his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12345 1 - 50 of 202
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abdul-Hussein, Saba
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rahl, Karin
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moslemi, Ali-Reza
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Clinical and Medical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Phenotypes of myopathy-related beta-tropomyosin mutants in human and mouse tissue cultures2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9, article id e72396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in TPM2 result in a variety of myopathies characterised by variable clinical and morphological features. We used human and mouse cultured cells to study the effects of β-TM mutants. The mutants induced a range of phenotypes in human myoblasts, which generally changed upon differentiation to myotubes. Human myotubes transfected with the E41K-β-TM(EGFP) mutant showed perinuclear aggregates. The G53ins-β-TM(EGFP) mutant tended to accumulate in myoblasts but was incorporated into filamentous structures of myotubes. The K49del-β-TM(EGFP) and E122K-β-TM(EGFP) mutants induced the formation of rod-like structures in human cells. The N202K-β-TM(EGFP) mutant failed to integrate into thin filaments and formed accumulations in myotubes. The accumulation of mutant β-TM(EGFP) in the perinuclear and peripheral areas of the cells was the striking feature in C2C12. We demonstrated that human tissue culture is a suitable system for studying the early stages of altered myofibrilogenesis and morphological changes linked to myopathy-related β-TM mutants. In addition, the histopathological phenotype associated with expression of the various mutant proteins depends on the cell type and varies with the maturation of the muscle cell. Further, the phenotype is a combinatorial effect of the specific amino acid change and the temporal expression of the mutant protein.

  • 2.
    Abdul-Hussein, Saba
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    van der Ven, Peter F. M.
    Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute for Cell Biology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Clinical and Medical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Expression profiles of muscle disease-associated genes and their isoforms during differentiation of cultured human skeletal muscle cells2012In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 13, article id 262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The formation of contractile myofibrils requires the stepwise onset of expression of muscle specific proteins. It is likely that elucidation of the expression patterns of muscle-specific sarcomeric proteins is important to understand muscle disorders originating from defects in contractile sarcomeric proteins.

    METHODS: We investigated the expression profile of a panel of sarcomeric components with a focus on proteins associated with a group of congenital disorders. The analyses were performed in cultured human skeletal muscle cells during myoblast proliferation and myotube development.

    RESULTS: Our culture technique resulted in the development of striated myotubes and the expression of adult isoforms of the sarcomeric proteins, such as fast TnI, fast TnT, adult fast and slow MyHC isoforms and predominantly skeletal muscle rather than cardiac actin. Many proteins involved in muscle diseases, such as beta tropomyosin, slow TnI, slow MyBPC and cardiac TnI were readily detected in the initial stages of muscle cell differentiation, suggesting the possibility of an early role for these proteins as constituent of the developing contractile apparatus during myofibrillogenesis. This suggests that in disease conditions the mechanisms of pathogenesis for each of the mutated sarcomeric proteins might be reflected by altered expression patterns, and disturbed assembly of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar structures and muscle development.

    CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we here confirm that cell cultures of human skeletal muscle are an appropriate tool to study developmental stages of myofibrillogenesis. The expression of several disease-associated proteins indicates that they might be a useful model system for studying the pathogenesis of muscle diseases caused by defects in specific sarcomeric constituents.

  • 3.
    Abulafia, Carolina
    et al.
    FLENI Foundation Department of Psychiatry, Buenos Aires, Argentina / Applied Neuroscience Laboratory, Institute for Biomedical Research, School of Medical Sciences, Universidad Católica Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina / Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Duarte-Abritta, Bárbara
    FLENI Foundation Department of Psychiatry, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Villarreal, Mirta F.
    FLENI Foundation Department of Psychiatry, Buenos Aires, Argentina / Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Ladrón-de-Guevara, Maria S.
    FLENI Foundation Department of Psychiatry, Buenos Aires, Argentina / Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Garcia, Celeste
    FLENI Foundation Department of Psychiatry, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Sequeyra, Geraldine
    FLENI Foundation Department of Psychiatry, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Sevlever, Gustavo
    FLENI Foundation Department of Psychiatry, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Fiorentini, Leticia
    FLENI Foundation Department of Psychiatry, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Bär, Karl-Jürgen
    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Universitätsklinikum Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Jena, Germany.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA / Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vigo, Daniel E.
    Applied Neuroscience Laboratory, Institute for Biomedical Research, School of Medical Sciences, Universidad Católica Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina / Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Guinjoan, Salvador M.
    FLENI Foundation Department of Psychiatry, Buenos Aires, Argentina / Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina / FLENI Teaching Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine, Buenos Aires, Argentina / Department of Neurophysiology, University of Buenos Aires School of Psychology, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Relationship between Cognitive and Sleep-wake Variables in Asymptomatic Offspring of Patients with Late-onset Alzheimer's Disease2017In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 9, article id 93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early neuropathological changes characteristic of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) involve brain stem and limbic structures that regulate neurovegetative functions, including sleep-wake rhythm. Indeed, sleep pattern is an emerging biomarker and a potential pathophysiological mechanism in LOAD. We hypothesized that cognitively asymptomatic, middle-aged offspring of patients with LOAD (O-LOAD) would display a series of circadian rhythm abnormalities prior to the onset of objective cognitive alterations. We tested 31 children of patients with LOAD (O-LOAD) and 19 healthy individuals without family history of Alzheimer's disease (control subjects, CS) with basic tests of cognitive function, as well as actigraphy measures of sleep-wake rhythm, cardiac autonomic function, and bodily temperature. Unexpectedly, O-LOAD displayed subtle but significant deficits in verbal episodic memory (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed recall 10.6 +/- 0.4 vs. 8.6 +/- 0.6, t = 4.97, df = 49, p < 0.01) and language (Weschler's vocabulary 51.4 +/- 1.3 vs. 44.3 +/- 1.5, t = 2.49, df = 49, p < 0.001) compared to CS, even though all participants had results within the clinically normal range. O-LOAD showed a phase-delayed rhythm of body temperature (2.56 +/- 0.47 h vs. 3.8 +/- 0.26 h, t = 2.48, df = 40, p = 0.031). Cognitive performance in O-LOAD was associated with a series of cardiac autonomic sleep-wake variables; specifically indicators of greater sympathetic activity at night were related to poorer cognition. The present results suggest sleep pattern deserves further study as a potential neurobiological signature in LOAD, even in middle-aged, at risk individuals.

  • 4.
    Adawi, Rahim
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Preventing fatal effects of overworking: Product design solution2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “Overworking to death” is a phenomenon that has been noticeable in developing countries. The cause of death is mainly through ischemic strokes. While the victims’ occupations differed, they all shared a common characteristic, being positioned in a sedentary work, ranging from IT workers to doctors. This project’s aim was to develop a product that prevented or decreased the strokes that derived from sedentary overwork. This was mainly tackled by preventing one of the three causes of developing blood props, slowed blood flow. In order to gather rich data of the phenomenon, a qualitative study was conducted in China, during two months. By doing an extensive structured sampling, information rich data could be gathered during a short period of time. Data were derived from observations, questionnaires and an interview, which then was interpreted to customer needs and the final product specification. The final product became a trouser with an in built dynamic compression mechanic, that can compress the veins mostly during sitting activities, in order to prevent blood stasis. The compression mechanic works like the Chinese finger trap; compressing the calves while sitting and stretching the legs forward. It is made only out of polysaccharides fibres; cotton and corn.

  • 5.
    Ahmadi, Nasser S.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bennet, Louise
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Family Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Larsson, Charlotte A.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden / Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Social Medicine and Global Health, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Andersson, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Månsson, Jörgen
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, SwedenDepartment of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Ulf
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Clinical characteristics of asymptomatic left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and its association with self-rated health and N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide: a cross-sectional study2016In: ESC Heart Failure, E-ISSN 2055-5822, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsLeft ventricular hypertrophy, obesity, hypertension, and N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP) predict left ventricular diastolic dysfunction with preserved systolic function (DD-PSF). Self-rated health (SRH) is shown to be associated with chronic diseases, but the association of SRH with DD-PSF is unclear. In light of the clinical implications of DD-PSF, the following goals are of considerable importance: (1) to determine the role of SRH in patients with DD-PSF in the general population and (2) to study the association between Nt-proBNP and DD-PSF.

    Methods and resultsThe current study is a cross-sectional study conducted on a random sampling of a rural population. Individuals 30–75 years of age were consecutively subjected to conventional echocardiography and tissue velocity imaging. Data were collected on 500 (48%) men and 538 (52%) women (n = 1038). DD-PSF was the main outcome, and SRH and Nt-proBNP were the primary indicators. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obesity were accounted for as major confounders of the association with SRH. DD-PSF was identified in 137 individuals, namely, 79 men (15.8%) and 58 women (10.8%). In a multivariate regression model, SRH (OR 2.95; 95% CI 1.02–8.57) and Nt-proBNP (quartile 4 vs. quartile 1 OR 4.23; 95% CI 1.74–10.26) were both independently associated with DD-PSF.

    ConclusionsSRH, evaluated based on a descriptive question on general health, should be included in the diagnostic process of DD-PSF. In agreement with previous studies, our study confirms that Nt-proBNP is a major indicator of DD-PSF.

  • 6.
    Ali, Abukar
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Time window of TNF-a in innate immunity against staphylococcal infection2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is responsible for many human diseases including septic arthritis and sepsis shock. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in inflammation and produced mainly by macrophages and monocytes. It is believed to be involved in pathogenesis of septic arthritis. Time window of TNF-a in innate immunity against staphylococcal infection was studied in this project.

    Two experiments were carried out: In the first experiment mice were infected with a low dose (8x106cfu/mouse) of S. aureus to induce septic arthritis whereas in the second experiment the mice were infected with a higher dose (8x107cfu/mouse) of S. aureus to induce sepsis shock. All mice were divided into three groups. The first group was treated with anti-TNF-α 20 minutes after infection. The second group was treated with the anti-TNF-α three days after infection. The third group served as control and was injected with PBS instead of anti-TNF-α. The mice were regularly weighed and signs of arthritis and mortality were recorded. Two weeks after inoculation bacteria viable counts in different organs was done, as well as histopathological assessment of joints and measurement of cytokines in blood.

    We have observed that mice treated with anti-TNF-α had less severe arthritis and also less mortality. However, they had more bacteria accumulated in the kidneys and lost more weight compared to the control group. The results were mostly seen in the group early treated with TNF-α, compared to the late treated group.

    We conclude that anti-TNF-α might be potentially used as a therapy against septic arthritis and sepsis shock. This should be combined with antibiotics to eliminate the bacteria while the anti-TNF-α reduces the severity of the inflammation and thus reduce the risk of permanent joint destruction and mortality. We can conclude that blocking TNF-α early on is essential in order to get the best results.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Karlsson, Veronika
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhattan, Sweden.
    Bennet, Louise
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Family Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fellbrant, Klas
    Family Medicine, Department of Primary Health Care, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hellgren, Margareta
    Institute of Medicine, Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Attitudes Regarding Participation in a Diabetes Screening Test among an Assyrian Immigrant Population in Sweden2016In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 1504530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immigrants from the Middle East have higher prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with native Swedes. The aim of the study was to describe and understand health beliefs in relation to T2D as well as attitudes regarding participation in a screening process in a local group of Assyrian immigrants living in Sweden. A qualitative and quantitative method was chosen in which 43 individuals participated in a health check-up and 13 agreed to be interviewed. Interviews were conducted, anthropometric measurements and blood tests were collected, and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. In total, 13 of the 43 participants were diagnosed with impaired glucose metabolism, 4 of these 13 had TD2. The interviewed participants perceived that screening was an opportunity to discover more about their health and to care for themselves and their families. Nevertheless, they were not necessarily committed to taking action as a consequence of the screening. Instead, they professed that their health was not solely in their own hands and that they felt safe that God would provide for them. Assyrians' background and religion affect their health beliefs and willingness to participate in screening for TD2.

  • 8.
    Arnoldussen, Ilse A. C.
    et al.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Sundh, Valter
    Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bäckman, Kristoffer
    Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kern, Silke
    Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Östling, Svante
    Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skoog, Ingmar
    Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kiliaan, Amanda J.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA / Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older2018In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 1325-1335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adiposity measured in mid-or late-life and estimated using anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or metabolic markers such as blood leptin and adiponectin levels, is associated with late-onset dementia risk. However, during later life, this association may reverse and aging- and dementia-related processes may differentially affect adiposity measures.

    Objective: We explored associations of concurrent BMI, WHR, and blood leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin levels with dementia occurrence.

    Methods: 924 Swedish community-dwelling elderly without dementia, aged 70 years and older, systematically-sampled by birth day and birth year population-based in the Gothenburg city region of Sweden. The Gothenburg Birth Cohort Studies are designed for evaluating risk and protective factors for dementia. All dementias diagnosed after age 70 for 10 years were identified. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict dementia occurrence between 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2000-2010 after excluding prevalent baseline (year 2000) dementias. Baseline levels of BMI, WHR, leptin, and adiponectin were used.

    Results: Within 5 years of baseline, low BMI (<20 kg/m(2)) was associated with higher odds of dementia compared to those in the healthy BMI category (>= 20-24.9 kg/m(2)). Compared to the lowest quartile, leptin levels in the second quartile were associated with lower odds of dementia in women (p < 0.05).

    Conclusion: In late-life, anthropometric and metabolic adiposity measures appear to be differentially associated with dementia risk. While BMI and leptin levels are highly positively correlated, our results show that their association with dementia at age >= 70 years, is asynchronous. These data suggest that with aging, the complexity of the adiposity exposure may increase and suggests metabolic dysregulation. Additional studies are needed to better understand this complexity.

  • 9.
    Awe, Julius Adebayo
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada / Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Saranchuk, Jeff
    Department of Surgery, Manitoba Prostate Center, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Drachenberg, Darrel
    Department of Surgery, Manitoba Prostate Center, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Mai, Sabine
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Filtration-based enrichment of circulating tumor cells from all prostate cancer risk groups2017In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 300-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To combine circulating tumor cell (CTC) isolation by filtration and immunohistochemistry to investigate the presence of CTCs in low, intermediate, and high-risk prostate cancer (PCa). CTCs isolated from these risk groups stained positive for both cytokeratin and androgen receptors, but negative for CD45.

    Patients and methods: Blood samples from 41 biopsy confirmed patients with PCa at different clinical stages such as low, intermediate, and high risk were analyzed. The samples were processed with the ScreenCell filtration device and PCa CTCs were captured for all patients. The isolated CTCs were confirmed PCa CTCs by the presence of androgen receptors and cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19 that occurred in the absence of CD45 positivity. PCa CTC nuclear sizes were measured using the TeloView program.

    Results: The filtration-based isolation method used permitted the measurement of the average nuclear size of the captured CTCs. CTCs were identified by immunohistochemistry in low, intermediate, and high-risk groups of patients with PCa.

    Conclusion: CTCs may be found in all stages of PCa. These CTCs can be used to determine the level of genomic instability at any stage of PCa; this will, in the future, enable personalized patient management. 

  • 10.
    Axelsson, K. F.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, R.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, M.
    Geriatric Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effectiveness of a minimal resource fracture liaison service2016In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 3165-3175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate if a 2-year intervention with a minimal resource fracture liaison service (FLS) was associated with increased investigation and medical treatment and if treatment was related to reduced re-fracture risk.

    METHODS: The FLS started in 2013 using existing secretaries (without an FLS coordinator) at the emergency department and orthopaedic wards to identify risk patients. All patients older than 50 years of age with a fractured hip, vertebra, shoulder, wrist or pelvis were followed during 2013-2014 (n = 2713) and compared with their historic counterparts in 2011-2012 (n = 2616) at the same hospital. Re-fractures were X-ray verified. A time-dependent adjusted (for age, sex, previous fracture, index fracture type, prevalent treatment, comorbidity and secondary osteoporosis) Cox model was used.

    RESULTS: The minimal resource FLS increased the proportion of DXA-investigated patients after fracture from 7.6 to 39.6 % (p < 0.001) and the treatment rate after fracture from 12.6 to 31.8 %, which is well in line with FLS types using the conventional coordinator model. Treated patients had a 51 % lower risk of any re-fracture than untreated patients (HR 0.49, 95 % CI 0.37-0.65 p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: We found that our minimal resource FLS was effective in increasing investigation and treatment, in line with conventional coordinator-based services, and that treated patients had a 51 % reduced risk of new fractures, indicating that also non-coordinator based fracture liaison services can improve secondary prevention of fractures.

  • 11.
    Axelsson, K. F.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wallander, M.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, H.
    Institute for Health and Ageing, Catholic University of Australia, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, M.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and ClinicalNutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Hip fracture risk and safety with alendronate treatment in the oldest-old2017In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 282, no 6, p. 546-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. There is high evidence for secondary prevention of fractures, including hip fracture, with alendronate treatment, but alendronate's efficacy to prevent hip fractures in the oldest-old (80 years old), the population with the highest fracture risk, has not been studied. Objective. To investigate whether alendronate treatment amongst the oldest-old with prior fracture was related to decreased hip fracture rate and sustained safety. Methods. Using a national database of men and women undergoing a fall risk assessment at a Swedish healthcare facility, we identified 90 795 patients who were 80 years or older and had a prior fracture. Propensity score matching (four to one) was then used to identify 7844 controls to 1961 alendronate-treated patients. The risk of incident hip fracture was investigated with Cox models and the interaction between age and treatment was investigated using an interaction term. Results. The case and control groups were well balanced in regard to age, sex, anthropometrics and comorbidity. Alendronate treatment was associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture in crude (hazard ratio (HR) 0.62 (0.49-0.79), P < 0.001) and multivariable models (HR 0.66 (0.51-0.86), P < 0.01). Alendronate was related to reduced mortality risk (HR 0.88 (0.82-0.95) but increased risk of mild upper gastrointestinal symptoms (UGI) (HR 1.58 (1.12-2.24). The alendronate association did not change with age for hip fractures or mild UGI. Conclusion. In old patients with prior fracture, alendronate treatment reduces the risk of hip fracture with sustained safety, indicating that this treatment should be considered in these high-risk patients.

  • 12.
    Axelsson, Kristian F.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anna G.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wedel, Hans
    Health Metrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Association between alendronate use and hip fracture risk in older patients using oral prednisolone2017In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 318, no 2, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance  Oral glucocorticoid treatment increases fracture risk, and evidence is lacking regarding the efficacy of alendronate to protect against hip fracture in older patients using glucocorticoids.Objective  To investigate whether alendronate treatment in older patients using oral prednisolone is associated with decreased hip fracture risk and adverse effects.Design, Setting, and Participants  Retrospective cohort study using a national database (N = 433 195) of patients aged 65 years or older undergoing a health evaluation (baseline) at Swedish health care facilities; 1802 patients who were prescribed alendronate after at least 3 months of oral prednisolone treatment (≥5 mg/d) were identified. Propensity score matching was used to select 1802 patients without alendronate use from 6076 patients taking prednisolone with the same dose and treatment time criteria. Follow-up occurred between January 2008 and December 2014.Exposures  Alendronate vs no alendronate use; no patients had previously taken alendronate at the time of prednisolone initiation.Main Outcomes and Measures  The primary outcome was incident hip fracture.Results  Of the 3604 included patients, the mean age was 79.9 (SD, 7.5) years, and 2524 (70%) were women. After a median follow-up of 1.32 years (interquartile range, 0.57-2.34 years), there were 27 hip fractures in the alendronate group and 73 in the no-alendronate group, corresponding to incidence rates of 9.5 (95% CI, 6.5-13.9) and 27.2 (95% CI, 21.6-34.2) fractures per 1000 person-years, with an absolute rate difference of −17.6 (95% CI, −24.8 to −10.4). The use of alendronate was associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in a multivariable-adjusted Cox model (hazard ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.22-0.54). Alendronate treatment was not associated with increased risk of mild upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms (alendronate vs no alendronate, 15.6 [95% CI, 11.6-21.0] vs 12.9 [95% CI, 9.3-18.0] per 1000 person-years; P = .40) or peptic ulcers (10.9 [95% CI, 7.7-15.5] vs 11.4 [95% CI, 8.0-16.2] per 1000 person-years; P = .86). There were no cases of incident drug-induced osteonecrosis and only 1 case of femoral shaft fracture in each group.Conclusions and Relevance  Among older patients using medium to high doses of prednisolone, alendronate treatment was associated with a significantly lower risk of hip fracture over a median of 1.32 years. Although the findings are limited by the observational study design and the small number of events, these results support the use of alendronate in this patient group.

  • 13.
    Axelsson, Kristian F.
    et al.
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Werling, Malin
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Szabo, Eva
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Näslund, Ingmar
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Wedel, Hans
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Fracture risk after gastric bypass surgery – a retrospective cohort study2018In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 2122-2131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastric bypass surgery constitutes the most common and effective bariatric surgery to treat obesity. Gastric bypass leads to bone loss, but fracture risk following surgery has been insufficiently studied. Furthermore, the association between gastric bypass and fracture risk has not been studied in patients with diabetes, which is a risk factor for fracture and affected by surgery. In this retrospective cohort study using Swedish national databases, 38 971 obese patients undergoing gastric bypass were identified, 7758 with diabetes and 31 213 without. An equal amount of well-balanced controls were identified through multivariable 1:1 propensity score matching. The risk of fracture and fall injury was investigated using Cox proportional hazards and flexible parameter models. Fracture risk according to weight loss and degree of calcium and vitamin D supplementation one-year post- surgery was investigated. During a median follow-up time of 3.1 (IQR 1.7-4.6) years, gastric bypass was associated with increased risk of any fracture, in patients with and without diabetes using a multivariable Cox model (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.05- 1.53 and HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18-1.47, respectively). Using flexible parameter models, the fracture risk appeared to increase with time. The risk of fall injury without fracture was also increased after gastric bypass. Larger weight loss or poor calcium and vitamin D supplementation after surgery were not associated with increased fracture risk. In conclusion, gastric bypass surgery is associated with an increased fracture risk, which appears to be increasing with time and not associated with degree of weight loss or calcium and vitamin D supplementation following surgery. An increased risk of fall injury was seen after surgery, which could contribute to the increased fracture risk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Ayukekbong, James A.
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, M. E.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vansarla, Goutham
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Tah, F.
    Camyaids Institute of Laboratory Diagnosis and Clinical Research, Douala, Cameroon.
    Nkuo-Akenji, T.
    Faculty of Science Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon.
    Lindh, M.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergström, T.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Monitoring of seasonality of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon by real-time PCR: an exploratory study2014In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 142, no 7, p. 1393-1402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the seasonal fluctuation of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon. Two hundred participants aged between 1 and 69 years were prospectively followed up. Each participant provided monthly faecal samples over a 12-month period. A total of 2484 samples were tested using multiplex real-time PCR assay for the detection of norovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus. The effect of weather variables and risk factors were analysed by Pearson correlation and bivariate analysis. Overall, enterovirus was the most commonly detected virus (216% of specimens), followed by norovirus (39%) and rotavirus (04%). Norovirus and enterovirus were detected throughout the year with a peak of norovirus detection at the beginning of the rainy season and a significant alternation of circulation of norovirus genogroups from one month to the next. Age <5 years and consumption of tap water were risk factors for norovirus infection. Better understanding of factors influencing transmission and seasonality may provide insights into the relationship between physical environment and risk of infection for these viruses.

  • 15.
    Bachelet, Delphine
    et al.
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France.
    Albert, Thilo
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Germany.
    Mbogning, Cyprien
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France.
    Hässler, Signe
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France.
    Zhang, Yuan
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France.
    Schultze-Strasser, Stephan
    University Hospital Frankfurt, Goethe University, Department of Pediatrics, Molecular Haemostasis and Immunodeficiency, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Repessé, Yohann
    CHU Caen, Hématologie Biologique, Caen, Caen, France.
    Rayes, Julie
    Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR_S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
    Pavlova, Anna
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Pezeshkpoor, Behnaz
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Liphardt, Kerstin
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Davidson, Julie E.
    GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, Middlesex, United Kingdom.
    Hincelin-Méry, Agnès
    Sanofi, Chilly-Mazarin, France.
    Dönnes, Pierre
    SciCross AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien
    Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR_S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
    Königs, Christoph
    University Hospital Frankfurt, Goethe University, Department of Pediatrics, Molecular Haemostasis and Immunodeficiency, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Oldenburg, Johannes
    Institute of Experimental Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, University Clinic Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Broët, Philippe
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, UVSQ, Paris-Saclay University, Villejuif, France / AP-HP, Paris-Sud University Hospitals, Villejuif, France.
    Risk stratification integrating genetic data for factor VIII inhibitor development in patients with severe hemophilia A2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 6, article id e0218258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Replacement therapy in severe hemophilia A leads to factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors in 30% of patients. Factor VIII gene (F8) mutation type, a family history of inhibitors, ethnicity and intensity of treatment are established risk factors, and were included in two published prediction tools based on regression models. Recently investigated immune regulatory genes could also play a part in immunogenicity. Our objective is to identify bio-clinical and genetic markers for FVIII inhibitor development, taking into account potential genetic high order interactions. The study population consisted of 593 and 79 patients with hemophilia A from centers in Bonn and Frankfurt respectively. Data was collected in the European ABIRISK tranSMART database. A subset of 125 severely affected patients from Bonn with reliable information on first treatment was selected as eligible for risk stratification using a hybrid tree-based regression model (GPLTR). In the eligible subset, 58 (46%) patients developed FVIII inhibitors. Among them, 49 (84%) were "high risk" F8 mutation type. 19 (33%) had a family history of inhibitors. The GPLTR model, taking into account F8 mutation risk, family history of inhibitors and product type, distinguishes two groups of patients: a high-risk group for immunogenicity, including patients with positive HLA-DRB1*15 and genotype G/A and A/A for IL-10 rs1800896, and a low-risk group of patients with negative HLA-DRB1*15 / HLA-DQB1*02 and T/T or G/T for CD86 rs2681401. We show associations between genetic factors and the occurrence of FVIII inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A patients taking into account for high-order interactions using a generalized partially linear tree-based approach.

  • 16.
    Bays, Harold E.
    et al.
    Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center Inc., Louisville, KY, USA.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Global Medicines Development, CVMD, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Xu, John
    Biometrics and Information Sciences, AstraZeneca, Gaithersburg, MD, USA.
    Sjöström, Carl David
    Global Medicines Development, CVMD, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Underberg, James A.
    Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine & NYU Center for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, New York, NY, USA.
    Dapagliflozin in patients with type II diabetes mellitus, with and without elevated triglyceride and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels2017In: Journal of Clinical Lipidology, ISSN 1933-2874, E-ISSN 1876-4789, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 450-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dapagliflozin is a selective sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that improves glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by reducing renal glucose reabsorption.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the lipid effects of dapagliflozin 10 mg or placebo in patients with T2DM with/without baseline elevated triglyceride and reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels.

    METHODS: This was a post hoc analysis of 10 phase 3, placebo-controlled studies of dapagliflozin 10 mg (N = 2237) or placebo (N = 2164) administered for 24 weeks in patients with T2DM. Patients with elevated triglyceride (>= 150 mg/dL [1.69 mmol/L]) and reduced HDL cholesterol levels (<40 mg/dL [1.04 mmol/L] in men; <50 mg/dL [1.29 mmol/L] in women) were included (group A). The reference group (group B) included patients who did not meet the defined lipid criteria.

    RESULTS: The effects of dapagliflozin on fasting lipid profiles were generally similar in the 2 lipid groups (ie, groups A and B) and, compared with placebo, were associated with minor increases in non-HDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and HDL cholesterol levels. The effects on triglyceride levels were inconsistent. The incidence of adverse events (AEs)/serious AEs, and AEs of genital infection, urinary tract infection, volume reduction, renal function, and hypoglycemia were similar in the 2 lipid groups.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with T2DM treated with dapagliflozin experienced minor changes in lipid levels; the changes were generally similar in the 2 lipid groups. The clinical significance of these changes in lipids is unclear, especially in view of the positive effects of dapagliflozin on other cardiovascular disease risk factors. 

  • 17.
    Behnsen, Pia
    et al.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Buil, Joanne M.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Koot, Susanne
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Van Lier, Poul
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Heart rate (variability) and the association between relational peer victimization and internalizing symptoms in elementary school children2019In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, p. 1-9, article id 29 aprilArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relational victimization typically emerges first during the elementary school period, and has been associated with increased levels of internalizing symptoms in children. Individual differences in autonomic nervous system functioning have been suggested as a potential factor linking social stressors and internalizing symptoms. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether heart rate and heart rate variability mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms in 373 mainstream elementary school children. Children were assessed in 2015 (T 0 ; Grades 3-5, M age = 9.78 years, 51% boys) and reassessed in 2016 (T 1 ). Heart rate and heart rate variability were assessed during a regular school day at T 1 . A multi-informant (teacher and peer report) cross-time measure of relational victimization, and a multi-informant (self- and teacher report) measure of internalizing problems at T 1 was used. Results showed that heart rate variability, but not heart rate, mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms. This study provides tentative support that in children from a general population sample, a psychobiological factor may mediate the association of relational victimization with internalizing symptoms.

  • 18.
    Bennet, Sean M. P.
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Böhn, Lena
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Störsrud, Stine
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Liljebo, Therese
    Department of Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Collin, Lena
    Department of Gastroenterology, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindfors, Perjohan
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Gastroenterology, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Törnblom, Hans
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Multivariate modelling of faecal bacterial profiles of patients with IBS predicts responsiveness to a diet low in FODMAPs2018In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 872-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The effects of dietary interventions on gut bacteria are ambiguous. Following a previous intervention study, we aimed to determine how differing diets impact gut bacteria and if bacterial profiles predict intervention response. Design Sixty-seven patients with IBS were randomised to traditional IBS (n=34) or low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) (n=33) diets for 4 weeks. Food intake was recorded for 4 days during screening and intervention. Faecal samples and IBS Symptom Severity Score (IBS-SSS) reports were collected before (baseline) and after intervention. A faecal microbiota dysbiosis test (GA-map Dysbiosis Test) evaluated bacterial composition. Per protocol analysis was performed on 61 patients from whom microbiome data were available. Results Responders (reduced IBS-SSS by >= 50) to low FODMAP, but not traditional, dietary intervention were discriminated from non-responders before and after intervention based on faecal bacterial profiles. Bacterial abundance tended to be higher in non-responders to a low FODMAP diet compared with responders before and after intervention. A low FODMAP intervention was associated with an increase in Dysbiosis Index (DI) scores in 42% of patients; while decreased DI scores were recorded in 33% of patients following a traditional IBS diet. Non-responders to a low FODMAP diet, but not a traditional IBS diet had higher DI scores than responders at baseline. Finally, while a traditional IBS diet was not associated with significant reduction of investigated bacteria, a low FODMAP diet was associated with reduced Bifidobacterium and Actinobacteria in patients, correlating with lactose consumption. Conclusions A low FODMAP, but not a traditional IBS diet may have significant impact on faecal bacteria. Responsiveness to a low FODMAP diet intervention may be predicted by faecal bacterial profiles.

  • 19.
    Bennet, Sean M. P.
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Polster, Annikka
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Törnblom, Hans
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Stefan
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Capronnier, Sandrine
    Department of Life Science, Danone Nutricia Research, Palaiseau, France.
    Tessier, Aurore
    Department of Life Science, Danone Nutricia Research, Palaiseau, France.
    Le Nevé, Boris
    Department of Life Science, Danone Nutricia Research, Palaiseau, France.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Global Cytokine Profiles and Association With Clinical Characteristics in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome2016In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 111, no 8, p. 1165-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Evidence suggests that patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have an altered cytokine profile, although it is unclear whether cytokines are linked with symptom severity. We aimed to determine whether global serum and mucosal cytokine profiles differ between IBS patients and healthy subjects and whether cytokines are associated with IBS symptoms.

    METHODS: Serum from 144 IBS patients and 42 healthy subjects was analyzed for cytokine levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17A, interferon (IFN)-γ, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by MSD MULTI-ARRAY. In total, 109 IBS and 36 healthy sigmoid colon biopsies were analyzed for mRNA expression of IL-8, IL-10, TNF, and FOXP3 by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Multivariate discrimination analysis evaluated global cytokine profiles. Rectal sensitivity, oroanal transit time, and psychological and gastrointestinal symptom severity were also assessed.

    RESULTS: Global cytokine profiles of IBS patients and healthy subjects overlapped, but cytokine levels varied more in IBS patients. Serum levels of IL-6 and IL-8 tended to be increased and levels of IFN-γ tended to be decreased in IBS patients. Mucosal mRNA expression of IL-10 and FOXP3 tended to be decreased in IBS patients. Within both the full study cohort and IBS patients alone, serum level of TNF was associated with looser stool pattern, while subjects with more widespread somatic symptoms had increased serum levels of IL-6. Although neither IBS bowel habit subgroups nor patients with possible post-infectious IBS were associated with distinct cytokine profiles, a small cluster of IBS patients with comparatively elevated immune markers was identified.

    CONCLUSIONS: Global cytokine profiles did not discriminate IBS patients from healthy subjects, but cytokine profiles were more varied among IBS patients than among healthy subjects, and a small subgroup of patients with enhanced immune activity was identified. Also, association of inflammatory cytokines with some clinical symptoms suggests that immune activation may be of importance in a subset of IBS patients.

  • 20.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Magnus
    Department of Linguistics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Allwood, Jens
    Department of Linguistics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Odén, Anders
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Steen, Bertil
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Descriptions of pain in elderly patients following orthopaedic surgery2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 110-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to investigate what words elderly patients, who had undergone hip surgery, used to describe their experience of pain in spoken language and to compare these words with those used in the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and Pain-O-Meter (POM). The study was carried out at two orthopaedic and two geriatric clinical departments at a large university hospital in Sweden. Altogether, 60 patients (mean age =77) who had undergone orthopaedic surgery took part in the study. A face-to-face interview was conducted with each patient on the second day after the operation. This was divided into two parts, one tape-recorded and semi-structured in character and one structured interview. The results show that a majority of the elderly patients who participated in this study verbally stated pain and spontaneously used a majority of the words found in the SF-MPQ and in the POM. The patients also used a number of additional words not found in the SF-MPQ or the POM. Among those patients who did not use any of the words in the SF-MPQ and the POM, the use of the three additional words 'stel' (stiff), 'hemsk' (awful) and 'räd(d)(sla)' (afraid/fear) were especially marked. The patients also combined the words with a negation to describe what pain was not. To achieve a more balanced and nuanced description of the patient's pain and to make it easier for the patients to talk about their pain, there is a need for access to a set of predefined words that describe pain from a more multidimensional perspective than just intensity. If the elderly patient is allowed, and finds it necessary, to use his/her own words to describe what pain is but also to describe what pain is not, by combining the words with a negation, then the risk of the patient being forced to choose words that do not fully correspond to their pain can be reduced. If so, pain scales such as the SF-MPQ and the POM can create a communicative bridge between the elderly patient and health care professionals in the pain evaluation process.

  • 21.
    Bergh, Ingrid H. E.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Johansson, Anna
    Univ Hosp Örebro, Dept Obstet, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bratt, Annelie
    Skaraborgs Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Assessment and documentation of women's labour pain: A cross-sectional study in Swedish delivery wards2015In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 28, no 2, p. E14-E18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A woman's pain during labour plays a dominant role in childbirth. The midwife's role is to assess the degree of pain experienced during labour. When professionals respond to labour pain with acknowledgement and understanding, the woman's sense of control and empowerment is increased, which could contribute to a positive experience of childbirth. The aim of this study is to describe how labour pain in Swedish delivery wards is assessed and documented. Methods: This quantitative descriptive study was designed as a national survey performed through telephone interviews with the representatives of 34 delivery wards in Sweden. Results and conclusion: The majority of the participating delivery wards assessed and documented women's labour pain, but in an unstructured manner. The wards differed in how the assessments and documentation were performed. In addition, almost all the delivery wards that participated in the survey lacked guidelines for the assessment and documentation of the degree of pain during labour. The findings also showed that the issue of labour pain was sometimes discussed in the delivery wards, but not in a structured or consistent way. (C) 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Australia (a division of Reed International Books Australia Pty Ltd). All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Vasa Hospital, Göteborg.
    Sjöström, Björn
    Department of Health Care Pedagogics, Göteborg University, Göteborg.
    Odén, Anders
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Vasa Hospital, Göteborg.
    Steen, Bertil
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Vasa Hospital, Göteborg.
    An application of pain rating scales in geriatric patients2000In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 380-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the applicability of three different pain rating scales, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Graphic Rating Scale (GRS) and the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), in geriatric patients. Data collection was performed in a geriatric clinic at a university hospital. A structured interview was conducted with 167 patients (mean age = 80.5 years). Patients rated their current experience of pain twice with a 5-minute pause in-between on the VAS, GRS and NRS, and were then asked if they experienced pain, ache or hurt (PAH) or other symptoms. The correlations were high and significant both between the ratings of the VAS, GRS and NRS (r = 0.78-0.92; p < 0.001) (alternative-forms reliability), and between the test and retesting (r = 0.75-r = 0.83; p < 0.001) (test-retest reliability). A logistic regression analysis showed that the probability to accomplish a rating on the pain scales decreased with advancing age of the patient, and this was especially marked for the VAS. The probability of agreement between the patients' ratings of pain and the verbal report of PAH tended to decrease with advancing age; this was especially so for the VAS. Patients who verbally denied PAH but reported pain on the scales rated it significant lower (p < 0.001) than those who verbally reported PAH and rated the pain as well. Eighteen percent of patients who denied pain but rated a pain experience verbally expressed suffering or distress. The study suggests that pain rating scales such as the VAS, GRS and NRS can be used to evaluate pain experience in geriatric patients. However, agreement between verbally expressed experience of PAH, and the rated experience of pain tended to decrease with advancing age. This indicates that the pain-evaluating process will be substantially improved by an additional penetration supported by a wide variety of expression of hurt, ache, pain, discomfort and distress.

  • 23.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University.
    Sjöström, Björn
    University of Skövde, Department of Health Sciences.
    Odén, Anders
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University.
    Steen, Bertil
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University.
    Assessing pain and pain relief in geriatric patients with non-pathological fractures with different rating scales2001In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 355-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although pain is a frequent problem among elderly patients, they are often omitted in clinical trials and few studies have focused on assessing pain relief in this population. The aim of this study was to compare geriatric patients' verbally reported effect of analgesics with changes in pain experience rated with four different rating scales: the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Graphic Rating Scale (GRS), the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and the Pain Relief Scale (PRS). Altogether 53 geriatric patients (mean=82 yrs) with non-pathological fractures in 4 geriatric units at a large university hospital were selected. In connection with the administration of analgesics, the patients were asked to "Mark the point that corresponds to your experience of pain just now at rest" on the VAS, GRS and NRS. This was repeated after 1.5-2 hours, and a direct question was asked about whether the analgesic medication given in connection with the initial assessment had had any pain-alleviation effect. Two comparisons were conducted with each patient. The results show that the probability of accomplishing a rating on the VAS, GRS, NRS, and PRS was lower with advancing age in these elderly fracture patients. The correlations between the ratings of the VAS, GRS and NRS were strong and significant (r=0.80-0.95; p<0.001) both at the initial assessments and at the re-assessments. However, the verbally reported effects of the analgesics were often directly opposite to the changes in rated pain. Therefore, application of the VAS, NRS, GRS and PRS for the purpose of assessing pain relief must be combined with supplementary questions that allow the patient to verbally describe possible experience of pain relief.

  • 24.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Steen, Gunilla
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Waern, Magda
    Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Johansson, Boo
    Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Odén, Anders
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Sjöström, Björn
    University of Skövde, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Health Care Pedagogics, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Steen, Bertil
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Pain and its relation to cognitive function and depressive symptoms: A Swedish population study of 70-year-old men and women2003In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 903-912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of pain and its characteristics, and to examine the association of pain with cognitive function and depressive symptoms, in a representative sample of 70-year-old men and women. Data were collected within the gerontological and geriatric population studies in Göteborg, Sweden (H-70). A sample of 124 men and 117 women living in the community took part in the study. A questionnaire was applied which included four different aspects of pain experience: prevalence, frequency of episodes of pain, duration and number of locations. In close connection to this, depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. The prevalence of pain during the last 14 days was higher in women (79%; n = 91) than in men (53%; n = 65) (P<0.001). Women (68%; n = 78) also reported pain that had lasted for >6 months to a greater extent than men (38%; n = 46) (P<0.001). The frequency of episodes of pain was also higher among women, 64% (n = 74) reporting daily pain or pain several days during the last 14 days while 37% of the men (n = 45) did so (P<0.001). Women (33%, n = 38) also reported pain experience from ≥3 locations more often than men (11%; n = 13) (P<0.001). On the other hand, the association between depressive symptoms and pain experience was more evident in men than in women. Women were taking significantly more antidepressants compared to men (P<0.03). The results show that pain is common in 70-year-old people and especially in women. However, associations between depressive symptoms and the four aspects of pain experience were more pronounced among men. 

  • 25.
    Bharadwaj, Mausumi
    et al.
    Division of Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), NOIDA, India.
    Hussain, Showket
    Division of Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), NOIDA, India.
    Tripathi, Richa
    Division of Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), NOIDA, India.
    Singh, Neha
    Department of Biotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
    Mehrotra, Ravi
    Division of Cytopathology, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), NOIDA, India.
    Human Papillomavirus (HPV): Diagnosis and Treatment2014In: Animal Biotechnology: Models in Discovery and Translation / [ed] Ashish Verma & Anchal Singh, Elsevier, 2014, p. 95-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Bjerkeli, Pernilla J.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Clinical Sciences, Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Vicente, Raquel Perez
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Mulinari, Shai
    Department of Sociology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johnell, Kristina
    Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Merlo, Juan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden / Center for Primary Health Care Research, Region Skåne, Malmö, Sweden.
    Overuse of methylphenidate: an analysis of Swedish pharmacy dispensing data2018In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 10, p. 1657-1665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To identify overuse of methylphenidate and to investigate patterns of overuse in relation to sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Patients and methods: Swedish national, pharmacy dispensing data were analyzed for all 56,922 individuals aged 6-79 years, who filled a methylphenidate prescription between 2010 and 2011. Overuse was defined as having above 150% days covered by the dispensed amount during 365 days from the first prescription fill, assuming use at the maximum recommended daily dose. Results: In total, 4,304 individuals (7.6% of the methylphenidate users) were categorized as overusers. The risk of overuse increased with age (OR for 46-65 years vs 6-12 years 17.5, 95% CI 14.3-21.3), and was higher in men (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.5) and individuals with low income (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2), as well as in individuals with an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.6), health care visits (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.4), previous ADHD medication use (OR 2.6, 95% CI 2.4-2.8), and previous diagnosis of mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (OR 2.1 95% CI 2.0-2.3). Conclusion: Among individuals using methylphenidate in Sweden, 7.6% receive amounts that are larger than what they should have a medical need for, assuming that they were using the maximum recommended daily dose 365 days per year. Notably, the prevalence of overuse was associated with previous diagnosis of alcohol and drug misuse. The prevalence was also positively associated with higher age and previous use of ADHD medication. These findings may point toward a link between exposure time and overuse. However, future studies with long-term data are needed to investigate this.

  • 27.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University.
    Sigstedt, Bo
    Jönköping University.
    Enskär, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Children's experience of going through an acute radiographic examination2012In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s experience of radiographic examinations remains largely unexplored, although most radiographers examine children on a daily basis. In order to provide the high quality care that meets the needs of patients it was considered important to undertake research focused upon the patients’ experience of radiographic practice.

    The aim of the study was to investigate children’s experiences undergoing a radiographic examination for a suspected fracture.

    Inclusion criteria were Swedish-speaking children between 3 and 15 years of age who were submitted for a radiographic examination with an acute condition of the upper or lower extremity. Patients were informed of the study and together with the escorting parent or relative asked for consent to participate.

    During the examination the child was videotaped and immediately after, the child was interviewed in a nearby facility. The interview contained open-ended questions and was conducted while watching the videotape together with the child and their parent or relative and the researcher.

    Qualitative content analysis was used in analyzing the collected data. The analysis resulted in two categories - “feeling uncomfortable” and “feeling confident”. The subcategories contained in these categories were “pain in relation to injury and examination”, “the waiting time is strenuous”, “worries for the future and consequences of the injury”, “confidence in parental presence”, “confidence in radiographic staff and examination procedure”, and finally “recognition entails familiarity”.

    The results revealed that for the younger children, the experience of undergoing an acute radiographic examination was associated with pain and anxiety, but for the older children, the anxiety was more connected to whether the injury had caused a fracture and any anticipated future consequences or complications.

  • 28.
    Borgström, Juliana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Cyclical Women: Menstrual Cycle Effects on Mood and Neuro-Cognitive Performance2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During roughly forty years of a woman’s life-span, the fertile female human body prepares itself monthly for the possibility of pregnancy. Science has shown that the fluctuation of the sex steroids progesterone and estrogen have a crucial role in the female body's physiology, determining the menstrual cycle and its general phases. This biological dance of hormones governing the cycle influences a lot of physical, mental and cognitive aspects of life for a fertile ovulating woman. Although the question of whether these changes also affect women's cognitive performance is still unclear, some evidence has been gathered that could bring us closer to answers. Recent research findings show that this hormonal interplay might have a significant role in cognitive and psychological development - modulating brain activity, cognitive performance, higher cognition, emotional status, sensory processing, appetite and more. This thesis aims to uncover to what extent the menstrual cycle affects brain functions, neurobiology, mood, well-being and cognitive performance in menstruating cisgender women.

  • 29.
    Browall, Sarah
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Backhaus, Erik
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Naucler, Pontus
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Galanis, Ilias
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Karin
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Berg, Stefan
    Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Luthander, Joachim
    Department of Paediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Margareta
    Department of Paediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Spindler, Carl
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Ejdebäck, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Trollfors, Birger
    Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Darenberg, Jessica
    Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Kalin, Mats
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Örtqvist, Åke
    Department of Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medicine, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Andersson, Rune
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henriques-Normark, Birgitta
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Dept of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clinical manifestations of invasive pneumococcal disease by vaccine and non-vaccine types2014In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 1646-1657Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Carlsson, Jessica
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Davidsson, Sabina
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden / Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Helenius, Gisela
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Orebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Orebro, Sweden.
    Lubovac, Zelmina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Andren, Ove
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden .
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    A miRNA expression signature that separates between normal and malignant prostate tissues2011In: Cancer Cell International, ISSN 1475-2867, E-ISSN 1475-2867, Vol. 11, p. 14-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate genes involved in several key biological processes and thus are involved in various diseases, including cancer. In this study we aimed to identify a miRNA expression signature that could be used to separate between normal and malignant prostate tissues. Results: Nine miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed (p < 0.00001). With the exception of two samples, this expression signature could be used to separate between the normal and malignant tissues. A cross-validation procedure confirmed the generality of this expression signature. We also identified 16 miRNAs that possibly could be used as a complement to current methods for grading of prostate tumor tissues. Conclusions: We found an expression signature based on nine differentially expressed miRNAs that with high accuracy (85%) could classify the normal and malignant prostate tissues in patients from the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort. The results show that there are significant differences in miRNA expression between normal and malignant prostate tissue, indicating that these small RNA molecules might be important in the biogenesis of prostate cancer and potentially useful for clinical diagnosis of the disease.

  • 31.
    Carlström, Karl E.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ewing, Ewoud
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granqvist, Mathias
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gyllenberg, Alexandra
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aeinehband, Shahin
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enoksson, Sara Lind
    Department of Clinical Immunology Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Checa, Antonio
    Division of Physiological Chemistry II, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Badam, Tejaswi
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Physics, Chemistry & Biology (IFM), Bioinformatics, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Huang, Jesse
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gomez-Cabrero, David
    Translational Bioinformatics Unit, Navarrabiomed, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra (CHN), Universidad Publica de Nevarra (UPNA), IdiSNA, Pamplona, Spain.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Al Nimer, Faiez
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wheelock, Craig E.
    Division of Physiological Chemistry II, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jagodic, Maja
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Therapeutic efficacy of dimethyl fumarate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis associates with ROS pathway in monocytes2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-13, article id 3081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a first-line-treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The redox master regulator Nrf2, essential for redox balance, is a target of DMF, but its precise therapeutic mechanisms of action remain elusive. Here we show impact of DMF on circulating monocytes and T cells in a prospective longitudinal RRMS patient cohort. DMF increases the level of oxidized isoprostanes in peripheral blood. Other observed changes, including methylome and transcriptome profiles, occur in monocytes prior to T cells. Importantly, monocyte counts and monocytic ROS increase following DMF and distinguish patients with beneficial treatment-response from non-responders. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the ROS-generating NOX3 gene is associated with beneficial DMF treatment-response. Our data implicate monocyte-derived oxidative processes in autoimmune diseases and their treatment, and identify NOX3 genetic variant, monocyte counts and redox state as parameters potentially useful to inform clinical decisions on DMF therapy of RRMS.

  • 32.
    Carré, H.
    et al.
    Univ Hosp, Dept Publ Hlth, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden / Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Med, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden / Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol & Venerol, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden.
    Boman, J.
    Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol & Virol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Österlund, A.
    Sunderby Hosp, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gärden, Bodil
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nylander, E.
    Univ Hosp, Dept Publ Hlth, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden / Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Med, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden / Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol & Venerol, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden.
    Improved contact tracing for Chlamydia trachomatis with experienced tracers, tracing for one year back in time and interviewing by phone in remote areas2008In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, ISSN 1368-4973, E-ISSN 1472-3263, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 239-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the Swedish model for contact tracing and especiallythe "Västerbotten model" with centralised, extended contactinterview periods, sometimes by telephone.

    Methods: Using questionnaires, the contact tracing and interview procedurewas evaluated during 2002, followed by an evaluation of contactinterviewing by phone in 2005–6.

    Results: Patients with diagnosed Chlamydia trachomatis infection reportedon average 2.5 sexual contacts, 3.0 contacts when contact interviewingwas performed at the clinic, and 2.3 contacts when performedby phone. 65% of the sexual contacts with a known test resultwere infected.

    Conclusion: Centralised contact tracing, exploring the sexual history forat least 12 months back in time, shows good results. Combinedwith screening of certain risk groups it is probably one effectiveway of preventing C trachomatis infections. Preventing C trachomatisby primary prevention such as information and counselling is,however, still of great importance.

  • 33.
    Cedermark, Ulrika
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Förstagångsmammor, Amning och deras upplevelse av Amningsstöd2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The health benefits of breastfeeding are well documented and guidelines for infant feeding have supported exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months. The breastfeeding prevalence has decreased in Sweden during the last ten years. The aim with this study was to find out if primaparous mothers could breastfeed as long as they had planned to do, reasons for stopping breastfeeding and how the mothers had perceived breastfeeding support, especially the support from the child health care. A questionnaire was sent out to 65 primiparous women and 35 mothers participated in the study. Almost half of the mothers had stopped breastfeeding earlier than they wanted to do. The result showed that many mothers looked for support in their own social network. The support from antenatal care, delivery and maternity ward, child health care was important in initiating breastfeeding as well as to maintain breastfeeding. There is a need of more education in breastfeeding and breast milk to health professionals and breastfeeding supporters to be able to support those mothers who want to breastfeed their babies.

  • 34.
    Chaudhari, Aditi
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Wettergren, Yvonne
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra.
    Kahn, Ronald
    Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School, United States.
    Rotter Sopasakis, Victoria
    University of Gothenburg / Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School, United states.
    Hepatic deletion of p110α and p85α results in insulin resistance despite sustained IRS1-associated phosphatidylinositol kinase activity2017In: F1000 Research, E-ISSN 2046-1402, Vol. 6, article id 1600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Class IA phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) is an integral mediator of insulin signaling. The p110 catalytic and p85 regulatory subunits of PI3K are the products of separate genes, and while they come together to make the active heterodimer, they have opposing roles in insulin signaling and action. Deletion of hepatic p110α results in an impaired insulin signal and severe insulin resistance, whereas deletion of hepatic p85α results in improved insulin sensitivity due to sustained levels of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate. Here, we created mice with combined hepatic deletion of p110α and p85α (L-DKO) to study the impact on insulin signaling and whole body glucose homeostasis.Methods: Six-week old male flox control and L-DKO mice were studied over a period of 18 weeks, during which weight and glucose levels were monitored, and glucose tolerance tests, insulin tolerance test and pyruvate tolerance test were performed. Fasting insulin, insulin signaling mediators, PI3K activity and insulin receptor substrate (IRS)1-associated phosphatidylinositol kinase activity were examined at 10 weeks. Liver, muscle and white adipose tissue weight was recorded at 10 weeks and 25 weeks.Results: The L-DKO mice showed a blunted insulin signal downstream of PI3K, developed markedly impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia and had decreased liver and adipose tissue weights. Surprisingly, however, these mice displayed normal hepatic glucose production, normal insulin tolerance, and intact IRS1-associated phosphatidylinositol kinase activity without compensatory upregulated signaling of other classes of PI3K.Conclusions: The data demonstrate an unexpectedly overall mild metabolic phenotype of the L-DKO mice, suggesting that lipid kinases other than PI3Ks might partially compensate for the loss of p110α/p85α by signaling through other nodes than Akt/Protein Kinase B.

  • 35.
    Cuisset, J. M.
    et al.
    Service de Neuropédiatrie, Centre hospitalier régional universitaire et faculté de médecine, Lille, France.
    Maurage, C. A.
    Service d'Anatomie Pathologique, Centre hospitalier régional universitaire et faculté de médecine, Lille, France.
    Pellissier, J. F.
    Laboratoire de Biopathologie Neuromusculaire, JE 2053, Centre hospitalier universitaire et faculté de médecine de La Timone, Marseille, France.
    Barois, A.
    Service de réanimation pédiatrique, Hôpital Raymond-Poincaré, Garches, France.
    Urtizberea, J. A.
    Institut de Myologie, Hôpital Pitié-Salpétrière, Paris, France.
    Laing, N.
    Center for neuromuscular and neurological disorders, Australian neuromuscular research institute, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Tajsharghi, H
    Department of pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Vallée, L.
    Service de Neuropédiatrie, Centre hospitalier régional universitaire et faculté de médecine, Lille, France.
    'Cap myopathy': case report of a family2006In: Neuromuscular Disorders, ISSN 0960-8966, E-ISSN 1873-2364, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 277-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the observation of an 18-year-old girl, whose clinical presentation was very suggestive of a congenital myopathy with neonatal onset. A congenital myopathy had been already diagnosed in her brother and in addition her half-cousin died diagnosed with a severe nemaline myopathy at age 4 years. A muscle biopsy performed on both siblings revealed histological and ultrastructural features of 'cap myopathy'. This case report suggests that 'cap myopathy' and some cases of nemaline myopathy with neonatal onset might be two phenotypic expressions of the same genetic disorder. These two entities could therefore, perhaps, be regarded as 'Z-line disorders' possibly caused by defective myofibrillogenesis.

  • 36.
    Dahl-Halvarsson, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olive, Montse
    Institut Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge – Hospital de Bellvitge, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Pokrzywa, Malgorzata
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Palmer, Ruth H.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Uv, Anne Elisabeth
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Drosophila model of myosin myopathy rescued by overexpression of a TRIM-protein family member2018In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, no 28, p. E6566-E6575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myosin is a molecular motor indispensable for body movement and heart contractility. Apart from pure cardiomyopathy, mutations in MYH7 encoding slow/β-cardiac myosin heavy chain also cause skeletal muscle disease with or without cardiac involvement. Mutations within the α-helical rod domain of MYH7are mainly associated with Laing distal myopathy. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the pathology of the recurrent causative MYH7 mutation (K1729del), we have developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of Laing distal myopathy by genomic engineering of the Drosophila Mhc locus. Homozygous MhcK1728del animals die during larval/pupal stages, and both homozygous and heterozygous larvae display reduced muscle function. Flies expressing only MhcK1728del in indirect flight and jump muscles, and heterozygous MhcK1728del animals, were flightless, with reduced movement and decreased lifespan. Sarcomeres of MhcK1728del mutant indirect flight muscles and larval body wall muscles were disrupted with clearly disorganized muscle filaments. Homozygous MhcK1728del larvae also demonstrated structural and functional impairments in heart muscle, which were not observed in heterozygous animals, indicating a dose-dependent effect of the mutated allele. The impaired jump and flight ability and the myopathy of indirect flight and leg muscles associated with MhcK1728del were fully suppressed by expression of Abba/Thin, an E3-ligase that is essential for maintaining sarcomere integrity. This model of Laing distal myopathy in Drosophila recapitulates certain morphological phenotypic features seen in Laing distal myopathy patients with the recurrent K1729del mutation. Our observations that Abba/Thin modulates these phenotypes suggest that manipulation of Abba/Thin activity levels may be beneficial in Laing distal myopathy.

  • 37.
    Darin, Niklas
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden / Department of Pediatrics, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Östman-Smith, I.
    Department of Pediatrics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gilljam, T.
    Department of Pediatrics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Oldfors, Anders
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    New skeletal myopathy and cardiomyopathy associated with a missense mutation in MYH72007In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 68, no 23, p. 2041-2042Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Dige, Anders
    et al.
    Gastro-Immuno Research Laboratory (GIRL), Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Magnusson, Maria K.
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hvas, Christian Lodberg
    Gastro-Immuno Research Laboratory (GIRL), Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Kelsen, Jens
    Gastro-Immuno Research Laboratory (GIRL), Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Wick, Mary Jo
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Agnholt, Jørgen
    Gastro-Immuno Research Laboratory (GIRL), Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Reduced numbers of mucosal DR(int) macrophages and increased numbers of CD103(+) dendritic cells during anti-TNF-α treatment in patients with Crohn's disease2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 692-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Anti-TNF-α treatment constitutes a mainstay in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD), but its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. We aimed to investigate the effects of adalimumab, a human monoclonal TNF-α antibody, on macrophage (MQ) and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in mucosal biopsies and peripheral blood.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Intestinal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 different CD patients both before and 4 weeks after the initiation of the induction of adalimumab treatment. Endoscopic disease activity was estimated by the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease. Biopsies were obtained from inflamed and non-inflamed areas. The numbers of lamina propria CD14 (+) DR(int) and CD14 (+) DR(hi) MQs, CD141(+), CD141(-) and CD103(+ )DCs subsets, and circulating monocytes and DCs were analyzed using flow cytometry.

    RESULTS: At baseline, we observed higher numbers of DR(int) MQs and lower numbers of CD103(+ )DCs in inflamed versus non-inflamed mucosa [843 vs. 391/10(5) lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) (p < 0.05) and 9 vs. 19 × 10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.01), respectively]. After four weeks of adalimumab treatment, the numbers of DR(int) MQs decreased [843 to 379/10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.03)], whereas the numbers of CD103(+ )DCs increased [9-20 × 10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.003)] compared with baseline. In peripheral blood, no alterations were observed in monocyte or DC numbers between baseline and week 4.

    CONCLUSIONS: In CD, mucosal inflammation is associated with high numbers of DR(int) MQs and low numbers of CD103(+ )DCs. This composition of intestinal myeloid subsets is reversed by anti-TNF-α treatment. These results suggest that DR(int) MQs play a pivotal role in CD inflammation.

  • 39.
    Drungaite, Akvile
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Anorexia Nervosa: What Makes Patients Feel Better During the Illness and the Process of Recovery?2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Objective: When caring for a patient with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) it is difficult for the registered nurses to develop a good nurse-patient relationship due to a lack of understanding for the illness.  It is important for the nurse to understand the suffering that the AN patients experience, and what makes them feel better, to be able to improve the patient-nurse relationship. This study aims to explore what makes patients with AN feel better during the illness and the process of recovery.

    Method: A qualitative scientific approach was used. Eight autobiographies were selected as data for this study. Both English and Swedish books were used. The data was analyzed using a qualitative method of data analysis.

    Results: The ways patients with AN could feel better are presented in seven themes: being seen as a whole individual behind the illness, being able to trust and find security, taking responsibility for recovery, finding motivation to keep fighting towards recovery, when one's suffering is noticed, filling a void, and the strengthening of the relationship between care giver and patient. This study may help registered nurses understand the needs of the patient recovering from AN and help them meet these needs in a better way.

  • 40.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Eriksson, Monika
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Irene
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Healthcare providers’ experiences of assessing and performing oral care in older adults2018In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e12189Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Elhag, Wahiba
    et al.
    Department of Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, State of Qatar.
    Abdulrazzaq, Sama
    Department of Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of Qatar.
    Abdullah, Ali
    Department of Internal Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of Qatar.
    Elsherif, Mohamed
    Department of Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of Qatar.
    Elgenaied, Israa
    Department of Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of Qatar.
    Evolution of 29 Anthropometric, Nutritional, and Cardiometabolic Parameters Among Morbidly Obese Adolescents 2 Years Post Sleeve Gastrectomy2018In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 474-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a popular treatment for adolescent morbid obesity. Research on LSG outcomes among adolescents assessed a narrow range of anthropometric, nutritional, or cardiometabolic parameters, leading to an incomplete picture of these changes. We examined a wide variety of anthropometric, nutritional, and cardiometabolic parameters among adolescents before and after LSG. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical charts of all obese adolescents who underwent LSG at Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar, between January 2011 and June 2015 (N = 102). We assessed preoperative levels and postoperative changes in 4 anthropometric, 15 nutritional, and 10 cardiometabolic parameters. Results The study sample comprised 79 patients with complete information (36 males, mean age 15.99 +/- 1.1 years). At a mean of 24.2 months post-LSG, we observed (1) significantly reduced mean weight and body mass index by 51.82 +/- 28.1 kg and 17 +/- 6.24 kg/m(2), respectively; (2) the highest prevalence of post-LSG deficiencies pertained to vitamin D, albumin, and ferritin (89.3, 38, and 33.3%, respectively); (3) low hemoglobin levels (29.3%) only in females; (4) trace elements were not deficient; (4) significant reductions in percentage of adolescents with elevated low-density lipoprotein (from 66.1 to 38.9%), alanine aminotransferase (from 45.3 to 10.9%), and aspartate aminotransferase (from 24.1 to 8.6%) levels; (5) 100% remission of prediabetes cases; and (6) 80% remission of type 2 diabetes cases. Conclusions LSG achieved significant weight loss and improvement of cardiometabolic risk factors among adolescents. However, the slight worsening of preexisting nutritional deficiencies warrants careful preoperative surveillance and appropriate postoperative nutritional supplementation.

  • 42.
    Elhag, Wahiba
    et al.
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Razaq, Sama
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Elsherif, Mohamed
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qata.
    Mustafa, Isra
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qata.
    Lorcaserin vs. Phentermine among non-surgical and surgical obese patients: Anthropometric, glycemic, lipid, safety and cost outcomes2019In: Annals of Medicine and Surgery, ISSN 2049-0801, Vol. 45, p. 75-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To evaluate effectiveness, safety, and costs of Lorcaserin vs. phentermine among obese non–surgical and surgical patients (post bariatric surgery). Methods: This retrospective study retrieved charts of all patients (January 2013–June 2016) who received Lorcaserin or phentermine for 3 months. The study assessed anthropometric, glycemic, and lipid changes, as well as side effects and cost of medications among overweight and obese non-surgical (n = 83) and surgical patients (n = 46). These two patient groups were compared using Chi-square (χ2) and unpaired‘t’ test for qualitative and quantitative variables respectively. Results: At 3 months, among the non-surgical group, Phentermine patients had greater percentage of total weight loss (TWL%) (7.65 ± 8.26 vs. 2.99 ± 3.72%, P = 0.003), and greater BMI reduction (−3.16 ± 3.63 vs. −1.15 ± 1.53 kg/m2, P = 0.003) than Lorcaserin. Within the surgical group, Lorcaserin patients had significantly smaller TWL% (1.86 ± 5.06 vs. 7.62 ± 9.80%, P = 0.012), and smaller BMI reduction (−0.74 ± 1.80 vs. −3.06 ± 4.08 kg/m2, P = 0.012) than Phentermine. Lorcaserin exhibited significant total cholesterol and LDL improvements only among surgical patients with significant weight reduction (≥5% TW). Both medications were not associated with glycemic improvements among non-surgical and surgical groups. Phentermine had slightly more side effects but was less expensive. Conclusions: Among both patient groups, phentermine was more effective in achieving weight loss. Lorcaserin showed dyslipidemia improvements only among surgical patients who achieved significant weight reduction. Anti-obesity medications as part of weight management programs can result in weight loss among non-surgical and surgical patients, or halt weight regain among surgical patients. This is the first study to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of two anti-obesity medications (lorcaserin vs. phentermine) among two distinct obese patient groups, non-surgical and surgical patients. 

  • 43.
    Elmoghazy, Walid
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Department of Surgery, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt.
    Ahmed, Khalid
    Department of Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Vijay, Adarsh
    Department of Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Kamel, Yasser
    Department of Internal Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Elaffandi, Ahmed
    Department of Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar .
    Kakil, Rasul
    National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha, Qatar.
    Khalaf, Hatem
    Department of Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Hepatocellular carcinoma in a rapidly growing community: Epidemiology, clinico-pathology and predictors of extrahepatic metastasis2019In: Arab Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1687-1979, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 38-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and study aims: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with extrahepatic metastasis has been studied, however, data from the Middle East remain scarce. In this study, we assess epidemiology of HCC in Qatar, and identify predictors of the metastatic behaviour. Patients and methods: All newly-diagnosed HCC patients on top of liver cirrhosis between 2011 and 2015 were included in the study. Results: A total of 180 patients met our inclusion criteria. The mean age was 58.8 ± 10.5 years with a mean follow-up of 1.0 ± 1.1 years. There were 150 male patients and HCV was the most common cause of liver cirrhosis 108 (60%), and 22 (12.2%) patients were classified as Child-Pugh class C. The overall survival of 51.1%, and 47 (26%) had at least one extrahepatic metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Single site metastasis was diagnosed in 10 patients, whereas 37 patients had multiple sites metastases. We compared patients who had metastases with patients who did not have metastasis at the time of diagnosis of HCC regarding several variables, and analysis revealed that tumour diameter larger than 5 cm (OR = 6.10, 95% CI = 1.85–20.12) (p = 0.003), and bilobar liver involvement (OR = 5.49, 95% CI = 1.10–27.30) (p = 0.037) were independent predictors of metastatic behaviour of HCC. Conclusion: The incidence of HCC is rising in our population, extrahepatic metastasis is no longer rare and tumours larger than 5 cm and bilobar involvement are determinants of the extrahepatic metastasis. © 2019 Pan-Arab Association of Gastroenterology

  • 44.
    Engqvist, Inger
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Skaraborg Hospitals, Falköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The recovery process of postpartum psychosis from both the woman's and next of kin's perspective: An interview study in Sweden2014In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 8-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Objectives: The most serious type of psychiatric disorder in connection with childbirth is postpartum psychosis. With this disorder occasionally follows emotional rejection of the infant which has serious long term effect on mother and child. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of the recovery process of postpartum psychosis from the women, from the partners of the women, and their next of kin.

    Methods: Interviews were conducted with seven women, who had previously suffered postpartum psychosis, and six of their next of kin. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.

    Results: Two categories emerged: the recovery process and the circumstances of the support provided. The women and their next of kin spoke about the turning point in the illness, their own personal as well as their social recovery, the importance of support not only from relatives and friends, but also from professionals, and the use of medication. However, the key to recovery was an internal decision by the women themselves.

    Conclusion: Conclusion is that the recovery from this severe mental disorder requires hard work and the key to their recovery was the decision made by the women. This disorder causes a mental darkness to descend, but at the start of the recovery a dim light shines in the dark tunnel. The nursing staff must be made aware that good sleep is important for the psychiatric treatment and that recovery may take a long time. The nurse needs to provide hope and encouragement, as well as help the woman to recognise the strength that exists within her. To reduce the risk of a recurrence of the disorder, the staff needs to offer follow up visits.

  • 45.
    Enroth, Helena
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Retz, Karolina
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Andersson, Sofie
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Andersson, Carl
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Svensson, Kristina
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ljungström, Lars
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Tilevik, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Evaluation of QuickFISH and maldi Sepsityper for identification of bacteria in bloodstream infection2019In: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 249-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Early detection of bacteria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns are critical to guide therapeutic decision-making for optimal care of septic patients. The current gold standard, blood culturing followed by subculture on agar plates for subsequent identification, is too slow leading to excessive use of broad-spectrum antibiotic with harmful consequences for the patient and, in the long run, the public health. The aim of the present study was to assess the performance of two commercial assays, QuickFISH® (OpGen) and Maldi Sepsityper™ (Bruker Daltonics) for early and accurate identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood cultures.

    Materials and methods: During two substudies of positive blood cultures, the two commercial assays were assessed against the routine method used at the clinical microbiology laboratory, Unilabs AB, at Skaraborg Hospital, Sweden.

    Results: The Maldi Sepsityper™ assay enabled earlier microorganism identification. Using the cut-off for definite species identification according to the reference method (>2.0), sufficiently accurate species identification was achieved, but only among Gram-negative bacteria. The QuickFISH®assay was time-saving and showed high concordance with the reference method, 94.8% (95% CI 88.4–98.3), when the causative agent was covered by the QuickFISH® assay.

    Conclusions: The use of the commercial assays may shorten the time to identification of causative agents in bloodstream infections and can be a good complement to the current clinical routine diagnostics. Nevertheless, the performance of the commercial assays is considerably affected by the characteristics of the causative agents.

  • 46.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    Department of Health Sciences, University of Buskerud, Drammen, Norway.
    Older women's experiences of suffering from urinary tract infections2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 9-10, p. 1385-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe and explore older women's experiences of having had repeated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Background: UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections among older women. Approximately one-third of very old women suffer from at least one UTI each year. Despite the high incidence of UTI, little is known about the impact of UTI on health and daily life in older women. Design: A qualitative descriptive design. Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with 20 Swedish women aged 67-96 years who suffered from repeated UTIs the preceding year. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Two main themes were identified: being in a state of manageable suffering and depending on alleviation. Being in a state of manageable suffering was described in terms of experiencing physical and psychological health problems, struggling to deal with the illness and being restricted in daily life. Depending on alleviation was illustrated in terms of having access to relief but also receiving inadequate care. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that UTIs are a serious health problem among older women that not only affects both physical and mental health but also has serious social consequences. The women in this study described the physical and psychological health problems, struggling to deal with the illness, being restricted in daily life, depending on access to relief and receiving inadequate care. Relevance to clinical practice: It is important to improve the knowledge about how UTI affects the health of older women. This knowledge may help nurses develop strategies to support these women. One important part in the supportive strategies is that nurses can educate these women in self-care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 47.
    Fioretto, Paola
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Del Prato, Stefano
    Department of Clinical & Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Buse, John B.
    Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Goldenberg, Ronald
    LMC Diabetes & Endocrinology, Thornhill, Canada.
    Giorgino, Francesco
    Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy.
    Reyner, Daniel
    AstraZeneca, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA.
    Langkilde, Anna Maria
    AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöstrom, C. David
    AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Efficacy and safety of dapagliflozin in patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment (chronic kidney disease stage 3A): The DERIVE Study2018In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 2532-2540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Dapagliflozin is a selective inhibitor of sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2). This study assessed the efficacy and safety of dapagliflozin 10 mg vs placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and moderate renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], 45-59 mL/min/1.73 m(2); chronic kidney disease [CKD] stage 3A). Materials and methods: In this double-blind, parallel group, Phase 3 study (NCT02413398, ) patients with inadequately controlled T2D (HbA1c 7.0%-11.0%) were randomized (1:1) to dapagliflozin 10 mg once daily (N = 160) or matching placebo (N = 161) for 24 weeks. Randomization was stratified by pre-enrolment glucose-lowering therapy. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in HbA1c at Week 24. Results: At Week 24, compared with placebo, dapagliflozin significantly decreased HbA1c (difference [95% CI], -0.34% [-0.53, -0.15]; P < 0.001), body weight (difference [95% CI], -1.25 kg [-1.90, -0.59]; P < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (difference [95% CI], -0.9 mmol/L [-1.5, -0.4]; P = 0.001) and systolic blood pressure (difference [95% CI], -3.1 mmHg [-6.3, 0.0]; P < 0.05). Decreases from baseline in eGFR were greater with dapagliflozin than placebo at Week 24 (-2.49 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [-4.96, -0.02]), however, eGFR returned to baseline levels at Week 27 (3 weeks post-treatment) (0.61 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [-1.59, 2.81]). No increase in adverse events (AEs; 41.9% vs 47.8%) or serious AEs (5.6% vs 8.7%) were reported with dapagliflozin versus placebo. No AEs of bone fractures, amputations or DKA were reported. Conclusions: The findings of this study (NCT02413398, ) support the positive benefit/risk profile of dapagliflozin for the treatment of patients with T2D and CKD 3A.

  • 48.
    Franx, Bart A. A.
    et al.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Arnoldussen, Ilse A. C.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Kiliaan, Amanda J.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurology, Section for NeuroEpidemiology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, USA / Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit (EPINEP), Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Weight Loss in Patients with Dementia: Considering the Potential Impact of Pharmacotherapy2017In: Drugs & Aging, ISSN 1170-229X, E-ISSN 1179-1969, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 425-436Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unintentional body weight loss is common in patients with dementia and is linked to cognitive impairment and poorer disease outcomes. It is proposed that some dementia medications with market approval, while aiming to improve cognitive and functional outcomes of a patient with dementia, are associated with reported body weight or body mass index loss. This review presents evidence in the published literature on body weight loss in dementia, describes selected theories behind body weight loss, evaluates the potential impact of approved dementia pharmacotherapies on body weight, considers the potential role for medical foods, understands the potential influence of treatments for neuropsychiatric symptoms and signs, and finally, summarizes this important area.

  • 49.
    Frost, Morgan
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Social perception in Autism: An eye tracking and pupillometric study2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Typically developing humans innately place subjective value on social information and orient attention to it. This can be shown through eye tracking and pupillometry, a method used to show attentional engagement. Social brain development and social preference is present from infancy, and is thought to rely on a carefully balanced network of neurotransmitters and neural connections. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) presents altered neural systems which cause individuals to perceive and process social information differently, but the neurophysiology of this difference remains unclear. Previous research shows atypical gaze patterns, hyperarousal, and lack of orienting to social stimuli in ASD. Since autism is highly comorbid and shares traits with other neurodevelopmental disorders, it is difficult to distinguish aspects of these social processing differences. This study used a group of 35 neuropsychiatric patients to investigate how individuals with autism process social and non-social scenes. Eye tracking and pupillometry measures were collected while participants observed images of natural scenes with or without a person. Participants with autism did not show a pupillary response to social images and were slower to fixate on the face  region than the other participants. Additionally there were correlations between clinical measures of social functioning and the length of time it took to fixate to faces. The results highlight important distinctions of social processing in autism. This thesis proposes a new perspective of looking at the social deficits present in autism spectrum disorder. It suggests reframing the current discussion from two leading hypotheses to a unified approach and formally considering the limitations of differing types of stimuli.

  • 50.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Schwartz-Barcott, Donna
    University of Rhode Island.
    von Post, Iréne
    Åbo Academy University, Vasa.
    Home: The place the older adult can not imagine living without2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rapidly aging populations with an increased desire to remain at home and changes in health policy that promote the transfer of health care from formal places, as hospitals and institutions, to the more informal setting of one's home support the need for   further research that is designed specifically to understand the experience of home among older adults. Yet, little is known among health care providers about the older adult's experience of home. The aim of this study was to understand the experience of home as experienced by older adults living in a rural community in Sweden.

    Methods: Hermeneutical interpretation, as developed by von Post and Eriksson and based on Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics, was used to interpret interviews with six older adults. The interpretation included a self examination of the researcher's experiences and   prejudices and proceeded through several readings which integrated the text with the   reader, allowed new questions to emerge, fused the horizons, summarized main and sub-themes and allowed a new understanding to emerge.

    Results: Two main and six sub-themes emerged. Home was experienced as the place the older adult could not imagine living without but also as the place one might be forced to leave. The older adult's thoughts vacillated between the well known present and all its comforts and the unknown future with all its questions and fears, including the underlying   threat of loosing one's home.

    Conclusions: Home has become so integral to life itself and such an intimate part of the older adult's being that when older adults lose their home, they also loose the place closest   to their heart, the place where they are at home and can maintain their identity, integrity and way of living. Additional effort needs to be made to understand the older adult's experience of home within home health care in order to minimize intrusion and maximize care. There is a need to more fully explore the older adult's experience with health care providers in the home and its impact on the older adult's sense of "being at home" and their health and overall well-being.

12345 1 - 50 of 202
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf