his.sePublications
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Subjective visual awareness emerges prior to P3
Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. (Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi, Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2771-1588
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 43, no 12, 1601-1611 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies on the neural basis of visual awareness, the subjective experience of seeing, have found several potential neural corre- lates of visual awareness. Some of them may not directly correlate with awareness but with post-perceptual processes, such as reporting one’s awareness of the stimulus. We dissociated potential electrophysiological correlates of visual awareness from those occurring during response selection and thus co-occurring with post-perceptual processing. The participants performed two GO-NOGO conditions. In the aware-GO condition they responded with a key press when they were aware of the stimulus and withheld responding when they were unaware of it. In the unaware-GO condition they withheld responding when they were aware and responded when they were not aware of the stimulus. Thus, event-related potentials could be measured to aware and una- ware trials when responding was required and when not required. The results revealed that the N200 amplitude (180–280 ms) over the occipital and posterior temporal cortex was enhanced in aware trials as compared with trials without awareness. This effect (visual awareness negativity, VAN) did not depend on responding. The amplitude of P3 (350–450 ms) also was enhanced in aware trials as compared with unaware trials. In addition, the amplitudes in the P3 time window depended on responding: they were greater when awareness was mapped to GO-response than when not, suggesting that P3 reflects post-perceptual process- ing, that is, it occurs after awareness has emerged. These findings support theories of visual awareness that assume a relatively early onset of visual awareness before P3. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 43, no 12, 1601-1611 p.
National Category
Other Biological Topics
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12750DOI: 10.1111/ejn.13264ISI: 000379931800006PubMedID: 27109009ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84975120008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-12750DiVA: diva2:951287
Available from: 2016-08-08 Created: 2016-08-08 Last updated: 2016-10-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Revonsuo, Antti
By organisation
School of BioscienceThe Systems Biology Research Centre
In the same journal
European Journal of Neuroscience
Other Biological Topics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 132 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link