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Perceptions of users and providers on barriers to utilizing skilled birth care in mid- and far-western Nepal: a qualitative study
Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal .
Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal / Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal / Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Nepal Public Health Foundation, Kathmandu, Nepal .
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2014 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9880, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 7, 1-9 p., 24580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Although skilled birth care contributes significantly to the prevention of maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality, utilization of such care is poor in mid- and far-western Nepal. This study explored the perceptions of service users and providers regarding barriers to skilled birth care.

DESIGN: We conducted 24 focus group discussions, 12 each with service users and service providers from different health institutions in mid- and far-western Nepal. All discussions examined the perceptions and experiences of service users and providers regarding barriers to skilled birth care and explored possible solutions to overcoming such barriers.

RESULTS: Our results determined that major barriers to skilled birth care include inadequate knowledge of the importance of services offered by skilled birth attendants (SBAs), distance to health facilities, unavailability of transport services, and poor availability of SBAs. Other barriers included poor infrastructure, meager services, inadequate information about services/facilities, cultural practices and beliefs, and low prioritization of birth care. Moreover, the tradition of isolating women during and after childbirth decreased the likelihood that women would utilize delivery care services at health facilities.

CONCLUSIONS: Service users and providers perceived inadequate availability and accessibility of skilled birth care in remote areas of Nepal, and overall utilization of these services was poor. Therefore, training and recruiting locally available health workers, helping community groups establish transport mechanisms, upgrading physical facilities and services at health institutions, and increasing community awareness of the importance of skilled birth care will help bridge these gaps.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CoAction Publishing, 2014. Vol. 7, 1-9 p., 24580
Keyword [en]
Nepal, barrier, qualitative, skilled birth attendants, skilled birth care, utilization
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10745DOI: 10.3402/gha.v7.24580ISI: 000340061000001PubMedID: 25119066Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84928754483OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-10745DiVA: diva2:846435
Available from: 2015-08-17 Created: 2015-03-15 Last updated: 2016-04-12Bibliographically approved

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Krettek, Alexandra
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf