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  • 1.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Muller, Jasmin
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Promoting health of Swedish workers by complementary methods: example of a study design of a longitudinal randomized controlled intervention study2017In: Medical Research Archives, ISSN 2375-1916, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When designing, implementing, and evaluating a work site health promotion program, it is necessary to ensure that the program is evidence based. The present article aims to present in-depth information on the design of a longitudinal randomized controlled complementary intervention pilot study that follows the Consort recommendations to evaluate possible effects of a health promotive intervention in healthy workers.

    Methods: Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to mental training programs, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to mental training programs only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to mental training programs, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). The study lasted for eight weeks. Immediately before the randomization, after four weeks and after eight weeks the participants responded to statements from the Swedish Scale of Personality and had their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature measured.

    Results: Receiving mechanical massage and listening to mental training programs, either separately or in combination, during working hours had some positive effects on the employees’ own evaluation of their health, as well as their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature. However, the intervention need to be evaluated further.

    Conclusion: The approach described makes it possible to design, implement and evaluate a work site health promotion program, also on pilot-study level and these results should be seen as a first step towards larger randomized studies. This types of studies need to focus on healthy participants and special care should be taken to guarantee adequately powered study groups and their homogeneity.

  • 2.
    Ljungström, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital.
    Jacobsson, Gunnar
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital / The swedish strategic program against antibiotic resistance.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Tilevik, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    The diagnostic value of PCT as biomarker in patients suspected with community-onset bacterial sepsis2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Nolskog, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Region of Västra Götaland, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Backhaus, Erik
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nasic, Salmir
    Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Enroth, Helena
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Clinical molecular microbiology, Laboratory Medicine, Unilabs, Skövde, Sweden.
    STI with Mycoplasma genitalium: More common than Chlamydia trachomatis in patients attending youth clinics in Sweden2019In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 81-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis in Sweden is well known, whereas the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium is less well documented. Youth clinics offer free contraception advice, sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and/or contact tracing for the age group 15–25 years. The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of STIs, the presence of symptoms and the role of contact tracing. From July 2013 to March 2014, 1001 persons, 509 women and 492 men, were included in this study of six youth clinics in the Region of Västra Götaland. Symptoms were registered and whether the patient was tested because of contract tracing. Collection of urine samples, testing, treatment and disease registration were performed according to clinical routines. Urine samples were analysed for C. trachomatis/N. gonorrhoeae on the Cobas 4800 system (Roche). M. genitalium was analysed by lab-developed PCR. Genital infection was present in 16.8%. The prevalence of M. genitalium was higher than for C. trachomatis (9.6% and 7.1%). Men with symptoms have a significantly higher relative risk for infection with M. genitalium or C. trachomatis compared to asymptomatic men, while there is no increase for women. Contact tracing is important since positive outcome has a high relative risk for both infections. The prevalence of M. genitalium was higher than C. trachomatis in this study population. Initial testing for both C. trachomatis and M. genitalium should at least be considered for young men presenting with symptoms of genital infection. In finding positive cases, contact tracing is of great importance. © 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

  • 4.
    Sedghi, Maryam
    et al.
    Medical Genetics Laboratory, Alzahra University Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.
    Salari, Mehri
    Department of Neurology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Moslemi, Ali-Reza
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kariminejad, Ariana
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology and Genetics Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Davis, Mark
    Department of Diagnostic Genomics, Pathwest, QEII Medical Centre, Australia.
    Goullée, Hayley
    Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia / Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Australia.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Laing, Nigel
    Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia / Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Australia.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia / Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Australia.
    Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder in a family deficient for MRE11A, caused by a MRE11 variant2018In: Neurology: Genetics, ISSN 2376-7839, Vol. 4, no 6, article id e295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective We report 3 siblings with the characteristic features of ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder associated with a homozygous MRE11 synonymous variant causing nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and MRE11A deficiency. Methods Clinical assessments, next-generation sequencing, transcript and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. Results The patients presented with poor balance, developmental delay during the first year of age, and suffered from intellectual disability from early childhood. They showed oculomotor apraxia, slurred and explosive speech, limb and gait ataxia, exaggerated deep tendon reflex, dystonic posture, and mirror movement in their hands. They developed mild cognitive abilities. Brain MRI in the index case revealed cerebellar atrophy. Next-generation sequencing revealed a homozygous synonymous variant in MRE11 (c.657C>T, p.Asn219=) that we show affects splicing. A complete absence of MRE11 transcripts in the index case suggested NMD and immunohistochemistry confirmed the absence of a stable protein. Conclusions Despite the critical role of MRE11A in double-strand break repair and its contribution to the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, the absence of MRE11A is compatible with life. 

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