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Computer game-based upper extremity training in the home environment in stroke persons: a single subject design
Rehabilitation Medicine, The Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg / Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde.
Rehabilitation Medicine, The Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg / Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde.
University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. (Interaction Lab)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9287-9507
University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. (Interaction Lab)
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2014 (English)In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1743-0003, E-ISSN 1743-0003, Vol. 11, no 1, 35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The objective of the present study was to assess whether computer game-based training in the home setting in the late phase after stroke could improve upper extremity motor function.

METHODS: Twelve subjects with prior stroke were recruited; 11 completed the study.

DESIGN: The study had a single subject design; there was a baseline test (A1), a during intervention test (B) once a week, a post-test (A2) measured directly after the treatment phase, plus a follow-up (C) 16-18 weeks after the treatment phase. Information on motor function (Fugl-Meyer), grip force (GrippitR) and arm function in activity (ARAT, ABILHAND) was gathered at A1, A2 and C. During B, only Fugl-Meyer and ARAT were measured. The intervention comprised five weeks of game-based computer training in the home environment. All games were designed to be controlled by either the affected arm alone or by both arms. Conventional formulae were used to calculate the mean, median and standard deviations. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used for tests of dependent samples. Continuous data were analyzed by methods for repeated measures and ordinal data were analyzed by methods for ordered multinomial data using cumulative logistic models. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

RESULTS: Six females and five males, participated in the study with an average age of 58 years (range 26-66). FMA-UE A-D (motor function), ARAT, the maximal grip force and the mean grip force on the affected side show significant improvements at post-test and follow-up compared to baseline. No significant correlation was found between the amount of game time and changes in the outcomes investigated in this study.

CONCLUSION: The results indicate that computer game-based training could be a promising approach to improve upper extremity function in the late phase after stroke, since in this study, changes were achieved in motor function and activity capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 11, no 1, 35
Keyword [en]
Stroke, Upper extremity, Community living, Home-based rehabilitation, Computer games, Neurological rehabilitation
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-9106DOI: 10.1186/1743-0003-11-35ISI: 000334706200001PubMedID: 24625289Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84899457475OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-9106DiVA: diva2:719122
Available from: 2014-05-23 Created: 2014-05-23 Last updated: 2016-06-23Bibliographically approved

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