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  • 1.
    Adawi, Rahim
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Preventing fatal effects of overworking: Product design solution2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “Overworking to death” is a phenomenon that has been noticeable in developing countries. The cause of death is mainly through ischemic strokes. While the victims’ occupations differed, they all shared a common characteristic, being positioned in a sedentary work, ranging from IT workers to doctors. This project’s aim was to develop a product that prevented or decreased the strokes that derived from sedentary overwork. This was mainly tackled by preventing one of the three causes of developing blood props, slowed blood flow. In order to gather rich data of the phenomenon, a qualitative study was conducted in China, during two months. By doing an extensive structured sampling, information rich data could be gathered during a short period of time. Data were derived from observations, questionnaires and an interview, which then was interpreted to customer needs and the final product specification. The final product became a trouser with an in built dynamic compression mechanic, that can compress the veins mostly during sitting activities, in order to prevent blood stasis. The compression mechanic works like the Chinese finger trap; compressing the calves while sitting and stretching the legs forward. It is made only out of polysaccharides fibres; cotton and corn.

  • 2.
    Malmrot, Gustav
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ulver, Erika
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ett sviktande hjärta: patientupplevelser av att leva med en kronisk hjärtsvikt2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the occurrence of obesity increases amongst young people, so increases the risk of more people suffering from heart failure as early as during middle age. The aim is to describe the life experiences of middle aged persons living with chronic heart failure. The literature study is based on twelve published, qualitative, and scientifically proved articles derived from MedLine and Cinahl using queries representing the subject, as well as from manual searching in ScienceDirect and LIBRIS. These articles have been analyzed from a life world perspective. Four main themes and four sub themes were identified from the articles' results. The main themes are "The social life", "Quality of life", "Body failing", and "the Economical impact of chronic heart failure". These represent the main areas where the patients feel the greatest loss due to their condition. The discussion reveals the importance of informing the patients of the common prevalence of the feelings described in this study. Also, the nurse should function as a coach for self-care with continuous follow-ups. The result of this study will hopefully increase the understanding of the heart diseased patients' life situations.

  • 3.
    Olofsson, Peder S.
    et al.
    Center for Bioelectronic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden / Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Steinberg, Benjamin E.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA / The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Sobbi, Roozbeh
    Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Cox, Maureen A.
    The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Ahmed, Mohamed N.
    Center for Heart and Lung Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Oswald, Michaela
    Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Szekeres, Ferenc
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanes, William M.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Introini, Andrea
    Department of Medicine, Solna, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liu, Shu Fang
    Center for Heart and Lung Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Holodick, Nichol E.
    Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Rothstein, Thomas L.
    Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Lövdahl, Cecilia
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chavan, Sangeeta S.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Yang, Huan
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Pavlov, Valentin A.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Broliden, Kristina
    Department of Medicine, Solna, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Diamond, Betty
    The Center for Autoimmune and Musculoskeletal Diseases, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Miller, Edmund J.
    Center for Heart and Lung Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Arner, Anders
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gregersen, Peter K.
    Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Backx, Peter H.
    Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada / Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Mak, Tak W.
    The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Tracey, Kevin J.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Blood pressure regulation by CD4lymphocytes expressing choline acetyltransferase2016In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 1066-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood pressure regulation is known to be maintained by a neuro-endocrine circuit, but whether immune cells contribute to blood pressure homeostasis has not been determined. We previously showed that CD4(+) T lymphocytes that express choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the synthesis of the vasorelaxant acetylcholine, relay neural signals(1). Here we show that these CD4(+)CD44(hi)CD62L(Io) T helper cells by gene expression are a distinct T-cell population defined by ChAT (CD4 T-ChAT). Mice lacking ChAT expression in CD4(+) cells have elevated arterial blood pressure, compared to littermate controls. Jurkat T cells overexpressing ChAT (JT(ChAT)) decreased blood pressure when infused into mice. Co-incubation of JT(ChAT) and endothelial cells increased endothelial cell levels of phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and of nitrates and nitrites in conditioned media, indicating increased release of the potent vasorelaxant nitric oxide. The isolation and characterization of CD4 T-ChAT cells will enable analysis of the role of these cells in hypotension and hypertension, and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies by targeting cell-mediated vasorelaxation.

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