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  • 1.
    Behnsen, Pia
    et al.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Buil, Joanne M.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Koot, Susanne
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Van Lier, Poul
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Heart rate (variability) and the association between relational peer victimization and internalizing symptoms in elementary school children2019In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, p. 1-9, article id 29 aprilArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relational victimization typically emerges first during the elementary school period, and has been associated with increased levels of internalizing symptoms in children. Individual differences in autonomic nervous system functioning have been suggested as a potential factor linking social stressors and internalizing symptoms. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether heart rate and heart rate variability mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms in 373 mainstream elementary school children. Children were assessed in 2015 (T 0 ; Grades 3-5, M age = 9.78 years, 51% boys) and reassessed in 2016 (T 1 ). Heart rate and heart rate variability were assessed during a regular school day at T 1 . A multi-informant (teacher and peer report) cross-time measure of relational victimization, and a multi-informant (self- and teacher report) measure of internalizing problems at T 1 was used. Results showed that heart rate variability, but not heart rate, mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms. This study provides tentative support that in children from a general population sample, a psychobiological factor may mediate the association of relational victimization with internalizing symptoms.

  • 2.
    Bjerkeli, Pernilla J.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Clinical Sciences, Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Vicente, Raquel Perez
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Mulinari, Shai
    Department of Sociology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johnell, Kristina
    Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Merlo, Juan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden / Center for Primary Health Care Research, Region Skåne, Malmö, Sweden.
    Overuse of methylphenidate: an analysis of Swedish pharmacy dispensing data2018In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 10, p. 1657-1665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To identify overuse of methylphenidate and to investigate patterns of overuse in relation to sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Patients and methods: Swedish national, pharmacy dispensing data were analyzed for all 56,922 individuals aged 6-79 years, who filled a methylphenidate prescription between 2010 and 2011. Overuse was defined as having above 150% days covered by the dispensed amount during 365 days from the first prescription fill, assuming use at the maximum recommended daily dose. Results: In total, 4,304 individuals (7.6% of the methylphenidate users) were categorized as overusers. The risk of overuse increased with age (OR for 46-65 years vs 6-12 years 17.5, 95% CI 14.3-21.3), and was higher in men (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.5) and individuals with low income (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2), as well as in individuals with an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.6), health care visits (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.4), previous ADHD medication use (OR 2.6, 95% CI 2.4-2.8), and previous diagnosis of mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (OR 2.1 95% CI 2.0-2.3). Conclusion: Among individuals using methylphenidate in Sweden, 7.6% receive amounts that are larger than what they should have a medical need for, assuming that they were using the maximum recommended daily dose 365 days per year. Notably, the prevalence of overuse was associated with previous diagnosis of alcohol and drug misuse. The prevalence was also positively associated with higher age and previous use of ADHD medication. These findings may point toward a link between exposure time and overuse. However, future studies with long-term data are needed to investigate this.

  • 3.
    Drungaite, Akvile
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Anorexia Nervosa: What Makes Patients Feel Better During the Illness and the Process of Recovery?2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Objective: When caring for a patient with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) it is difficult for the registered nurses to develop a good nurse-patient relationship due to a lack of understanding for the illness.  It is important for the nurse to understand the suffering that the AN patients experience, and what makes them feel better, to be able to improve the patient-nurse relationship. This study aims to explore what makes patients with AN feel better during the illness and the process of recovery.

    Method: A qualitative scientific approach was used. Eight autobiographies were selected as data for this study. Both English and Swedish books were used. The data was analyzed using a qualitative method of data analysis.

    Results: The ways patients with AN could feel better are presented in seven themes: being seen as a whole individual behind the illness, being able to trust and find security, taking responsibility for recovery, finding motivation to keep fighting towards recovery, when one's suffering is noticed, filling a void, and the strengthening of the relationship between care giver and patient. This study may help registered nurses understand the needs of the patient recovering from AN and help them meet these needs in a better way.

  • 4.
    Engqvist, Inger
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Skaraborg Hospitals, Falköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The recovery process of postpartum psychosis from both the woman's and next of kin's perspective: An interview study in Sweden2014In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 8-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Objectives: The most serious type of psychiatric disorder in connection with childbirth is postpartum psychosis. With this disorder occasionally follows emotional rejection of the infant which has serious long term effect on mother and child. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of the recovery process of postpartum psychosis from the women, from the partners of the women, and their next of kin.

    Methods: Interviews were conducted with seven women, who had previously suffered postpartum psychosis, and six of their next of kin. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.

    Results: Two categories emerged: the recovery process and the circumstances of the support provided. The women and their next of kin spoke about the turning point in the illness, their own personal as well as their social recovery, the importance of support not only from relatives and friends, but also from professionals, and the use of medication. However, the key to recovery was an internal decision by the women themselves.

    Conclusion: Conclusion is that the recovery from this severe mental disorder requires hard work and the key to their recovery was the decision made by the women. This disorder causes a mental darkness to descend, but at the start of the recovery a dim light shines in the dark tunnel. The nursing staff must be made aware that good sleep is important for the psychiatric treatment and that recovery may take a long time. The nurse needs to provide hope and encouragement, as well as help the woman to recognise the strength that exists within her. To reduce the risk of a recurrence of the disorder, the staff needs to offer follow up visits.

  • 5.
    Frost, Morgan
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Social perception in Autism: An eye tracking and pupillometric study2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Typically developing humans innately place subjective value on social information and orient attention to it. This can be shown through eye tracking and pupillometry, a method used to show attentional engagement. Social brain development and social preference is present from infancy, and is thought to rely on a carefully balanced network of neurotransmitters and neural connections. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) presents altered neural systems which cause individuals to perceive and process social information differently, but the neurophysiology of this difference remains unclear. Previous research shows atypical gaze patterns, hyperarousal, and lack of orienting to social stimuli in ASD. Since autism is highly comorbid and shares traits with other neurodevelopmental disorders, it is difficult to distinguish aspects of these social processing differences. This study used a group of 35 neuropsychiatric patients to investigate how individuals with autism process social and non-social scenes. Eye tracking and pupillometry measures were collected while participants observed images of natural scenes with or without a person. Participants with autism did not show a pupillary response to social images and were slower to fixate on the face  region than the other participants. Additionally there were correlations between clinical measures of social functioning and the length of time it took to fixate to faces. The results highlight important distinctions of social processing in autism. This thesis proposes a new perspective of looking at the social deficits present in autism spectrum disorder. It suggests reframing the current discussion from two leading hypotheses to a unified approach and formally considering the limitations of differing types of stimuli.

  • 6.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden.
    Makinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden / Uppsala University, Department of Sociology, Sweden.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden / University of Tokyo, The Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan / London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (ECOHOST), London, United Kingdom.
    The Historical Development of Suicide Mortality in Russia, 1870-20072015In: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1573-8159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Russia has one of the highest suicide mortality rates in the world. This study investigates the development of Russian suicide mortality over a longer time period in order to provide a context within which the contemporary high level might be better understood. Annual sex- and age-specific suicide-mortality data for Russia for the period 1870-2007 were studied, where available. Russian suicide mortality increased 11-fold over the period. Trends in male and female suicide developed similarly, although male suicide rates were consistently much higher. From the 1990s suicide has increased in a relative sense among the young (15-34), while the high suicide mortality among middle-aged males has reduced. Changes in Russian suicide mortality over the study period may be attributable to modernization processes.

  • 7.
    Källvik, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nilsson, Madeleine
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Vårdandet av patienter med Anorexia Nervosa: Upplevelser ur ett patient- och sjuksköterskeperspektiv2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Anorexia Nervosa is a complex disease that requires an individual treatment. Patients with Anorexia are known to be ambivalent when it comes to making a recovery and therefore need strong teamwork and a good relationship with the nurse. The aim of this study is to examine what good care means for the patient and the nurse when it comes to treating Anorexia Nervosa. The essay is a literature review based on ten scientific articles. In the result, which is divided in two parts, seven themes arise and these are: independence, social support, isolation, a challenge, the relationship, caring and respect and trust. In the result it was revealed that the patients prioritize support from the nurses, showing that they care and don’t judge the patients. The nurses describe compassion, trust, acceptance and mutual respect as important parts in the given care. The conclusion is that a good relationship between the nurse and patient means a great deal to achieve success when treating Anorexia Nervosa. Hopefully this study gives nurses an ability to learn from the presented material, and be able to improve the care of girls suffering from Anorexia Nervosa.

  • 8.
    Labbé, Daniel
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    The Feeling of Anxiety: Phenomenology and neural correlates2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The feeling of anxiety, a conscious experience, is associated with uneasiness, painfulness, or disturbing suspense. The current paper presents the phenomenology of anxiety disorders based on diagnostic criteria and reviews neuroimaging studies on anxiety including dissociation studies. Activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, insula, temporal poles and amygdala suggest neural correlates of anxiety. The relevance of the neural correlates, how the feeling of anxiety differs from fear and worry, and the construct validity of anxiety are addressed. Anxiety and pain correlate with activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, which warrants further studies on the painfulness–anxiety relationship.

  • 9.
    Sandman, Nils
    et al.
    Genomics and Biomarkers Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Psychology and Speech Language Pathology, Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Turku Brain and Mind Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Merikanto, Ilona
    Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Määttänen, Hanna
    Department of Psychology and Speech Language Pathology, Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Turku Brain and Mind Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Psychology and Speech Language Pathology, Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Turku Brain and Mind Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kronholm, Erkki
    Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland.
    Laatikainen, Tiina
    Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland / Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland / Hospital District of North Karelia, Joensuu, Finland .
    Partonen, Timo
    Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Paunio, Tiina
    Genomics and Biomarkers Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Winter is coming: nightmares and sleep problems during seasonal affective disorder2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 612-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep problems, especially nightmares and insomnia, often accompany depression. This study investigated how nightmares, symptoms of insomnia, chronotype and sleep duration associate with seasonal affective disorder, a special form of depression. Additionally, it was noted how latitude, a proxy for photoperiod, and characteristics of the place of residence affect the prevalence of seasonal affective disorder and sleep problems. To study these questions, data from FINRISK 2012 study were used. FINRISK 2012 consists of a random population sample of Finnish adults aged 25–74 years (n = 4905) collected during winter from Finnish urban and rural areas spanning the latitudes of 60°N to 66°N. The Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire was used to assess symptoms of seasonal affective disorder. Participants with symptoms of seasonal affective disorder had significantly increased odds of experiencing frequent nightmares and symptoms of insomnia, and they were more often evening chronotypes. Associations between latitude, population size and urbanicity with seasonal affective disorder symptoms and sleep disturbances were generally not significant, although participants living in areas bordering urban centres had less sleep problems than participants from other regions. These data show that the prevalence of seasonal affective disorder was not affected by latitude. 

  • 10.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Iliadis, Stavros I.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Huizink, Anja
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Section of Clinical Developmental Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Freyhult, Eva
    Department of Medical Science, National Bioinformatics Infrastructure Sweden, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stress-related genetic polymorphisms in association with peripartum depression symptoms and stress hormones: A longitudinal population-based study2019In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 103, p. 296-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual differences in the response of the stress system to hormonal changes during pregnancy and the postpartum period render some women susceptible to developing depression. The present study sought to investigate peripartum depression and stress hormones in relation to stress-related genotypes. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to assess peripartum depressive symptoms in a sample of 1629 women, followed from pregnancy week seventeen to six months postpartum. Genotypes of ninety-four haplotype-tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in sixteen genes of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis pathway were analyzed and data on psychosocial and demographic factors was collected. In sub-studies, salivary cortisol awakening response in gestational week 35–39, salivary evening cortisol levels in gestational week 36 and postpartum week 6, and blood cortisol and cortisone levels in gestational week 35–39 were analyzed. SNP-set kernel association tests were performed at the gene-level, considering psychosocial and demographic factors, followed by post-hoc analyses of SNPs of significant genes. Statistically significant findings at the 0.05 p-level included SNPs in the hydroxysteroid 11-beta dehydrogenase 1 (HSD11B1) gene in relation to self-rated depression scores in postpartum week six among all participants, and serpin family A member 6 (SERPINA6) gene at the same time-point among women with de novo onset of postpartum depression. SNPs in these genes also associated with stress hormone levels during pregnancy. The present study adds knowledge to the neurobiological basis of peripartum depression by systematically assessing SNPs in stress-regulatory genes and stress-hormone levels in a population-based sample of women. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

  • 11.
    Trigo Algar, Antonio Rafael
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Serious Games For Overcoming Phobias: The Benefits of Game Elements2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis analyses the benefits of applying game elements to a Virtual Reality application for overcoming phobias, with a special focus on acrophobia, i.e. the fear of heights. Two different prototypes using the Oculus Rift head-mounted display were developed with a gradually exposure to heights. Both prototypes shared the same acrophobic scenario, but one included extra features from games such as engagement, motivation or goals. Twenty-four participants, divided into two groups of twelve, with moderate aversion to heights tested the prototypes. The participants’ heart rate and the time that they looked down from high altitudes were also measured and evaluated. The study showed slightly higher results regarding motivation for the prototype which included the additional game elements. Future studies should include a different head-mounted display, which would allow a longer time of play without motion sickness, and the participation of people diagnosed with acrophobia.

  • 12.
    Zare, Zahra
    et al.
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ranjbar, Fatemeh
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Ekman, Robert
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Farahbakhsh, Mostafa
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Maghsoudi, Hemmat
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Cognitive Distortions as Trauma-Specific Irrational Beliefs Among Burn Patients2019In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 361-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burn injuries are most certainly stressful events, particularly when permanent disfigurement is a result. This situation can lead to the onset of irrational beliefs which can in turn lead to long-term psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, shame, guilt, posttraumatic stress, etc. The objective of this study is to explore the irrational beliefs among burn patients and its correlates in an Iranian sample. This cross-sectional study included 329 patients who had experienced disfigurement, as result of burn injuries. In order to assess irrational beliefs, a Scale for Irrational Thoughts after Burning was used. To identify correlated variables with irrational beliefs, both bivariate and multivariate analysis methods were conducted. In multivariate linear regression, forward strategy was used for building the model. The results of bivariate analysis showed that the location of the burn on bodies (body parts generally exposed in social environment or parts culturally perceived as sensitive areas of body), marital status, urbanities, age group, geographical areas, etiology of burning, and intent of injury had significant relationships with irrational beliefs (P < .05). Using forward linear regression, gender, marital status, geographical areas, etiology of burning, body burn by location (body parts generally exposed in social environment or parts culturally perceived as sensitive areas of body), and intent of injury had significant correlation with irrational beliefs. The models predicted 15.5% (P < .001) of irrational beliefs. Considering to irrational beliefs and development of facilities for screening is necessary. Moreover, consultation with mental health experts after burn injuries is highly recommended. 

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