his.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Use of complementary, non-pharmacological pain reduction methods during childbirth among foreign-born and Swedish-born women
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
Karolinska Inst, CeFAM, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
2010 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 26, no 4, 442-449 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: to investigate the association between country of origin of women and their use of complementary pain reduction methods (i.e. non-pharmacological) during childbirth in Sweden. Design: cross-sectional design. Setting: a national register-based study. Participants: 215,497 singleton deliveries (including the first birth of each woman during the period) of women aged 18-47 years in Sweden between 1996 and 1998, divided into 12 subgroups of countries or regions. Measurements: the use of complementary pain reduction methods during childbirth was analysed by logistic regression, adjusting for parity, level of education, number of antenatal care visits, complications in pregnancy, complications during childbirth, use of any pharmacological methods and use of epidural/spinal analgesia during childbirth. Findings: all subgroups of foreign-born women, except those from Finland, had lower odds of complementary pain reduction methods during childbirth than Swedish-born women. Women from Bosnia, Arab countries, Sub-Saharan Africa, Turkey, Iranand Asia had about 40% lower odds for use of complementary pain reduction methods during childbirth than Swedish-born women. Women who used epidural analgesia had higher odds for use of complementary pain reduction methods during childbirth than women who did not use any pharmacological methods. Key conclusion: most subgroups of foreign-born women showed lower odds for and a different pattern in the use of complementary pain reduction methods during childbirth than Swedish-born women. These findings raise questions of whether the Swedish health-care system and care providers have sufficient awareness of and insight into the socio-cultural context of giving birth. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2010. Vol. 26, no 4, 442-449 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6824DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2008.10.005ISI: 000279742400011PubMedID: 19084300Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77954620898OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-6824DiVA: diva2:571549
Available from: 2012-11-23 Created: 2012-11-15 Last updated: 2012-11-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Robertson, Eva
By organisation
School of Life Sciences
In the same journal
Midwifery
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 51 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf