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  • 1.
    Bourlat, Sarah J.
    et al.
    Centre for Biodiversity Monitoring, Leibniz Institute for the Analysis of Biodiversity Change/ZFMK, Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany.
    Tschan, Georg F.
    Centre for Biodiversity Monitoring, Leibniz Institute for the Analysis of Biodiversity Change/ZFMK, Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany.
    Martin, Sebastian
    Centre for Biodiversity Monitoring, Leibniz Institute for the Analysis of Biodiversity Change/ZFMK, Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany.
    Iqram, Muhammad
    Biology Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    A red listing gap analysis of molluscs and crustaceans in Northern Europe: What has happened in the last 10 years?2023In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 286, article id 110247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the current rates of species extinction on a global level, Red List assessments need to speed up to inform conservation management in a timely manner. This study analyzed the progress made over the last 10 years in red listing aquatic invertebrates in Northern Europe. A survey of 43 freshwater molluscs and 1492 marine crustaceans was carried out for their Red List status in twelve countries during a twenty year interval (2003−2022). Our survey demonstrated that many countries have no national Red List or outdated Red Lists for the freshwater molluscs and only four countries have assessed their existing crustacean species. Alarmingly, we find 13 % fewer occurrence records for the crustaceans and 48 % fewer records for the freshwater molluscs in GBIF in the last 10 years (2013−2022) than in the 10 years previously (2003−2012). A barcode gap analysis reveals more barcodes for the 16S gene (77 %) than for the COI gene (63 %) for the freshwater molluscs and even fewer barcodes for the marine crustaceans (17 % for 16S and 40 % for the COI gene). With the current methods, regular comprehensive red listing of aquatic invertebrates is unrealistic. Here we present a set of scripts that allow automated occurrence and barcode gap analyses on unrepresented species groups. Finally, we discuss ways to increase the number of occurrence records and speed up red listing under existing European frameworks through whole community screening of ecosystems using molecular and other emerging tools.

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  • 2.
    Huggenberger, S.
    et al.
    Department II of Anatomy, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    Swedish Species Information Centre/ArtDatabanken, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Oelschläger, H. H. A.
    Department of Anatomy III (Dr. Senckenbergische Anatomie), Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Asymmetry of the nasofacial skull in toothed whales (Odontoceti)2017In: Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0952-8369, E-ISSN 1469-7998, Vol. 302, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the nasal asymmetry of odontocetes (toothed whales) was analyzed morphometrically by placing landmarks on photographed nasofacial skulls from 12 different species and genera that belong to four odontocete families. The results show that the degree of asymmetry tends to be linked with the mechanism of click sound generation in odontocetes. The narrow-banded high-frequency echolocators, such as Phocoenidae, Inia geoffrensis, Pontoporia blainvillei and Cephalorhynchus commersonii, show a more symmetric skull than the broad-banded low-frequency species (most delphinids). Exceptions to this tendency are, for example Kogia sima, with narrow-banded high-frequency clicks and a high degree of nasofacial asymmetry, and Feresa attenuata, a delphinid with broad-banded low-frequency clicks and a moderate degree of nasofacial asymmetry. Accordingly, there is no consistent functional correlation between click type and skull asymmetry probably because the nasofacial skull does not strictly reflect the anatomy of the sound generating nasal soft structures.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Ida
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Flodpärlmusslans (M. margaritifera) förekomst och täthet genom NPK+ och blå målklassning: En studie i Kolarebäcken – Västra Götalands län2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Streams in Sweden mainly occurs in woodland, where a decent forest management plan can improve the water quality. Thus, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) constructed Conservation value, Impact, Sensitivity and Added values (CISA) and Blue targeting, which were further developed by the Swedish Forest Agency. CISA involves an inventory, which marks visual variables within streams according to a check list. Blue targeting is based on the CISA credits and describes the consideration ambition level. In 2005, Kolarebäcken contained one of the largest populations of the red-listed freshwater pearl mussel (M. margaritifera) in Västra Götaland County. However, a significant reduction of the species is currently detected. The study aims to investigate whether Blue targeting, Sensitivity and the subcategories of CISA checklist might explain where freshwater pearl mussels occur and where high or low densities are found in a stream, plus whether variables within significant categories or subcategories in CISA favor the occurrence and density. Kolarebäcken was inventoried according to the Swedish Forest Agency’s manual. Stream sections, containing one CISA credit and Blue target, were constructed based on fluctuations in forest or water. The mussels’ occurrence and density were obtained from the County Administrative Board’s inventory locations in 2011 and 2017. Neither Pearson's Chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test nor ANOVA indicates that Blue targeting can explain where occurrence or high, alternatively low, densities are found. Unpaired t-tests and Welch t-tests indicates that the occurrence is mainly affected by high conservation values in the stream and riparian zone, especially occurrence of dead wood generated by an old riparian zone. Multiple linear regression analysis indicates that high densities mainly occurs within segments including high conservation values, sensitivity and low impact, especially an old, wet riparian zone. Investigations of several streams are required to confirm that the association in Kolarebäcken represents other streams.

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  • 4.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wayland, Matthew Thomas
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Host records and geographical distribution of Corynosoma magdaleni, C. semerme and C. strumosum (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae)2020In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 8, article id e50500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A literature survey was conducted to investigate the host and geographical distribution patterns of three Corynosoma species (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae), viz. C. magdaleni, C. semerme and C. strumosum. All three species appear to be restricted to the Northern Hemisphere. Occurrence records of C. magdaleni are limited to the Northern Atlantic coasts, while C. semerme has a circumpolar distribution. The geographical range of Corynosoma strumosum encompasses the distributions of the other two species, but also extends into warmer southern regions. Some Corynosoma populations are living with their definitive hosts in very isolated locations, such as in the brackish Baltic Sea or different freshwater lakes (e.g. Lake Saimaa). All three species have a heteroxenous life cycle, comprising a peracaridan intermediate host, a fish paratenic host and a mammalian definitive host. Occasionally, an acanthocephalan may enter an accidental host, from which it is unable to complete its life cycle. The host records reported here are categorised by type, i.e. intermediate, paratenic, definitive or accidental. While most of the definitive hosts are shared amongst the three Corynosoma species, C. strumosum showed the broadest range of paratenic hosts, which reflects its more extensive geographical distribution. One aim of this study and extensive literature summary is to guide future sampling efforts therewith contribute to throw more light on the on-going species and morphotype discussion for this interesting parasite species.

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  • 5.
    Mauritsson, Karl
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. Ecological and Environmental Modeling, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment. Ecological and Environmental Modeling, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    A new flexible model for maintenance and feeding expenses that improves description of individual growth in insects2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 16751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic theories in ecology interpret ecological patterns at different levels through the lens of metabolism, typically applying allometric scaling to describe energy use. This requires a sound theory for individual metabolism. Common mechanistic growth models, such as ‘von Bertalanffy’, ‘dynamic energy budgets’ and the ‘ontogenetic growth model’ lack some potentially important aspects, especially regarding regulation of somatic maintenance. We develop a model for ontogenetic growth of animals, applicable to ad libitum and food limited conditions, based on an energy balance that expresses growth as the net result of assimilation and metabolic costs for maintenance, feeding and food processing. The most important contribution is the division of maintenance into a ‘non-negotiable’ and a ‘negotiable’ part, potentially resulting in hyperallometric scaling of maintenance and downregulated maintenance under food restriction. The model can also account for effects of body composition and type of growth at the cellular level. Common mechanistic growth models often fail to fully capture growth of insects. However, our model was able to capture empirical growth patterns observed in house crickets.

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  • 6.
    Sromek, Ludmila
    et al.
    Department of Marine Ecosystems Functioning, Institute of Oceanography, University of Gdansk, Gdynia, Poland.
    Ylinen, Eeva
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Kunnasranta, Mervi
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland ; Natural Resources Institute Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Maduna, Simo N.
    Department of Ecosystem in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Sinisalo, Tuula
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Michell, Craig T.
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland ; Red Sea Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    Kovacs, Kit M.
    Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lydersen, Christian
    Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Tromsø, Norway.
    Ieshko, Evgeny
    Institute of Biology, Karelian Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Petrozavodsk, Russia.
    Andrievskaya, Elena
    The Baltic Ringed Seal Foundation, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Alexeev, Vyacheslav
    The Baltic Ringed Seal Foundation, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Hagen, Snorre B.
    Department of Ecosystem in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Nyman, Tommi
    Department of Ecosystem in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Loss of species and genetic diversity during colonization: Insights from acanthocephalan parasites in northern European seals2023In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 13, no 10, article id e10608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on host–parasite systems that have experienced distributional shifts, range fragmentation, and population declines in the past can provide information regarding how parasite community richness and genetic diversity will change as a result of anthropogenic environmental changes in the future. Here, we studied how sequential postglacial colonization, shifts in habitat, and reduced host population sizes have influenced species richness and genetic diversity of Corynosoma (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) parasites in northern European marine, brackish, and freshwater seal populations. We collected Corynosoma population samples from Arctic, Baltic, Ladoga, and Saimaa ringed seal subspecies and Baltic gray seals, and then applied COI barcoding and triple-enzyme restriction-site associated DNA (3RAD) sequencing to delimit species, clarify their distributions and community structures, and elucidate patterns of intraspecific gene flow and genetic diversity. Our results showed that Corynosoma species diversity reflected host colonization histories and population sizes, with four species being present in the Arctic, three in the Baltic Sea, two in Lake Ladoga, and only one in Lake Saimaa. We found statistically significant population-genetic differentiation within all three Corynosoma species that occur in more than one seal (sub)species. Genetic diversity tended to be high in Corynosoma populations originating from Arctic ringed seals and low in the landlocked populations. Our results indicate that acanthocephalan communities in landlocked seal populations are impoverished with respect to both species and intraspecific genetic diversity. Interestingly, the loss of genetic diversity within Corynosoma species seems to have been less drastic than in their seal hosts, possibly due to their large local effective population sizes resulting from high infection intensities and effective intra-host population mixing. Our study highlights the utility of genomic methods in investigations of community composition and genetic diversity of understudied parasites.

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  • 7.
    Wickenberg, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Zoology, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland.
    Reynolds, Julian D.
    Department of Zoology, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland.
    A recent Irish record of the woodlouse Acaeroplastes melanurus (Budde-Lund, 1885) (Isopoda: Porcellionidae), considered to be extinct in the British Isles2002In: Bulletin of the Irish Biogeographical Society, ISSN 0332-1185, Vol. 26, p. 60-63Article in journal (Other academic)
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