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Facets and mechanisms of adaptive pain behavior: predictive regulation and action
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Division of Anaesthesia, University of Cambridge, Addenbrookes University Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.
2013 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 7, 755- p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neural mechanisms underlying nociception and pain perception are considered to serve the ultimate goal of limiting tissue damage. However, since pain usually occurs in complex environments and situations that call for elaborate control over behavior, simple avoidance is insufficient to explain a range of mammalian pain responses, especially in the presence of competing goals. In this integrative review we propose a Predictive Regulation and Action (PRA) model of acute pain processing. It emphasizes evidence that the nervous system is organized to anticipate potential pain and to adjust behavior before the risk of tissue damage becomes critical. Regulatory processes occur on many levels, and can be dynamically influenced by local interactions or by modulation from other brain areas in the network. The PRA model centers on neural substrates supporting the predictive nature of pain processing, as well as on finely-calibrated yet versatile regulatory processes that ultimately affect behavior. We outline several operational categories of pain behavior, from spinally-mediated reflexes to adaptive voluntary action, situated at various neural levels. An implication is that neural processes that track potential tissue damage in terms of behavioral consequences are an integral part of pain perception.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A. , 2013. Vol. 7, 755- p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8788DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00755ISI: 000327935500001PubMedID: 24348358OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-8788DiVA: diva2:696587
Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2014-02-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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