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Uterine prolapse and its impact on quality of life in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site, Bhaktapur, Nepal
Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal / Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal / Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
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2015 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 8, 1-9 p., 28771Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Uterine prolapse (UP) is a reproductive health problem and public health issue in low-income countries including Nepal.

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify the contributing factors and stages of UP and its impact on quality of life in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site of Bhaktapur, Nepal.

DESIGN: Our three-phase study used descriptive cross-sectional analysis to assess quality of life and stages of UP and case-control analysis to identify contributing factors. First, a household survey explored the prevalence of self-reported UP (Phase 1). Second, we used a standardized tool in a 5-day screening camp to determine quality of life among UP-affected women (Phase 2). Finally, a 1-month community survey traced self-reported cases from Phase 1 (Phase 3). To validate UP diagnoses, we reviewed participants' clinical records, and we used screening camp records to trace women without UP.

RESULTS: Among 48 affected women in Phase 1, 32 had Stage II UP and 16 had either Stage I or Stage III UP. Compared with Stage I women (4.62%), almost all women with Stage III UP reported reduced quality of life. Decreased quality of life correlated significantly with Stages I-III. Self-reported UP prevalence (8.7%) included all treated and non-treated cases. In Phase 3, 277 of 402 respondents reported being affected by UP and 125 were unaffected. The odds of having UP were threefold higher among illiterate women compared with literate women (OR=3.02, 95% CI 1.76-5.17), 50% lower among women from nuclear families compared with extended families (OR=0.56, 95% CI 0.35-0.90) and lower among women with 1-2 parity compared to >5 parity (OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.14-0.75).

CONCLUSIONS: The stages of UP correlated with quality of life resulting from varied perceptions regarding physical health, emotional stress, and social limitation. Parity, education, age, and family type associated with UP. Our results suggest the importance of developing policies and programs that are focused on early health care for UP. Through family planning and health education programs targeting women, as well as women empowerment programs for prevention of UP, it will be possible to restore quality of life related to UP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CoAction Publishing, 2015. Vol. 8, 1-9 p., 28771
Keyword [en]
Health Demographic Surveillance Site, Nepal, quality of life, uterine prolapse
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11343DOI: 10.3402/gha.v8.28771ISI: 000359379500001PubMedID: 26265389OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-11343DiVA: diva2:846410
Available from: 2015-08-17 Created: 2015-08-17 Last updated: 2016-04-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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