his.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The association between self-rated health and impaired glucose tolerance in Swedish adults: A cross-sectional study
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2188-4306
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sweden.
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health, University of Stavanger, Norway.
Insitute of Medicine, Department of Primary Health Care, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 31, no 2, 111-118 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To investigate gender differences in the association between self-rated health (SRH) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in subjects unaware of their glucose tolerance. Design. A cross-sectional population-based study. Setting. The two municipalities of Vara and Skovde in south-western Sweden. Subjects. A total of 2502 participants (1301 women and 1201 men), aged 30-75, were randomly selected from the population. Main outcome measures. IGT was regarded as the outcome measure and SRH as the main risk factor. Results. The prevalence of IGT was significantly higher in women (11.9%) than in men (10.1%), (p = 0.029), as was the prevalence of low SRH (women: 35.4%; men: 22.1%, p = 0.006). Both men and women with low SRH had a poorer risk factor profile than those with high SRH, and a statistically significant crude association between SRH and IGT was found in both men (OR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.8-4.4) and women (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.2, p = 0.033). However, after controlling for several lifestyle factors and biomedical variables, the association was attenuated and remained statistically significant solely in men (OR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.2-4.3). Conclusion. The gender-specific associations found between SRH and IGT suggest that SRH may be a better indicator of IGT in men than in women. Future studies should evaluate the utility of SRH in comparison with objective health measures as a potential aid to health practitioners when deciding whether to screen for IGT and T2DM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2013. Vol. 31, no 2, 111-118 p.
Keyword [en]
Gender, general practice, impaired glucose tolerance, self-rated health, Sweden
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8425DOI: 10.3109/02813432.2013.784541ISI: 000318643200010PubMedID: 23621319Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84877659337OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-8425DiVA: diva2:641437
Available from: 2013-08-16 Created: 2013-08-16 Last updated: 2015-05-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, Susanne
By organisation
School of Life Sciences
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 785 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf