his.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Returning from Oblivion: Imaging the Neural Core of Consciousness
Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, FI-20521 Turku, Finland / Department of Anesthesiology, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, 60220 Seinäjoki, Finland, .
VA Long Beach Healthcare system (Long Beach, California, 90822), Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Care and the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, University of California-Irvine, California 92868, .
Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Care, and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, FI-20521 Turku, Finland, .
VA Long Beach Healthcare system (Long Beach, California, 90822), Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Care and the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, University of California-Irvine, California 92868, .
Show others and affiliations
2012 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 32, no 14, 4935-4943 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the greatest challenges of modern neuroscience is to discover the neural mechanisms of consciousness and to explain how they produce the conscious state. We sought the underlying neural substrate of human consciousness by manipulating the level of consciousness in volunteers with anesthetic agents and visualizing the resultant changes in brain activity using regional cerebral blood flow imaging with positron emission tomography. Study design and methodology were chosen to dissociate the state-related changes in consciousness from the effects of the anesthetic drugs. We found the emergence of consciousness, as assessed with a motor response to a spoken command, to be associated with the activation of a core network involving subcortical and limbic regions that become functionally coupled with parts of frontal and inferior parietal cortices upon awakening from unconsciousness. The neural core of consciousness thus involves forebrain arousal acting to link motor intentions originating in posterior sensory integration regions with motor action control arising in more anterior brain regions. These findings reveal the clearest picture yet of the minimal neural correlates required for a conscious state to emerge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Neuroscience , 2012. Vol. 32, no 14, 4935-4943 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5763DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4962-11.2012ISI: 000302783500024PubMedID: 22492049Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84859372207OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-5763DiVA: diva2:523689
Available from: 2012-04-25 Created: 2012-04-25 Last updated: 2016-04-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopusLänk till fulltext

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Revonsuo, Antti
By organisation
School of Humanities and Informatics
In the same journal
Journal of Neuroscience
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 796 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf