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  • 1.
    Alhardallo, Mutaz
    et al.
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar ; College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Baco, Abdul M.
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Second ever reported case of central cause of unilateral foot drop due to cervical disc herniation: Case report and review of literature2021In: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports, E-ISSN 2210-2612, Vol. 83, article id 105928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Foot drop is defined as a weakness in the ankle and foot dorsiflexors. A disruption of the neural pathway starting from the motor prefrontal cortex and ending in the peroneal nerve can lead to foot drop. Foot drop due to lower motor neuron injury is well documented. However, foot drop due to a central cause of cervical disc prolapse is very rare. Case presentation: A 55-year-old male presenting with neck pain, right and left arms radicular pain and numbness, and unilateral right foot drop following cervical disc prolapse. The patient presented with upper motor neuron lesion signs. MRI showed cervical disc prolapse at two levels, confirming central cause of foot drop. The patient underwent anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery. Discussion: Following decompression and fusion of involved cervical spine disc pathology, the patient had complete recovery of his right foot drop. Conclusions: Central causes, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of foot drop. Causes could be due to the compression effect of the cortico-spinal tract of the cervical spinal cord. Satisfactory results can be achieved upon correcting the causative lesion. 

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  • 2.
    Almirón Santa-Bárbara, Rafael
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Hospital de Antequera, Malaga, Spain ; School of Medicine, Universidad de Málaga, Spain.
    García Rivera, Francisco
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, Virtual Engineering Research Environment.
    Lamb, Maurice
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment. University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, Virtual Engineering Research Environment.
    Víquez Da-Silva, Rodrigo
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, Spain.
    Gutiérrez Bedmar, Mario
    Preventive Medicine and Public Health Department, School of Medicine, University of Málaga, Spain ; Biomedical Research Institute of Malaga-IBIMA, Spain ; CIBERCV Cardiovascular Diseases, Carlos III Health Institute, Madrid, Spain.
    New technologies for the classification of proximal humeral fractures: Comparison between Virtual Reality and 3D printed models—a randomised controlled trial2023In: Virtual Reality, ISSN 1359-4338, E-ISSN 1434-9957, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 1623-1634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Correct classification of fractures according to their patterns is critical for developing a treatment plan in orthopaedic surgery. Unfortunately, for proximal humeral fractures (PHF), methods for proper classification have remained a jigsaw puzzle that has not yet been fully solved despite numerous proposed classifications and diagnostic methods. Recently, many studies have suggested that three-dimensional printed models (3DPM) can improve the interobserver agreement on PHF classifications. Moreover, Virtual Reality (VR) has not been properly studied for classification of shoulder injuries. The current study investigates the PHF classification accuracy relative to an expert committee when using either 3DPM or equivalent models displayed in VR among 36 orthopaedic surgery residents from different hospitals. We designed a multicentric randomised controlled trial in which we created two groups: a group exposed to a total of 34 3DPM and another exposed to VR equivalents. Association between classification accuracy and group assignment (VR/3DPM) was assessed using mixed effects logistic regression models. The results showed VR can be considered a non-inferior technology for classifying PHF when compared to 3DPM. Moreover, VR may be preferable when considering possible time and resource savings along with potential uses of VR for presurgical planning in orthopaedics. 

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  • 3.
    Axelsson, K. F.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, R.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, M.
    Geriatric Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effectiveness of a minimal resource fracture liaison service2016In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 3165-3175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate if a 2-year intervention with a minimal resource fracture liaison service (FLS) was associated with increased investigation and medical treatment and if treatment was related to reduced re-fracture risk.

    METHODS: The FLS started in 2013 using existing secretaries (without an FLS coordinator) at the emergency department and orthopaedic wards to identify risk patients. All patients older than 50 years of age with a fractured hip, vertebra, shoulder, wrist or pelvis were followed during 2013-2014 (n = 2713) and compared with their historic counterparts in 2011-2012 (n = 2616) at the same hospital. Re-fractures were X-ray verified. A time-dependent adjusted (for age, sex, previous fracture, index fracture type, prevalent treatment, comorbidity and secondary osteoporosis) Cox model was used.

    RESULTS: The minimal resource FLS increased the proportion of DXA-investigated patients after fracture from 7.6 to 39.6 % (p < 0.001) and the treatment rate after fracture from 12.6 to 31.8 %, which is well in line with FLS types using the conventional coordinator model. Treated patients had a 51 % lower risk of any re-fracture than untreated patients (HR 0.49, 95 % CI 0.37-0.65 p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: We found that our minimal resource FLS was effective in increasing investigation and treatment, in line with conventional coordinator-based services, and that treated patients had a 51 % reduced risk of new fractures, indicating that also non-coordinator based fracture liaison services can improve secondary prevention of fractures.

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  • 4.
    Axelsson, K. F.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wallander, M.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, H.
    Institute for Health and Ageing, Catholic University of Australia, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, M.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and ClinicalNutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Hip fracture risk and safety with alendronate treatment in the oldest-old2017In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 282, no 6, p. 546-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. There is high evidence for secondary prevention of fractures, including hip fracture, with alendronate treatment, but alendronate's efficacy to prevent hip fractures in the oldest-old (80 years old), the population with the highest fracture risk, has not been studied. Objective. To investigate whether alendronate treatment amongst the oldest-old with prior fracture was related to decreased hip fracture rate and sustained safety. Methods. Using a national database of men and women undergoing a fall risk assessment at a Swedish healthcare facility, we identified 90 795 patients who were 80 years or older and had a prior fracture. Propensity score matching (four to one) was then used to identify 7844 controls to 1961 alendronate-treated patients. The risk of incident hip fracture was investigated with Cox models and the interaction between age and treatment was investigated using an interaction term. Results. The case and control groups were well balanced in regard to age, sex, anthropometrics and comorbidity. Alendronate treatment was associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture in crude (hazard ratio (HR) 0.62 (0.49-0.79), P < 0.001) and multivariable models (HR 0.66 (0.51-0.86), P < 0.01). Alendronate was related to reduced mortality risk (HR 0.88 (0.82-0.95) but increased risk of mild upper gastrointestinal symptoms (UGI) (HR 1.58 (1.12-2.24). The alendronate association did not change with age for hip fractures or mild UGI. Conclusion. In old patients with prior fracture, alendronate treatment reduces the risk of hip fracture with sustained safety, indicating that this treatment should be considered in these high-risk patients.

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  • 5.
    Axelsson, Kristian F.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anna G.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wedel, Hans
    Health Metrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Association between alendronate use and hip fracture risk in older patients using oral prednisolone2017In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 318, no 2, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance  Oral glucocorticoid treatment increases fracture risk, and evidence is lacking regarding the efficacy of alendronate to protect against hip fracture in older patients using glucocorticoids.Objective  To investigate whether alendronate treatment in older patients using oral prednisolone is associated with decreased hip fracture risk and adverse effects.Design, Setting, and Participants  Retrospective cohort study using a national database (N = 433 195) of patients aged 65 years or older undergoing a health evaluation (baseline) at Swedish health care facilities; 1802 patients who were prescribed alendronate after at least 3 months of oral prednisolone treatment (≥5 mg/d) were identified. Propensity score matching was used to select 1802 patients without alendronate use from 6076 patients taking prednisolone with the same dose and treatment time criteria. Follow-up occurred between January 2008 and December 2014.Exposures  Alendronate vs no alendronate use; no patients had previously taken alendronate at the time of prednisolone initiation.Main Outcomes and Measures  The primary outcome was incident hip fracture.Results  Of the 3604 included patients, the mean age was 79.9 (SD, 7.5) years, and 2524 (70%) were women. After a median follow-up of 1.32 years (interquartile range, 0.57-2.34 years), there were 27 hip fractures in the alendronate group and 73 in the no-alendronate group, corresponding to incidence rates of 9.5 (95% CI, 6.5-13.9) and 27.2 (95% CI, 21.6-34.2) fractures per 1000 person-years, with an absolute rate difference of −17.6 (95% CI, −24.8 to −10.4). The use of alendronate was associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in a multivariable-adjusted Cox model (hazard ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.22-0.54). Alendronate treatment was not associated with increased risk of mild upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms (alendronate vs no alendronate, 15.6 [95% CI, 11.6-21.0] vs 12.9 [95% CI, 9.3-18.0] per 1000 person-years; P = .40) or peptic ulcers (10.9 [95% CI, 7.7-15.5] vs 11.4 [95% CI, 8.0-16.2] per 1000 person-years; P = .86). There were no cases of incident drug-induced osteonecrosis and only 1 case of femoral shaft fracture in each group.Conclusions and Relevance  Among older patients using medium to high doses of prednisolone, alendronate treatment was associated with a significantly lower risk of hip fracture over a median of 1.32 years. Although the findings are limited by the observational study design and the small number of events, these results support the use of alendronate in this patient group.

  • 6.
    Axelsson, Kristian F.
    et al.
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Werling, Malin
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Szabo, Eva
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Näslund, Ingmar
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Wedel, Hans
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Fracture risk after gastric bypass surgery – a retrospective cohort study2018In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 2122-2131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastric bypass surgery constitutes the most common and effective bariatric surgery to treat obesity. Gastric bypass leads to bone loss, but fracture risk following surgery has been insufficiently studied. Furthermore, the association between gastric bypass and fracture risk has not been studied in patients with diabetes, which is a risk factor for fracture and affected by surgery. In this retrospective cohort study using Swedish national databases, 38 971 obese patients undergoing gastric bypass were identified, 7758 with diabetes and 31 213 without. An equal amount of well-balanced controls were identified through multivariable 1:1 propensity score matching. The risk of fracture and fall injury was investigated using Cox proportional hazards and flexible parameter models. Fracture risk according to weight loss and degree of calcium and vitamin D supplementation one-year post- surgery was investigated. During a median follow-up time of 3.1 (IQR 1.7-4.6) years, gastric bypass was associated with increased risk of any fracture, in patients with and without diabetes using a multivariable Cox model (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.05- 1.53 and HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18-1.47, respectively). Using flexible parameter models, the fracture risk appeared to increase with time. The risk of fall injury without fracture was also increased after gastric bypass. Larger weight loss or poor calcium and vitamin D supplementation after surgery were not associated with increased fracture risk. In conclusion, gastric bypass surgery is associated with an increased fracture risk, which appears to be increasing with time and not associated with degree of weight loss or calcium and vitamin D supplementation following surgery. An increased risk of fall injury was seen after surgery, which could contribute to the increased fracture risk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Dallora Moraes, Ana Luiza
    et al.
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Brogren, Martin
    Optriva AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kvist, Ola
    Department of Pediatric Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ruiz, Sandra Diaz
    Department of Pediatric Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dübbel, André
    Optriva AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Age Assessment of Youth and Young Adults Using MagneticResonance Imaging of the Knee: A Deep Learning Approach2019In: JMIR Medical Informatics, E-ISSN 2291-9694, Vol. 7, no 4, article id e16291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bone age assessment (BAA) is an important tool for diagnosis and in determining the time of treatment in a number of pediatric clinical scenarios, as well as in legal settings where it is used to estimate the chronological age of an individual where valid documents are lacking. Traditional methods for BAA suffer from drawbacks, such as exposing juveniles to radiation, intra- and interrater variability, and the time spent on the assessment. The employment of automated methods such as deep learning and the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can address these drawbacks and improve the assessment of age. Objective: The aim of this paper is to propose an automated approach for age assessment of youth and young adults in the age range when the length growth ceases and growth zones are closed (14-21 years of age) by employing deep learning using MRI of the knee. Methods: This study carried out MRI examinations of the knee of 402 volunteer subjects-221 males (55.0%) and 181 (45.0%) females-aged 14-21 years. The method comprised two convolutional neural network (CNN) models: the first one selected the most informative images of an MRI sequence, concerning age-assessment purposes; these were then used in the second module, which was responsible for the age estimation. Different CNN architectures were tested, both training from scratch and employing transfer learning. Results: The CNN architecture that provided the best results was GoogLeNet pretrained on the ImageNet database. The proposed method was able to assess the age of male subjects in the range of 14-20.5 years, with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.793 years, and of female subjects in the range of 14-19.5 years, with an MAE of 0.988 years. Regarding the classification of minors-with the threshold of 18 years of age-an accuracy of 98.1% for male subjects and 95.0% for female subjects was achieved. Conclusions: The proposed method was able to assess the age of youth and young adults from 14 to 20.5 years of age for male subjects and 14 to 19.5 years of age for female subjects in a fully automated manner, without the use of ionizing radiation, addressing the drawbacks of traditional methods.

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  • 8.
    Kvist, Ola F. T.
    et al.
    Department of Pediatric Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dallora, Ana Luiza
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ola
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan Sanmartin
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Flodmark, Carl-Erik
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lunds University, Sweden.
    Diaz, Sandra
    Department of Pediatric Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Radiology, Lunds University, Sweden.
    Comparison of reliability of magnetic resonance imaging using cartilage and T1-weighted sequences in the assessment of the closure of the growth plates at the knee2020In: Acta Radiologica Open, E-ISSN 2058-4601, Vol. 9, no 9, p. 1-9, article id 2058460120962732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Growth development is traditionally evaluated with plain radiographs of the hand and wrist to visualize bone structures using ionizing radiation. Meanwhile, MRI visualizes bone and cartilaginous tissue without radiation exposure. Purpose: To determine the state of growth plate closure of the knee in healthy adolescents and young adults and compare the reliability of staging using cartilage sequences and T1-weighted (T1W) sequence between pediatric and general radiologists. Material and Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional study of MRI of the knee with both cartilage and T1W sequences was performed in 395 male and female healthy subjects aged between 14.0 and 21.5 years old. The growth plate of the femur and the tibia were graded using a modified staging scale by two pediatric and two general radiologists. Femur and tibia were graded separately with both sequences. Results: The intraclass correlation was overall excellent. The inter- and intra-observer agreement for pediatric radiologists on T1W was 82% (kappa = 0.73) and 77% (kappa = 0.65) for the femur and 90% (kappa = 0.82) and 87% (kappa = 0.75) for the tibia. The inter-observer agreement for general radiologists on T1W was 69% (kappa = 0.56) for the femur and 56% (kappa = 0.34) for the tibia. Cohen's kappa coefficient showed a higher inter- and intra-observer agreement for cartilage sequences than for T1W: 93% (kappa = 0.86) and 89% (kappa = 0.79) for the femur and 95% (kappa = 0.90) and 91% (kappa = 0.81) for the tibia. Conclusion: Cartilage sequences are more reliable than T1W sequence in the assessment of the growth plate in adolescents and young adults. Pediatric radiology experience is preferable.

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  • 9.
    Kvist, Ola
    et al.
    Department of Paediatric Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Luiza Dallora, Ana
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ola
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan Sanmartin
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Flodmark, Carl-Erik
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lunds University, Sweden.
    Diaz, Sandra
    Department of Paediatric Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Radiology, Lunds University, Sweden.
    A cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging study of factors influencing growth plate closure in adolescents and young adults2021In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 110, no 4, p. 1249-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To assess growth plate fusion by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluate the correlation with sex, age, pubertal development, physical activity and BMI. Methods Wrist, knee and ankle of 958 healthy subjects aged 14.0-21.5 years old were examined using MRI and graded by two radiologists. Correlations of growth plate fusion score with age, pubertal development, physical activity and BMI were assessed. Results Complete growth plate fusion occurred in 75%, 85%, 97%, 98%, 98% and 90%, 97%, 95%, 97%, 98% (radius, femur, proximal- and distal tibia and calcaneus) in 17-year-old females and 19-year-old males, respectively. Complete fusion occurs approximately 2 years earlier in girls than in boys. Pubertal development correlated with growth plate fusion score (rho = 0.514-0.598 for the different growth plate sites) but regular physical activity did not. BMI also correlated with growth plate fusion (rho = 0.186-0.384). Stratified logistic regression showed increased odds ratio (OR F: 2.65-8.71; M: 1.71-4.03) for growth plate fusion of obese or overweight subects versus normal-weight subjects. Inter-observer agreement was high (Kappa = 0.87-0.94). Conclusion Growth plate fusion can be assessed by MRI; occurs in an ascending order, from the foot to the wrist; and is significantly influenced by sex, pubertal development and BMI, but not by physical activity.

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  • 10.
    Lundh, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Coleman, Scott
    Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, USA.
    Riad, Jacques
    Orthopedic Department, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Addressing homogeneity between affected and unaffected sides and upper and lower extremities in unilateral cerebral palsy2012In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 36, no Supplement 1, p. S14-S15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lundh, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Coleman, Scott
    Motion and Sports Lab, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.
    Riad, Jacques
    Orthopaedic Department, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Sweden / Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Movement deviation and asymmetry assessment with three dimensional gait analysis of both upper- and lower extremity results in four different clinical relevant subgroups in unilateral cerebral palsy2014In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 381-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In unilateral cerebral palsy, movement pattern can be difficult to define and quantify. The aim was to assess the degree of deviation and asymmetry in upper and lower extremities during walking.

    Methods

    Forty-seven patients, 45 Gross Motor Function Classification Scale (GMFCS) I and 2 patients GMFCS II, mean age 17.1 years (range 13.1 to 24.0) and 15 matched controls were evaluated. Gait profile score (GPS) and arm posture score (APS) were calculated from three-dimensional gait analysis (GA). Asymmetry was the calculated difference in deviation between affected and unaffected sides.

    Findings

    The GPS was significantly increased compared to the control group on the affected side (6.93 (2.08) versus 4.23 (1.11) degrees) and on the unaffected side (6.67 (2.14)). The APS was also significantly increased on the affected side (10.39 (5.01) versus 5.52 (1.71) degrees) and on the unaffected side (7.13 (2.23)). The lower extremity asymmetry increased (significantly) in comparison with the control group (7.89 (3.82) versus 3.90 (1.01)) and correspondingly in the upper extremity (9.75 (4.62) versus 5.72 (1.84)). The GPS was not different between affected and unaffected sides, however the APS was different (statistically significant).

    Interpretation

    We calculated deviation and asymmetry of movement during walking in unilateral CP, identifying four important clinical groups: close to normal, deviations mainly in the leg, deviations mainly in the arm and those with deviation in the arm and leg. This method can be applied to any patient group, and aid in diagnosing, planning treatment, and prognosis.

  • 12.
    Lundh, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Coleman, Scott
    Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, USA.
    Riad, Jacques
    Ortopaedic, Skaraborgs Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    The relationship between arm posturing and gait deviation in teenagers and young adults with spastic unilateral cerebral palsy2012In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 36, no Supplement 1, p. S13-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Wallander, Marit
    et al.
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Kristian F.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Patients with prostate cancer and androgen deprivation therapy have increased risk of fractures: a study from the fractures and fall injuries in the elderly cohort (FRAILCO)2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 115-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: Osteoporosis is a common complication of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). In this large Swedish cohort study consisting of a total of nearly 180,000 older men, we found that those with prostate cancer and ADT have a significantly increased risk of future osteoporotic fractures. Introduction: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with prostate cancer is associated to increased risk of fractures. In this study, we investigated the relationship between ADT in patients with prostate cancer and the risk of incident fractures and non-skeletal fall injuries both compared to those without ADT and compared to patients without prostate cancer. Methods: We included 179,744 men (79.1 ± 7.9 years (mean ± SD)) from the Swedish registry to which national directories were linked in order to study associations regarding fractures, fall injuries, morbidity, mortality and medications. We identified 159,662 men without prostate cancer, 6954 with prostate cancer and current ADT and 13,128 men with prostate cancer without ADT. During a follow-up of approximately 270,300 patient-years, we identified 10,916 incident fractures including 4860 hip fractures. Results: In multivariable Cox regression analyses and compared to men without prostate cancer, those with prostate cancer and ADT had increased risk of any fracture (HR 95% CI 1.40 (1.28–1.53)), hip fracture (1.38 (1.20–1.58)) and MOF (1.44 (1.28–1.61)) but not of non-skeletal fall injury (1.01 (0.90–1.13)). Patients with prostate cancer without ADT did not have increased risk of any fracture (0.97 (0.90–1.05)), hip fracture (0.95 (0.84–1.07)), MOF (1.01 (0.92–1.12)) and had decreased risk of non-skeletal fall injury (0.84 (0.77–0.92)). Conclusions: Patients with prostate cancer and ADT is a fragile patient group with substantially increased risk of osteoporotic fractures both compared to patients without prostate cancer and compared to those with prostate cancer without ADT. We believe that this must be taken in consideration in all patients with prostate cancer already at the initiation of ADT. 

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  • 14.
    Wallander, Märit
    et al.
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Kristian
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anna G.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Type 2 Diabetes and Risk of Hip Fractures and Non-Skeletal Fall Injuries in the Elderly - A Study from the Fractures and Fall Injuries in the Elderly Cohort (FRAILCO)2017In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 449-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions remain about whether the increased risk of fractures in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is related mainly to increased risk of falling or to bone-specific properties. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the risk of hip fractures and non-skeletal fall injuries in older men and women with and without T2DM. We included 429,313 individuals (80.8 ± 8.2 years (mean ± SD), 58% women) from the Swedish registry "Senior Alert" and linked the data to several nation-wide registers. We identified 79,159 individuals with T2DM (45% with insulin (T2DM-I), 41% with oral antidiabetics (T2DM-O), and 14% with no antidiabetic treatment (T2DM-none)), and 343,603 individuals without diabetes. During a follow-up of approximately 670,000 person-years we identified in total 36,132 fractures (15,572 hip fractures) and 20,019 non-skeletal fall injuries. In multivariable Cox-regression models where the reference group was patients without diabetes and the outcome was hip fracture, T2DM-I was associated with increased risk (adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) [95% CI] 1.24 [1.16-1.32]), T2DM-O with unaffected risk (1.03 [0.97-1.11]) and T2DM-none with reduced risk (0.88 [0.79-0.98]). Both the diagnosis of T2DM-I (HR 1.22 [1.16-1.29]) and T2DM-O (HR 1.12 [1.06-1.18]) but not T2DM-none (1.07 [0.98-1.16]) predicted non-skeletal fall injury. The same pattern was seen regarding other fractures (any, upper arm, ankle and major osteoporotic fracture) but not for wrist fracture. Subset-analyses revealed that in men, the risk of hip fracture was only increased in those with T2DM-I but in women, both the diagnosis of T2DM-O and T2DM-I were related to increased hip fracture risk. In conclusion, the risk of fractures differs substantially among patients with T2DM and an increased risk of hip fracture was primarily seen in insulin-treated patients, while the risk of non-skeletal fall injury was consistently increased in T2DM with any diabetes medication. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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