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The role of robotic modelling in cognitive science
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
Center for Research in Cognitive Science, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
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2011 (English)In: New ideas in psychology, ISSN 0732-118X, E-ISSN 1873-3522, Vol. 29, no 3, 312-324 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

From the perspective of cognitive robotics, this paper presents a modern interpretation of Newell’s (1973) reasoning and suggestions for why and how cognitive psychologists should develop models of cognitive phenomena. We argue that the shortcomings of current cognitive modelling approaches are due in significant part to a lack of exactly the kind of integration required for the development of embodied autonomous robotics. Moreover we suggest that considerations of embodiment, situatedness, and autonomy, intrinsic to cognitive robotics, provide an appropriate basis for the integration and theoretic cumulation that Newell argued was necessary for psychology to mature. From this perspective we analyse the role of embodiment and modes of situatedness in terms of integration, cognition, emotion, and autonomy. Four complementary perspectives on embodied and situated cognitive science are considered in terms of their potential to contribute to cognitive robotics, cognitive science, and psychological theorizing: minimal cognition and organization, enactive perception and sensorimotor contingency, homeostasis and emotion, and social embedding. In combination these perspectives provide a framework for cognitive robotics, not only wholly compatible with the original aims of cognitive modelling, but as a more appropriate methodology than those currently in common use within psychology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011. Vol. 29, no 3, 312-324 p.
Keyword [en]
Autonomy, Cognitve modelling, Cognitive robotics, Ebodiment, Emotion, Enaction
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-5194ISI: 000292127000009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79956122033OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-5194DiVA: diva2:429219
Available from: 2011-07-04 Created: 2011-07-04 Last updated: 2015-10-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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