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Depressive mood in women at childbirth predicts their mood and relationship with infant and partner during the first year postpartum
Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden .
Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden .
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 2, 245-253 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depressive mood in women at childbirth predicts their mood and relationship with infant and partner during the first year postpartum Background: Although many studies have reported negative impact of maternal depressive symptoms on family relations, few studies have explored whether or not early depressive symptoms influence interfamily relationships. The aim was to describe first-time mothers feelings for their infant and partner during the first postpartum year in relation to maternal depressive symptoms. Research questions were addressed about: What is the prevalence of maternal depressive symptoms 10 days postpartum? How does maternal depressive symptoms on day 10 relate to her mood and feelings for the infant and partner at days 3 and 10, and at 6 and 12 months postpartum? Methods: A longitudinal study with first-time mothers, normal pregnancies, giving birth to healthy babies participated in the study; altogether, n = 419. Depressive symptoms were measured by Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 3 and 10 days. Additional questionnaires assessing the womans mood and relationship with her infant and partner were filled out at days 3 and 10, and at 6 and 12 months postpartum. Results: Twenty-two per cent of the women scored high on EPDS on day 10 postpartum. In addition, low mood seemed to remain prevalent over the babys first year, as confirmed by the mood scale at 6 and 12 months postpartum. Women with depressive symptoms showed less closeness, warmth and confidence as measured by the infant and partner relationship scales over the first year. Mothers with a high EPDS score on day 3 scored less optimal on the relationship scale to the infant at days 3 and 10, but not 6 or 12 months postpartum. Conclusions: To screen women for depressive symptoms, 10 days postpartum seems to be predictive of maternal assessment of maternalinfant relationship throughout the first year and enables early intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. Vol. 26, no 2, 245-253 p.
Keyword [en]
depressive mood, father, mother-infant inter-action, newborn, nursing, relationship
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-6189DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2011.00925.xISI: 000304000000006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84861001457OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-6189DiVA: diva2:543558
Available from: 2012-08-08 Created: 2012-08-08 Last updated: 2013-03-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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