedish Patient Safety Experts2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Nygren, Mikaela
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Öhrn, Annica
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Rahmqvist, Mikael
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Factors influencing patient safety in Sweden: perceptions of patient safety officers in the county councils2013In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: National, regional and local activities to improve patient safety in Sweden have increased over the last decade. There are high ambitions for improved patient safety in Sweden. This study surveyed health care professionals who held key positions in their county council’s patient safety work to investigate their perceptions of the conditions for this work, factors they believe have been most important in reaching the current level of patient safety and factors they believe would be most important for achieving improved patient safety in the future.

    Methods: The study population consisted of 218 health care professionals holding strategic positions in patient safety work in Swedish county councils. Using a questionnaire, the following topics were analysed in this study: profession/occupation; number of years involved in a designated task on patient safety issues; knowledge/overview of the county council’s patient safety work; ability to influence this work; conditions for this work; and the importance of various factors for current and future levels of patient safety.

    Results: The response rate to the questionnaire was 79%. The conditions that had the highest number of responses in complete agreement were “patients’ involvement is important for patient safety” and “patient safety work has good support from the county council’s management”. Factors that were considered most important for achieving the current level of patient safety were root cause and risk analyses, incident reporting and the Swedish Patient Safety Law. An organizational culture that encourages reporting and avoids blame was considered most important for improved patient safety in the future, closely followed by improved communication between health care practitioners and patients.

    Conclusion: Health care professionals with important positions in the Swedish county councils’ patient safety work believe that conditions for this work are somewhat constrained. They attribute the current levels of patient safety to a broad range of factors and believe that many different solutions can contribute to enhanced patient safety in the future, suggesting that this work must be multifactorial.

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  • 50.
    Nässén, Kristina
    et al.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, Department of Caring Science, University of Borås, Sweden, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, USA.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Health care professionals' experiences of possibilities and constraints in caring for older adults living with long-term pain in community home care2023In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 65, article id 101134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring for a growing population of older adults with complex health problems in their homes is part of every-day work for many health care professionals in the world. This qualitative interview study explores the way health care professionals perceive possibilities and constraints when caring for older adults living with long-term pain in community home care in Sweden. The study aims to understand the relationship between health care professionals' subjective experiences and social structures such as the organization of care and shared norms and values in regard to their perceived space of action. Findings provide insight into how institutional structures such as organization and time, conflate with cultural notions, norms, and ideals, and how these enable and constrain health care professionals in their daily work but also create dilemmas. Findings suggest centering the meaning of structuring aspects in social organizations as a tool for reflection on priorities, improvement, and development in care settings. 

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