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Deriving motor primitives through action segmentation
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1227-6843
University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1177-4119
2011 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 1, 1-11 p., 243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present experiment is to further understand the effect of levels of processing (top-down vs. bottom-up) on the perception of movement kinematics and primitives for grasping actions in order to gain insight into possible primitives used by the mirror system. In the present study, we investigated the potential of identifying such primitives using an action segmentation task. Specifically, we investigated whether or not segmentation was driven primarily by the kinematics of the action, as opposed to high-level top-down information about the action and the object used in the action. Participants in the experiment were shown 12 point-light movies of object-centered hand/arm actions that were either presented in their canonical orientation together with the object in question (top-down condition) or upside down (inverted) without information about the object (bottom-up condition). The results show that (1) despite impaired high-level action recognition for the inverted actions participants were able to reliably segment the actions according to lower-level kinematic variables, (2) segmentation behavior in both groups was significantly related to the kinematic variables of change in direction, velocity, and acceleration of the wrist (thumb and finger tips) for most of the included actions. This indicates that top-down activation of an action representation leads to similar segmentation behavior for hand/arm actions compared to bottom-up, or local, visual processing when performing a fairly unconstrained segmentation task. Motor primitives as parts of more complex actions may therefore be reliably derived through visual segmentation based on movement kinematics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A. , 2011. Vol. 1, 1-11 p., 243
Keyword [en]
action representation, event segmentation, motor primitives, mirror neurons, point-light displays, biological motion, action recognition, motor cognition
National Category
Computer and Information Science
Research subject
Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:his:diva-4806DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2010.00243ISI: 000208863700009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-82555172189OAI: oai:DiVA.org:his-4806DiVA: diva2:409989
Available from: 2011-04-12 Created: 2011-04-12 Last updated: 2016-12-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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Output format
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